Runners Forum - Kick Runners banner
1 - 20 of 56 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,810 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A couple of us who practice yoga thought there might be enough interest to start a yoga thread and now that Orange Mat is home from her trip the timing seems right. Besides, if the swimmers can have their own thread we should have our own too! <img alt="biggrin.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/biggrin.gif"><br><br>
Anyone is welcome to participate whether you do yoga or not so feel free to jump right in. Hopefully, we can even convince some people into giving yoga a try. We'll see how the thread goes and hopefully we'll get enough participation to keep it going. Let me know what you think.<br><br>
Namaste!<br><br><img alt="" src="http://www.healinginyoga.com/images/ShivaRasa.jpg" style="border:0px solid;">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,124 Posts
Thanks for starting, Choovie. Just earlier this evening I came across this video, <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h_0Edu8sxRk&NR=1" target="_blank">Yoga for Runners</a>, so I thought that could be a good entree to some discussion. While Sadie's form and instructions are right on target, there's a lot she doesn't mention that might be important to know for those new to yoga. Things such as foot alignment and other isometric actions involving the lower limbs. Also, she's much more open than the average human being, let alone a runner, so when you see her pelvis all the way on the floor in pigeon, for example, that might be setting some people up for false expectations of how they might end up looking in the pose. So basically what's missing is her telling us what you're supposed to be feeling in the poses and where. So if you have any questions, ask away! <img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
388 Posts
I'm an ancient runner (74 in April) who had very little flexibility until I started yoga 3 years ago. Not only was I 'stiff' but I culd barely get my leg over a bicycle bar. I go once weekly to a senior center for 'Yoga for Older Adults'. the class is limited to 12 because of the room size and has remained quite uniform in composition (with waiting lists). As often happens in these gentle yoga classes I'm one of two men. Not only has it helped me with stretches but also a feeling of total relaxation. I usually run the morning of my class. This morning I swam instead. Regardless of the morning exercise I leave yoga feeling relaxed and energized.<br>
Hope my 'testimonial' encourages more runners, especially men, to try yoga.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
962 Posts
Hi Choover,<br>
a yoga thread, absolutely! I sort of knew it was coming...<img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif"><br>
I started yoga last November when I was injured and on a running hiatus. I kind of jumped into the deep end, and signed up for Bikram yoga. For those who are not familiar, Bikram yoga is done in a very hot and humid room, and each session is 90min long. We do the same postures, that are in a specific order, every week. I find that (at least this type of) yoga is a hard workout on its own, and I definitely need recovery time after each yoga session. It's a complete package with strength, balance, flexibility and endurance component built in. I enjoy practicing, but as my running is picking up I am starting to have a hard time fitting it into my training week, especially beside swimming. These days I go once, max. twice weekly.<br>
I am not sure where I am going with all this<img alt="roll_eyes.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/roll_eyes.gif">, so I just leave it as an introduction of sorts to my yoga practice.<br>
j
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,810 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I feel guilty confessing this after starting the yoga thread but I ended up skipping yoga class tonight due to feeling over-tired. Instead, I spent an hour on the floor stretching to American Idol. <img alt="biggrin.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/biggrin.gif"><br><br>
OM, Henrun and Jura -- thanks for popping in.<br><br><b>Henrun</b>, thanks for the testimonial comments and voicing encouragement to others. Seems like many of the classes I attend have as many men as women.<br><br><b>Jura</b>, I am toooo skeerd to try Bikram!! You Rawk. No one in our town even offers a class in it. I can get hot enough in a regular flow class let alone in a room heated to 105 degrees.<br><br><b>OM</b>, thanks for the video link. I like the straight leg stretch where she rotates her foot to the pinky side to stretch the side of the leg. It's amazing how the subtlest movements can quickly change the focus of the stretch. I'll have to show that one to MrC as it should be good for his ITBS.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
Jura, thanks for the info on the Bikram yoga. I'm going to check into that and see if its offered at any of the yoga studio's in the area. I was taking yoga for a while, although it was only a beginners class. I seemed to find it more relaxing then anything, but maybe that's because as beginners, the poses were not that difficult. I then started pilates after the yoga classes ended, and I really like pilates. More ab work then yoga. Like Jura, I'm trying to run more, so many of the fun classes like yoga and pilates are taking a back seat to my running. But this thread has given me a good reminder and I will definately check into that style of yoga. Thanks!<br><br>
Add to edit... I found a yoga studio that offers the Bikram yoga..... I sent the link to a girlfriend to see if she'd be interested in trying it out. In case anyone wanted to read up on it, here is the link:<br><br><a href="http://www.bikramyogaoc.com/about.html" target="_blank">http://www.bikramyogaoc.com/about.html</a>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,361 Posts
I just returned from my first yoga class in more than a month. I must admit...I missed it...or I should say...my body missed the classes in this past month. As a long distance runner who does not have much back ground in any athletic sport, yoga has helped me to stay injury free for the last 2,000 miles and 5 marathons.<br><br>
I am so excited to see this thread and I am looking forward to learning more from two splendid goddesss...choovie and OM who are experts in this.<br><br>
Gracias for starting this thread!!!!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,124 Posts
I must admit, I've never tried Bikram. Been tempted to, on several occasions, but at each occurrence, better judgment kept me from going. For one, having a natural tendency to looser joints, the knee and other limb "locking" that they advocate just feels really wrong to me. Hypermobility of the joints, that's what I've got. That's why running suits me, because the gravity and the pounding actually work to keep my joints tighter, more closed. So being too flexible, in the joints at least, is definitely what I would not want to work toward.<br><br>
Also, the extreme heat, while I love it when I'm running, I'm just afraid it would make me so sick. I know me, and I work really hard as it is when I practice. I'm sweating at the get-go, with all that generating of internal heat. <img alt="blush.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/blush.gif"><br><br>
And finally, I came to yoga from a really strong fitness background as it is (I was the kickboxing queen, used to do squat-kicks for fun), and so the strong fitness aspect of the Bikram style classes is not what I was looking for from yoga. Now that's not to say I don't like to take nor teach a strong and rigorous class myself. It's just that you have to know yourself and your own tendencies and limitations, ya know?<br><br>
That said, I'm <i>still</i> tempted to try a class one of these days, because of how I hear that everyone loves it so much. Still on the fence, but erring on the side of caution, I guess. We'll see. <img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
933 Posts
Hi yogis and yoginis (is that terminology correct?)<br><br>
I wanted to check in since I'm on the running shelf for a while and yoga will play a larger role than ever in my quest for fitness & sanity.<br><br>
I participated in a couple of workshops dubbed "Yoga For Stiff Guys" that were targeted at, you guessed it, guys. I even managed to make it onto the <a href="http://www.coilyoga.com/workshop.html#guys" target="_blank">promo on the studio webpage</a>. (that's me on the left ... quit your laughing!)<br><br><img alt="" src="http://www.coilyoga.com/img/stiffIMG_1666.jpg" style="border:0px solid;"><br><br>
Mrs hup and I also practice whenever possible at said studio, plus we have several DVDs, some great, some .... eh, that we use to practice at home.<br><br>
Lately I've discovered practicing the yin style, which I really like.<br><br>
Namaste<br>
hup
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,515 Posts
Good morning. What a nice thread! I do yoga every Saturday morning and I just looooovvvvveeeeee it! We do ashtanga yoga and it's a big class. The instructor is very good and she changes it up a little bit each week; for example, last Sat she worked on a lot of balance poses. The week before she worked more on core poses. Sometimes I have the opportunity to take an extra class during the week, but not often.<br><br>
I was wondering if anyone could recommend a good novice level yoga DVD? Something that's very explicit, meaning that the instructor says stuff like "your back foot should be at a 45 degree angle, with weight equally distributed on heel and forefoot", or "your knee should not extend past your big toe". Some of the DVDs go very quickly and don't give clear directions, and if you can't see the posture clearly in the DVD, you risk injury or falling. Nice background music is a plus too.....of course!<br><br>
Thanks! I look forward to reading more on this thread.<br>
Susan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
962 Posts
Hi OM,<br>
I actually started Bikram because the studio happened to be fairly close to where I live. Also, their classes are all the same, whereas other studios have different classes (beginner, mixed, advanced, meditation, teacher training etc.). This gives me the flexibility to go when I can fit it into my schedule. I wasn't too worried of the heat, being cold most of the time, but I was in for a surprise with that one! When I enter the hot room, it feels really good, but the moment the poses starts, oh boy! By the time the class ends, most of us has soaked all their clothes and their towel! But it feels really good after, it's very cleansing. As for the hyperflexibility issue, I certainly noticed that my stretches are deeper in the hot room, but I am very careful with overstretching now. I was a bit over enthusiastic at the beginning, but the painful lesson was learned fairly quickly. The teachers don't push the students in our studio, everybody works out at their level of ability.<br>
j
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,180 Posts
Greetings and thanks for starting the thread. I'm a noob at yoga as I just began practicing about 4 months ago. I consider myself to be at the beginner level and probably will remain there for a while. I try to do around 30 minutes each and every morning, and as I've been described in the past generously as "moody", I concentrate just as much on the relaxation and meditation techniques as I do on the stretching. I'm trying to stay "centered" throughout the day.<br><br>
I don't have a lot of options in the little town I live in as to classes. There are 2 or 3 at my gym at different levels of ability, but I mostly follow along on a couple of Rodney Yee DVD's. (I don't really care about him being the "yogi to the stars" or the big scandal some years back. The dude reminds me of my son in law, so I like him.) Mrs. Johnny has given me a few pointers as well. Before her neck problems and surgery this past year she would practice regularly, even doing Bikram yoga.<br><br>
I've decided to temporarily cut out all one foot standing and balancing poses for a while to see if my foot improves. I find it hard to believe that putting all my weight on one foot is delaying the healing of my injury, but after a month of no running, I'm looking at everything now.<br><br>
Nice picture, <b>hup</b> & thanks again <b>choovie</b>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,124 Posts
Hi Jura,<br><br>
Like I said, so many people love Bikram, and that's what tempts me to try it. Maybe this summer, when the shock of the temperature change won't be so drastic. <img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif"><br><br>
Glad you enjoy your practice. That's truly all that matters, of course.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,810 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Hi <b>Sherie</b>, <b>Riley</b>, <b>Mariposai</b>, <b>Hup</b> and <b>Johnny</b>!<br><br>
Nice looking warrior, <b>Hup</b>! Yoga For Stiff Guys -- what a funny name.<br><br>
I believe yoga has helped me stay injury free for running too, <b>Mari</b>, although I do have to watch the pressure on my wrists and elbows when doing lots of downdogs, planks, chaturangas, etc. I've only been practicing about 2 yrs but love the variety in classes that are available and it's definitely helped me regain some flexibility lost through running.<br><br><b>Johnny</b>, what are we going to do with that foot of yours?? Sounds wise to take a break from the one-foot poses.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,124 Posts
Choovie, you've mentioned sore wrists a couple times now. Do you have carpal tunnel syndrome? Better yet, have you been taught how to draw energy up from the floor through your hands and wrists, rather than letting your body weight dump into your hands? I know that tends to get glazed looks from some people, when you mention "energy" and all that woowoo stuff, but I'm talking about specific alignment points and principles that one practices toward that end. Such as making sure you put equal pressure on the thumb and index finger mounds, because the natural tendency is to let more weight go to the outsides of the hands. Also, spreading the fingers wide, wrist creases parallel with the front edge of the mat, and pressing down firmly with the finger pads, almost like you're clawing at your mat. Your nail beds should change slightly in color from the pressure -- the tendency here is for the outermost digits of the fingers to press only at the knuckle, almost hyperextending the fingers. Pay attention to your hands. They're just as an important part of your foundation as your feet, especially in downward facing dog.<br><br>
I could go on further (which I'm sure you've already figured out!), and talk about the wrists, forearms, and upwards, but I don't want to overload everyone here with too much information. Yoga TMI, heh, that's funny. <img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,804 Posts
...I would love to do more stretching...........unfortunately my lower back (L-5-6) is really tight right now...<br><br>
........and I ain't feelin' Lucky.....<br><br>
may try a very gently Cat-Stretch......any suggestions OM??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,124 Posts
(((tomwhite's lower back)))<br><br>
You probably know this already from all your back care experience (Dr. Bookspan, did I get the name right?), but the main point I always try to remember is that the abdominals should function to <b>fortify</b> the lowback. Not overly tight and contracted, but not loose and disengaged either. Firmed support, that's what you want to have, and some people refer to that as "bracing". I like to use the word "fortify". Whatever works for you, as long as you get it. <img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif"><br><br>
So yes, some gentle cat/cow stretches with the abs firm to fortify the lumbar area, even when your belly releases down in the cow position. You can do the cat/cows either in the traditional all-fours position, or standing with knees bent, or even seated in crossed-legs position, whatever you like the best. Personally, I like the standing position when my lowback is spasming (lucky me that I now know what that feels like, so I can advise others, eh?). I find when you're standing it takes a bit of the pressure off the connecting muscles, minimizing any sciatica episodes. Just don't make the movement more about your chest, shoulders and neck.<br><br>
Anyway, here's what I mean: hands on your thighs with elbows slightly bent outward, neck in line with spine and your gaze forward onto the floor, knees slightly bent but not past your ankles, butt back and pelvis neutral. Inhale to fill the chest forward through your arms, your chin will lift slightly and your back will arch a bit, nice and easy. Just the length created in your front body by the deep inhale is sufficient to arch the back -- i.e. let the breath be the prime mover of this exercise rather than your bones and muscles. Now exhale and gently fill out the lowback, puffing out the kidneys (if that makes any sense -- if not, don't sweat it). As you exhale, your navel will come a little closer to your spine and the bottom of the diaphragm will lift, creating more space in the middle torso area for you to naturally curve forward a bit. Your chin will naturally drop a bit as the spine rounds. Try really hard not to drop your chest and shoulders in order to make the hollowing out of your middle happen. Think more about moving the sides of the waist back and breathing out your back. Your shoulders should stay in the same place in space, and collarbones broad. Again, let the breathing move you rather than your body moving itself.<br><br>
So yeah, what you said, some gentle cat stretches.<img alt="blush.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/blush.gif">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,485 Posts
Tom - you need to meow when you do this also - for the full and most beneficial effect. And then you need to put it on youtube, k?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,804 Posts
...thanks OM.......<br><br><b>NO Thanks</b>..... Tamster.......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,485 Posts
disgust ..... ungrateful pirate.....
 
1 - 20 of 56 Posts
Top