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Just wondering what it was that got you to start running. Sometimes hearing other people's stories is a great inspiration and right now I am feeling in a bit of a slump so I could use some motivation.<br><br>
My story is sort of simple. I have a friend who moved and I didn't get to see her often. She emailed me one day that she was doing the Philly DIstance Run and asked if I wanted to do it, or meet her there, just as a chance to see each other. No way I could just jump into a HM but at the time they also had a 5K associated with the PDR. So I said what the heck, I will try it. I was never a runner, hated it, couldn't stand when we had to do the mile in high school. But I had lots of crazy stuff going on in my life and figured it would be a healthy distraction. So I did it, ran it in something like 31 mins and I was thrilled!!! I got hooked!<br><br>
Since then I have done loads of 5Ks, a few 10Ks, an 8K, a couple of 10milers and a HM. I have had my ups and downs, had my injuries, and (like now) my slumps. But I keep coming back to it. This Sept will be 3 years since I became a runner! And I am looking forward to all the years to come!!!
 

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My dad got me hooked. When I was younger he ran 10k's. He doesn't run anymore, but at the time he ran most weeknights. Going running with him gave me a chance to have some time just with my dad. Those conversations helped us build a good relationship.<br>
Since then I have gone in phases. Sometimes I am very consistent and other times I can go too long without running. But it is my only sport...running in a straight line is about all my unathletic self can handle!<img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif">
 

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I got started because having switched to MDI (Multiple Daily Injections) it had opened up the possibility of doing endurance type of exercise with less fear of going hypoglycemic and I felt that running could be very beneficial to the circulatory system in my legs, always a concern for type 1 diabetics.
 

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I got into running for a number of reasons.<br><br>
1.Peace and serenity.<br>
2.Weight loss<br>
3.Improving general health<br>
4. And I didn't want to spend a whole lot of money doing it.<br><br>
That's not why I run now, except for the peace and serenity.
 

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One weekend, my brother was moving back home from out of state...and I went to help him pack and move. I was staying at a hotel nearby, and woke up one morning wanting to get a stationary bike workout in before I got along with my day. I'd been gradually trying to improve my health for a couple of years, and had really only done the bike and weights (after a long time of playing organized sports, I'd learned to associate running with punishment), but the hotel only had a treadmill, so I hopped on.<br>
2 - 4:00 running segments later, and I was hooked.
 

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My dad was a runner and growing up I was athletic, but didn't really get into running. After college, I started running as my exercise, but stuck to being about a 3-4 mile-a-dayer. Entered my first race -- a 4 mile race in Central Park -- and liked it, but never pushed any further. Then last summer I attended the IronMan Coeur d'Alene -- and saw people completing that race that I thought <i>looked</i> like they had no business doing 140+ miles (not being rude, that was just my impression of some of them!). When I got home, I got fitted for shoes, registered for the Philly Distance Run HM, and away I went. Started seeing changes in my fitness and my body and loved it. Never turned back. Ran my first marathon (you were there, <b>Beaker</b>! <img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif"> ) in April and am looking forward to the next one. I'm even dabbling in the tri world in September... I'm hooked, and I love it. <img alt="biggrin.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/biggrin.gif">
 

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It's kind of a funny entry into running, but 6 yrs ago I met a guy (my DH) and our first date was a Bar Run with a gang of folks I never met. Prior to that day I had not run for probably 15 years. I had a blast, and the next day I literally could not walk. Soon afterwards, I started running with a girl I met on the Bar Run, we did 2 miles at the time. I ran a 5K that summer, then pretty much hung up my shoes.<br><br>
6 years and 2 babies later, I wanted desperately to shed the pregnancy fat and get back in shape. This time around the reason I started was because I adopted a dog and he was desperately out of shape (almost 40lbs overweight), thus my running began (April '07). My dog and I are now up to 3 miles. He's lost all of his fat and is in great shape, although I still have a bit to go. I would love to catch up with my old running friend, who is now doing half marathons and triathlons.
 

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Its interesting that I now enjoy something like running when growing up I couldnt stand it.<br><br>
I had corrective foot surgery on both feet when I was younger and due to that I had to wear heavy leather corrective shoes that made running darn near impossible. ( I guess its not that I hated running, its just it was hard on me and hurt when I was made to run in school ) I played ice hockey growing up so its not like I was inactive. But as the years went by and the weight added up, I needed to make a change.<br><br>
I started Weight Watchers in December of 03 and lost 40 lbs without exercising. I started walking a mile or two at lunch because it felt good to get out. I then came across a 5k near my home which I entered and walked to 1st place AG hardware. I walked another 5k and place 2nd. It was about that time that I got a flyer from Team in Training. I decided I was going to sign up, fundraise and train for the PF Changs Rock and Roll Marathon. The original plan was I was going to walk the whole thing. Well after I cam across an article about Jeff Galloways Run/Walk program. I started following that method. Wound up hurting myself during training ( ITBS ) but finished the marathon. I was hooked and hurt all at the same time. I have since completed 2 HMs and several 8 and 5ks. Im now looking into doing a sprint tri ( <b>carp,</b> did I just say that out loud <img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif"> )
 

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love hearing this stuff as well.<br><br>
pretty simple for me, I woke up and looked in the mirror they day after feeling like I was gonna collapse running out a triple in a softball game in June 2006and decided enough was enough. I had to do something and by far the easiest thing to do was start running. it suprised me how fast I got hooked on it. The freedom to just go. somedays I pushed myself hard to help clear my mind of everything that was bothering me. other days I went way easy, walked some and ran some (galloway like) when I wanted to. I just love the feeling...man am I hooked...
 

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I started to prove to myself that I could, because I believed for a long time that I couldn't.
 

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My doctor said I should try to do at least 30 minutes of cardio every day as a way to help with stress and sleep issues. I also wanted to loose a few more pounds so it seemed like a good idea. I had a treadmill at home that was just gathering dust. (my sister used to use it a lot) So running seemed the easiest way. I started the C25K and found I really enjoyed the feeling of accomplishment I get when I run just a little longer, or a little further.
 

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My running history is two parts. I first got into it in the summer of 2002. I had just had a fight and realized how poor my cardio was. I weighed about 245 pounds. I was in ok shape, and strong as hell, mostly a meathead lifter. But I knew I either could continue toward 300 pounds or do something. I decided no BS and to start running.<br><br>
At first, I was too embarrassed to run outside and ran on the treadmill at the gym. I would run a few minutes, walk a minute, run a few more. I still remember running 20 minutes straight for the first time. I watched the clock on the treadmill, holding on for dear life as those last few seconds ticked away.<br><br>
By the end of the summer, I was down to about 230 pounds and had begun to follow one of Hal Higdon's 10k training programs. I ran a local 5k that had about 40 people in it. I was so nervous. I was hoping to break 27 minutes and ran 25:33. a month or two later, I ran my second 5k, a Halloween race. Much, much tougher course, so I didn't do as well. I kinda was gettin' into it and kept up the running through November. But I got sick in December and got away from it. I tried to start back up the following spring, but had an injured foot or ankle from playing softball or something.<br><br>
Fast forward to April 2004, part two. I had just started running again after a year and a half, but had continued to drop some tonnage. I fought that April, weighing in at 215 pounds. I was running maybe 10-15 miles per week for like a month. Got knocked the hell out in the fight, but no major damage. But two days later, I broke my wrist playing softball. Lifting was done, fighting was done, so I figured I'd try to get the running thing going again.<br><br>
But this time a 10k training program wasn't enough. It was only about six weeks and I wanted something to get me through the summer. I needed a training plan to tell me when to run and how far. So I looked up a beginner marathon training schedule at Runner's World. The first couple weeks looked doable, so I figured I'd go with that. Furthermore I decided if I could get throught the program, I'd run the Akron Marathon on Oct. 2. It would be one of those things I could scratch of my to-do list before I die.<br><br>
I didn't really think I'd make it through the program. I didn't have the base and the 7-mile long run a handfull of weeks out looked impossible, especially with the big miles, probably all of 12 or so, I had to run during the week. I also figured if I did get deep into the training program, I'd injure myself. And if, by some miracle, I made it through and to the marathon, I'd hurt myself running that. I also figured I'd never want to run again after that, so that was no big deal.<br><br>
Well, as they say, two outta three ain't bad. I suffered two of the classic running injuries, IT band syndrome and runner's knee, in my left knee during training. After the marathon, I was hurt all over the place - hip, knee, foot. Not only was a sore, but injured even more.<br><br>
But what I hadn't counted on was the strong desire to start running again almost immediately. After that marathon I was hooked and have run seven others and a 50k ultra, along with various shorter races, since. I don't think it was until after four or five marathons that I actually started considering myself a runner.
 

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Excellent thread! Thanks Beaker.<br>
I have always been athletic - baseball, hockey, basketball, soccer, horseshoes, badmitten - you name it, I did it or at least tried it. I love team sports, but my knees started giving out in a basketball league that I ran and played in, hockey was getting too late/early, etc. I still play baseball, but that's only ~3 months and is very weather dependent.<br><br>
I weighed 190 in college and found myself at 230#'s 7 years ago. I dieted (Atkins) and shed 25 lbs and needed a way to keep it off. I hovered ~215 lifting, hoops, etc, but was very inconsistent. In late summer 2002 a real great friend asked if I wanted to run the Feaster 5m in Andover, MA. I figured it was a good goal seeing how I had never run further than 3.5m. I used to give others a hard time about their running saying I could get what I needed out of 2 miles - why run further? I really hated running.<br><br>
So, off I went, I ran the 5 miler, then a 10 miler in December, New Year's 10K and found myself signing up for a 16-miler later in January - my goals kept getting bigger. After the 16-miler (by far the longest I had ever run) my friend was urging me to think about Boston that year (as a charitable exempt runner). He got a number, I got a number we ran for an unbelievable charity (I have since run for them 5 consecutive years) - and the rest is 2ohistory.<br>
I tell everyone that my running is the only way I can keep my pants fitting - b/c I hate shopping. It's a great social event, I get to chat with and hopefully meet cool and diverse people like you all and there's nothing like taking in the fresh air.<br><br>
Since starting, like Voo, injuries have happened - PF, strained hammy, back pain, pulled calf muscle - all of which I have recovered from and learned a lot about my body, but better yet, it has led me to meeting a whole other community of runners and athletes. That's how I got connected to my Reach the Beach team and one of them is one of my better friends and running partners now.<br><br>
Running works for me - mentally and physically. I hope to one day start angling for a tri....or 2. The 30's continue to inspire me to grab that next goal.<br><br>
What's next? Everest?<br><br><b>Voo</b> - fighting? Wouldn't want to be on the receiving end of that magic...<br>
(edited to add a space or two)
 

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I started seven years ago, when I got my first desk job and started gaining weight. I was in the highschool track team many years ago, for about a week. It was a bit of a disaster.<br><br>
I was a "fitness jogger" until recently when I came over to Kick and got inspired to push myself by all the accomplished and supportive runners here.<br><br>
It's been amazing to see the way my body is changing...the way it's adapting to challenges. Wow. The human body is amazing.
 

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I was in my freshman year of high school, back in 1984, when the announcements were posted for the fall sports. I saw cross country, and thought I'd give it a try. The rest they say is history
 

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I was to much of a runt to play football even though I wanted to. I ran in HS for the cross country team and the spring track team. I quit runinng at college although I did play Rugby. Then after college I started working and I just didn't have time to run. After several moves and 1 job change I ended up in Jacksonville Florida. Soon after we had moved in to our first apartment here, my parents came to visit and my dad was walking up to the door and I walked out. He looked me up and down and said "[email protected]!" and I knew he meant my weight. When I finally stepped on a scale I saw that I had ballooned up to almost 240 pounds. I told my wife to cut back on my portions of food and that got me down to about 205 or so. Then when I started contracting at my current company I met some guys that all ran at lunch time. I promised myself that once I was a full time employee I would join the gym there and start running with them. Well in 2001 I became a permanent employee and I joined the gym. After 2 months of running solo since I was sort of embarassed about my pace I finally went out with the gang at work. I really enjoyed their camraderie and I have been hooked ever since. Since then I have run 100 races in almost ever distance possible between 1 mile and 50K.<br><br>
My weight has sort of leveled off at about 190 so I need to watch what I eat now but I dont do that well enough. I still enjoy to run and I am still hoping to try a 50 miler sometime in the future and if all goes well I will run the Tahoe Triple next fall.
 

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After summer break in grad school, I ran into a friend of mine who suddenly looked really heathy and fit. I commented on her summer transformation, and she evangelized to me about a sort of couch to 10k program. I'd run a bit in college after first being diagnosed with anxiety and depression, and thought taking it up again would help with school stress. So I asked mr jebba to do it with me. That was September 2000.<br><br>
I've taken some time off over the years, mostly during pregnancy, or gone through months where I only ran 2-3 times a week. But I've always enjoyed it. I'd like to believe that my pr's are still "soft," and that I have it in me to really bust out some respectable (for me) times.<br><br>
My second and last baby was born 4 months ago. I'm at a little over 20 miles a week, and want to work on building my base for the next 6 months to a year. Then I really want to start pushing myself and see where I can go.
 

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Initially I got back into running in 1999 after a 25 year hiatus to train for the Peachtree as well as work on a sudden weight gaining problem. And 5k and 10k races were all I intended to do.<br><br>
Then just after the '99 Peachtree race I saw an article in the Atlanta Track Club's magazine about the Sydney Olympics wanting to test their marathon venue in May, 2000 with 5,000 runners, along with Australian and Japanese Olympic qualifiers.<br><br>
I thought what a neat way to see Australia and run a marathon. I had no idea how to train for a marathon and looking back I'm amazed I didn't do some serious injuries to myself. At any rate I discovered Galloway while doing my weekend runs and started running with them, completed my first 26 mile run training run ever 3 weeks prior to Sydney and completed the Host City Marathon (as Sydney was called) in 4 hours, 25 minutes. I had to walk down steps backwards for 3 days before the soreness left my legs but it was a lot of fun.
 

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It all started my freshman year of high school. Maybe even earlier. I have always admired - at least since middle school - 2 kinds of athletes: cross country runners and wrestlers. Wrestlers always impressed me with their overall fitness. They had to train every part of their body. Cross country just struck me with the level of devotion they had and the kind of talent, a talent to do something seemingly very simple, but to do it better than everyone else. Both of these did this for few, if any, spectators. They were doing it for the love of their sport.<br><br>
Anyway, high school. My freshman PE teacher was Mr. Buck. I never thought that he would have that dramatic an impact on my life. And yet, he showed me something that I hadn't seen. It's a reminder to be mindful of and faithful to the little things. You never know the benefit, the impact your faithfulness will have. In what seemed to me to be an otherwise ordinary PE curriculum, he had us do half hour runs 1 day a week. I didn't like them. I was slow and it was just hard to do. And yet, I gradually got better. My personal best, I still remember thinking that I had to have miscounted the number of laps I ran, was 13 laps. That's 3.25 miles in 30 minutes, or a sub 30 minute 5K (3.1 miles). I'd love to do that today.<br><br>
This showed me, in some way, that I too, could be a runner. Of course, it wasn't all good. I also remember that Mr. Buck set it up so that there would be a physical component to our final exam. One component was a race. You got letter grades based on how you placed! His explanation was that people like me who excelled at book learning and taking tests need not worry about getting a bad grade in the class but that those who were better at being athletes needed a place to shine. I got a D on the 2 mile run, coming in not much over 16 minutes. Mr. Buck was true to his word and I still got an A in the class.<br><br>
So I had this germ of a dream. I could be a runner. It was an ambition I nursed in secret. I never really did anything to live this dream, other than taking long walks. But I never gave up on it, either.<br><br>
We flash forward several years, a decade or more. I have gone through high school, law school, and found my first "real" job and left it for greener pastures. I've gotten married to the best woman in the world. Now, she and I both wanted a way to become more fit, more trim, and spend some time together, too. So, we decide to start riding our bikes together. We huffed and puffed, barely making it 3 miles. It was good together time, but in terms of an exercise plan it was pretty discouraging.<br><br>
Then, Jenny did something amazing. She decides that she is going to ride her bike to work. We can barely make it 3 miles and she decides that she can ride 10 miles there and 10 miles back. I thought she was out of her mind but I really wanted her to succeed, too. So, she hauled off and did it. I think I had to pick her up on the homeward bound leg about a mile or 2 from home, but still, it was amazing!<br><br>
Now, I am not only impressed, I am envious. If <i>she</i> can haul off and do it, then so can I! I calculated the distance to my job - about 11 miles. That's a long way, but seemed just this side of possible. And I did it. It was really hard but I did it. I rode my bike to work probably about once a week for a while. As time went by, the thought of going 11 miles no longer intimidated me. The idea that this was a long way, too long to even think about really, was broken down in my mind. I had a new sense of what was possible.<br><br>
I wish I could remember when I decided that I wanted to do a marathon. It is a part of our culture in a way. It is one of those things that everyone should do before they die. According to whom, I don't know, but we all know this thought exists in our culture. I guess with my nascent dream of being a runner, this seed of culture found fertile ground within me. 26.2 miles is a <span style="text-decoration:underline;">long</span> way to travel. How could I do that?<br><br>
In 2002, I remember hearing a news report about this organization <a href="http://www.1stmarathon.com/" target="_blank"><span style="color:#000000;">1st Marathon</span></a>. They would train total beginners to complete a marathon. Wow! I thought. How cool is that? Of course, I didn't get their contact information, so I felt like they were lost to me. I even began to wonder if they were an out-to-town group - sometimes you see that on the "human interest" segments of the TV news. However, the thought that it was possible for me to be trained was also planted.<br><br>
Then, in 2003 there came the news that there would be a massive event marathon here in Phoenix, namely <a href="http://www.rnraz.com/" target="_blank">PF Chang's Rock N Roll Marathon</a>. By massive event, I mean 30,000 participants, 50 live bands, cheerleaders, an after concert. I knew it was time. I had to start training.<br><br>
I had no clue what to do. I started by running in place! Then, I worked on elliptical trainers. I did that probably for about 2 months. Then, I decided that I needed to actually <span style="text-decoration:underline;">run</span> to train for running! So, I changed over to the treadmill. I'm a pretty big guy. I was frankly embarrassed to run outside. I worked on the 5K "route" on the treadmill for another couple months.<br>
By then, 1st Marathon was back in the news. I cut the article about them out of the paper and signed up. I went to the first run of training up in the DC Ranch area of North Scottsdale. It was a beautiful area. We were even baptized by a light rain at the beginning, marking our initiation into training. I was thrilled that I was able to run the 2 miles with no problems. The treadmill had paid off.<br><br>
Training had its ups and downs but what counts is that I got through it and completed my first marathon!<br><br>
Right now, I just want to get better. I want to be faithful to my training plan. I want to learn how to improve. But mostly, I just want to be a runner. A runner is as a runner does.<br><br>
I may always be the slow kid but I'll be out there doing my best.<br><br>
Thank you, Mr. Buck. Thank you, Jenny. Thanks to all of you who have helped me, in whatever small way, live my dream - my half-crazy secret dream that has burst into ridiculous, exuberant flower after all these years.
 

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Heya,<br><br>
It really started for me at the end of my senior year in high school. We had to run one mile in under eleven minutes. I did it. I ran as fast as I could around that track and it was under eleven minutes, but I dont remember the time.<br>
After I had such bad cramps and I felt so sick.<br>
It was then at that moment in the lunch room where I could not eat that I decided I would be healthy and fit. I was not fat. Just not fit.<br><br>
So the running began. It started with three miles runs on the beach and then longer runs followed. It was in me. I had to run. But never raced. Someone suggested to race after we realized my time. an easy three miles in fifteen minutes ....how did I know that was a good time? I was just in it for the run.<br><br>
I had a goal of running Boston and started to train for longer runs. One icy day on the road as a passanger in a car we were rear-ended. The running stopped. My chiropractor who was a runner told me I may not get it back. Keep trying, but I may not run again.<br><br>
Then followed two pregnancys one right away and one four years later. LOTS of weight gain mostly because of no exercise. The running would happen here and there, but never like what it once was.<br><br>
Now I have started yet again. My mile is sometimes a twelve minute mile and sometimes a fifteen minute mile. But I am running. Faster and longer than in the ten years.<br><br>
My goal is to do small races and build up to a marathon in march 08. I am not going to "try". I am going to do it. If make the pace for Boston..then I will do that too!<br><br>
When I am lazy I hear that voice from the movie My fair Lady when she was at the race track "MOVE YOUR BLOOMIN' ASS!" Cracks me up and gives me enough to go.
 
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