Runners Forum - Kick Runners banner

1 - 20 of 62 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,896 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am starting <a href="http://britishfiction.suite101.com/article.cfm/booker_winner_anne_enright" target="_blank">The Gathering</a> by Anne Enright.<br><br><i>The novel is narrated by thirty nine year-old Veronica Hegarty: it is one of her brothers, Liam, who has killed himself. She feels his death particularly strongly as they were only 11 months apart in age, and the novel follows Veronica’s grieving determination to find out exactly why Liam has taken his own life.<br><br></i> <i>The novel is not a sentimental family tale: the Hegartys have plenty of secrets which Veronica must disentangle, and she herself is not a particularly likeable narrator. She is honest in her dislike of certain aspects of her family, and her inability to deal with long-suppressed secrets leads her to become less and less rational as the novel progresses.</i><br><br><i>Overall, this is not a novel to be taken lightly: its contents certainly leave the reader mentally drained. The quality of the writing in the book suggests, however, that this year’s Booker win was not a fluke, and that Enright’s name will remain familiar in literary circles for years to come.</i>
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,896 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Dammit. Or should I start <a href="http://books.google.com/books?id=k1ygAAAACAAJ&dq=inauthor:Khaled+inauthor:Hosseini&ei=U4HIR7SuEIq-igG98YGLBQ" target="_blank">A Thousand Splendid Suns</a>? I have both.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
432 Posts
<span style="text-decoration:underline;">The Third Chimpanzee</span> by Jared Diamond.<br><br>
"<i>Though we share 98% of our genes with the chimpanzee, our species evolved into something quite extraordinary. Diamond explores the fascinating question of what in less than 2 percent of our genes has enabled us to found civilizations and religions, delevop intricate languages, create art, learn science-and acquire the capacity to destroy all of our achievments overnight.</i>"<br><br>
I'm on a science kick lately.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,101 Posts
<i>We were the Mulvaney's</i> - Joyce Carol Oates<br><br><br>
Amazon.com<br>
Oprah Book Club® Selection, January 2001: A happy family, the Mulvaneys. After decades of marriage, Mom and Dad are still in love--and the proud parents of a brood of youngsters that includes a star athlete, a class valedictorian, and a popular cheerleader. Home is an idyllic place called High Point Farm. And the bonds of attachment within this all-American clan do seem both deep and unconditional: "Mom paused again, drawing in her breath sharply, her eyes suffused with a special lustre, gazing upon her family one by one, with what crazy unbounded love she gazed upon us, and at such a moment my heart would contract as if this woman who was my mother had slipped her fingers inside my rib cage to contain it, as you might hold a wild, thrashing bird to comfort it."<br>
But as we all know, Eden can't last forever. And in the hands of Joyce Carol Oates, who's chronicled just about every variety of familial dysfunction, you know the fall from grace is going to be a doozy. By the time all is said and done, a rape occurs, a daughter is exiled, much alcohol is consumed, and the farm is lost. Even to recount these events in retrospect is a trial for the Mulvaney offspring, one of whom declares: "When I say this is a hard reckoning I mean it's been like squeezing thick drops of blood from my veins." In the hands of a lesser writer, this could be the stuff of a bad television movie. But this is Oates's 26th novel, and by now she knows her material and her craft to perfection. We Were the Mulvaneys is populated with such richly observed and complex characters that we can't help but care about them, even as we wait for disaster to strike them down. --Anita Urquhart
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,896 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That's in my stack as well. I need more time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
432 Posts
<br>
I just got through Richard Dawkins' <span style="text-decoration:underline;">The Blind Watchmaker</span> which is similar in subject matter as <span style="text-decoration:underline;">The Third Chimpanzee</span>.<br><br>
Diamond's writing style seems to be a little more accesible to me. Still, Dawkins' <span style="text-decoration:underline;">The God Delusion</span>, is next on my list.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,896 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have read parts of The God Delusion. It is quite good.<br><br>
I also read <a href="http://books.google.com/books?id=A7U2AAAACAAJ&dq=inauthor:Charles+inauthor:Templeton&ei=um_JR4PvKYjKiQGo2rgK" target="_blank">A Farewell to God</a> by Charles Templeton. It is written from the perspective of a man who devoted many years of his life to the Christian Church and eventually rejected his faith.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,030 Posts
This thread, and I'm intimidated.<br><br>
The last book I read was "One Train Later" - Andy Summers's [The Police] autobiography ...<br><br>
The dude was the Kevin Bacon of classic rock.<br><br>
from wikipedia:<br><i><b>Performing career</b><br>
Though born in Lancashire, Summers grew up in Bournemouth, Dorset, where he started playing jazz guitar as a teenager in local clubs. While a teen he worked in a Bournemouth music store frequented by a young Robert Fripp.<br><br><b>Career prior to the Police</b><br>
Summers began his recording career in the 1960s as the guitarist for Zoot Money's Big Roll Band and its subsequent psychedelic-era incarnation, Dantalian's Chariot. Both were popular acts on the London club scene. Summers was a member for a couple of months (May-July 196<img alt="cool.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/cool.gif"> of the Canterbury scene jazz fusion band Soft Machine, although he did not record with the group. He also recorded with Eric Burdon and The Animals (Love Is), and spent much of the mid-seventies doing session work for Neil Sedaka, Joan Armatrading, Kevin Ayers, Kevin Coyne, Tim Rose, and Jon Lord, and others. At one point, Summers was considered as a replacement for **** Taylor, as lead guitarist for The Rolling Stones; the group eventually chose Ron Wood instead. He was also a member of the pre-Police band Strontium 90 along with Sting, Stewart Copeland and Mike Howlett which was a group formed by Howlett as a part of a reunion concert with his former band Gong where each band member presented a group of their own. Howlett is also credied with getting Summers, Sting and Copeland together to play music together for the first time in a group setting.</i><br><br>
He also jammed with Jimi; sold Eric Clapton his '59 Les Paul Sunburst when EC's was stolen [there were only two in London at the time]; dropped acid with Timothy Leary; hung out in LA with Page & Plant; and much, much more.<br><br>
I picked up "The devil's cup : coffee, the driving force in history" by Stewart Lee Allen.<br><br>
After reading "Travels with barley : a journey through beer culture in America" by Ken Wells, and "Kitchen confidential : adventures in the culinary underbelly" by Anthony Bourdain I find myself drawn to "culinary biographies"<br><br>
Or maybe, just books with titles and subtitles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,809 Posts
Currently: The Traitor by, Stephen Coonts.<br><br>
Tim, read A Thousand Splendid Suns....another eye opening novel of life in the middle east, particularly, Afghanistan. Splendid...no pun intended.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,053 Posts
I am currently awaiting "Do androids dream of electric sheep" and am almost finshed with Regeneration by Julie Czerneda. I am also ready Monkeyluv, a book about pyschology of animals and love and stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
727 Posts
I'm on a Stephen King spree. I dropped by a local thrift shop and found tons of his books.<br><br>
I need the break because I just finished A Compact History of Infinity by David Foster Wallace. All that hardcore, sexy math was over my head.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
432 Posts
Copyright 1992. I know, it's older/dated. But it's still interesting to me.<br><br>
It's sort of like the evolution of evolution....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,241 Posts
That explains it. <img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif"><br><br>
It seems interesting but the humans being 2% different genetically from apes in that excerpt made me wonder...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
<a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=kickrunners-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FFalling-Season-Inside-Aspens-Mountain%2Fdp%2F0898866332%2Fref%3Dpd_bbs_sr_1%3Fie%3DUTF8%26s%3Dbooks%26qid%3D1204742443%26sr%3D8-1" target="_blank">The Falling Season</a><br><br>
A captivating read about the search and rescue work of Aspen Mountain Rescue; some really amazing rescue stories and some insight into the psychology of when a rescue becomes a recovery.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,649 Posts
Slow Fat Triathlete - Jayne Williams - She's funny...I wonder if she posts here? She referred the the Couch to 5K program and Coolrunning.<br><br>
Yooooo whoooo???? Jayne, come out come out wherever you are....
 
1 - 20 of 62 Posts
Top