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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I haven't lost weight (not seriously trying at this time) and don't seem to be doing much more working out, but I believe my wiggly belly fat has started to recede*. I am doing more core work, mostly with the aim of helping my ITB (the exercises include core work) but it doesn't seem like that much more. I also have been <i>trying</i> not to eat as much fat during the day (no Ben and Jerry's for a while, and reduced chocolate intake per day) so maybe that is helping have an effect.<br><br>
I am fairly certain that reducing my overall fat intake is the logical thing to do, in order to keep reducing the cute (NOT) pouch on my front. Anyone have any supporting or counter wisdom to offer?<br><br><br><br><br><span style="font-size:xx-small;">*I cannot back up this feeling with data, like measurements or anything at this time.</span>
 

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losing weight is really the best way to lose the pouch, unfortunately. Reducing overall fat intake is a good step to better health, overall, so good to do no matter what <img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif"> There is also something called "The Abs Diet" that some people swear by. I do not know too much about it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah, I'm not as concerned with losing weight, I'm within about 10 pounds or less of where I want to be. Even if I get to that goal weight, I will still have the pouch (I've done it before, once, and it was still there) so while I figure the abs work will help, I was thinking that the fat reduction should also help and contribute to its reduction. That and some really long slow runs, right? Isn't slower run supposed to burn fat for fuel more than carbs, etc?
 

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Obviously you wouldn't be doing yourself any favours if you ate fast food and ice cream day in and day out, <img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif"> but I think a lot of it depends on the type of fat you eat at least as much as the amount. I get about 25-30% of my daily calories from fat, and I weigh less than I ever have (my BMI is 17). But I only eat plant fats, focusing on omega-3s and other healthy fats. I don't eat anything that's "low fat" aside from in my own baking subbing in banana or apple sauce for eggs/oil. The types of fat and the overall quality of the calories you eat are pretty important, in my experience.<br><br>
And people are just built differently too. Even though I'm very slim I have a little bulge above each hip that probably only I can see.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Could be, runnergirl.<br><br>
I think, however, that my daily percentage of fat (regardless of kind) has been higher than yours <img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif"><br><br>
Aside from the extra fat I've been eating, my food choices regarding quality are usually pretty good from day to day. Veggies, lean protein, fruit, etc. I think it's the little things that get me, eating M&M's after dinner or ice cream. My SO does most of the cooking, which allows for some coconut milk in Thai food from time to time, things like that. Overall, the meals are reasonable when it comes to fat. I know I need some fat, and good fat is better, I just don't think I need as much as I'm getting.<br><br>
I think I just have to be more cognizant of how much fat is in what I am eating. I should be able to cut back on the chocolate by recognizing when I'm eating more than I should. That point probably comes sooner than I think!
 

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Ah, I see. Fat intake definitely shouldn't be over 30% as a general rule. I just figured you were eating "low fat" and having these issues. I know of people who eat only 10-15% of calories from fat.<br><br>
Like you said, is the small things that add up, particularly if they don't offer any real nutritional value otherwise. When you eat chocolate, for example, you should consider eating dark (70%) organic chocolate rather than M&Ms because then at least you're getting the antioxidants from it, as well as a pretty decent amount of iron. M&Ms and most chocolate/candies like that are nutritional zeros. Also, dark/organic chocolate tends to be more rich and more expensive, so you'll be inclined to eat less anyway. (I eat chocolate every single day. <img alt="razz.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/razz.gif"> )<br><br>
Oh and there's nothing wrong with coconut milk sometimes. Just make sure you're eating it with copious amounts of vegetables... the greener the better. <img alt="wink.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/wink.gif"> Although, you may be getting extra unaccounted for fat when your SO cooks if he doesn't carefully measure the oils that are being used. It can really add up! And make sure he's using oil with a good omega3/6 balance, like olive or organic canola.
 

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Gingerbread, I've typed up a response a couple times but can't get it down to what I'm really meaning to say. So here's a best effort. I'm not so sure you can say that reducing overall fat will necessarily help with whatever extra fat you feel sits in your mid-section. Sure, diet will do more good in this area than just rigorous exercise but I don't like cutting [good] fats as a means to this end. Does that make sense?<br><br>
I'd focus on eating as clean as possible (low on the food chain, cutting any processed foods) and see where that gets you in conjunction with regular exercise.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you both!<br><br>
We only have canola and olive oil in the house, so that's not a problem.<br><br>
I don't really want to cut good fats, just any fat I've been eating to excess, I guess.<br><br>
Gawd, I love 70% cocoa chocolate! <img alt="biggrin.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/biggrin.gif"><br><br>
I think I'll ask my SO to see how we can change things IRT evening meals.<br><br>
Gotta run, but I'll check back later.<br><br>
Thanks so much for the input!
 

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When boiled down to its basics, the Abs Diet is essentially 6 smaller meals per day using clean eating principles.<br><br>
Another point from above. Aerobic exercise (i.e. LSD) is not the best for of exercise for weight loss. Short, fast intervals are.<br><br>
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Ah, but I'm not as concerned with losing weight so much as reducing the fat, since that seems to be what is hanging out on my belly. And if I reduce fat, would that help with shrinking the belly bulge? Even when I'm at my best weight (~140-145) I have the belly fat. My thread title was probably not the best.
 

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You know, my response wasn't the best either. <img alt="biggrin.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/biggrin.gif"> What I meant to say was that short, fast running intervals are better at burning fat than continuous aerobic exercise.<br><br>
 

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I am going to get railed I am sure, but .....<br><br>
also, overconsumption of carbs, especially processed ones, will lead to a belly pooch, as well. Like runningNNYC said "clean" eating is the way to go. Don't cut carbs or fat or anything, but make sure both are coming from the BEST sources. Instead of eating bread and pasta, opt for brown rice, quinoa, etc. Things like that...
 

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mmmmmmm quinoa.
 

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Yep, exactly. That's what I was trying to get at in talking about making each calorie count, consuming only the best sources of fat etc. <img alt="wink.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/wink.gif"> I'm just not as concise as others.
 

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Why? Everything you said was correct. <img alt="biggrin.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/biggrin.gif"><br><br>
 

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I think you are right on the button. I try to follow that advice generally (and thats the same advice that comes from weight watchers).<br><br><br>
I, however do think that some of us are unlucky enough to carry all our extra weight there and it seems no matter what I do I am always going to have a belly (partially leftovers from my bad choices of the past).
 

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I think most of us watch for these now, but this is on the same line (not an issue if you are eating clean)<br>
I was reading a study that showed with the same number of Calories, trans-fats will encourage more weight gained or reserved on the waist line. (even those hidden ones they don't tell you about in the label- have to read the ingredients, because it's as a little as 2-3 g a day; and if it has less than half a gram it can say it has none)<br><br>
Obviously, if you are eating clean you aren't eating those processed foods that have the trans-fats.... but it's interesting nonetheless. Plus, it's certainly not going to hurt anything not to eat trans-fats since they are not beneficial and are far more harmful than saturated fats.
 

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Another few studies I have been reading for my research project, have suggested that runners in general eat waaaaaaay more carbs than they actually need. This contributes to many recreational runners' flabby-ness and inability to lose weight.
 
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