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that arent bean or soy based as my body cannot handle large quantities of either. What are some other than eggs?<br><br>
I eat meat but I try to eat veggie most of the time.
 

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Dairy is a pretty good source--cottage cheese has 14 grams per half cup, milk has 8 or 9 grams per cup. Most whole grains are a decent source, I was surprised to find that the whole wheat pasta I get from Safeway has 8 grams in a cup (uncooked). There's actually a bit of protein in most everything (except not really in most fruits), and it all adds up.
 

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Why won't you eat beans or soy? Beans are the best food out there, so nutrient packed and dirt cheap!<br><br>
nuts<br>
quinoa<br>
tvp<br>
spinach has 13g of protein/ cup<br>
whole grains
 

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Neither eggs or dairy could really be called "veggie." <img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif"> They are animal proteins.<br><br>
Sometimes it takes your body some getting used to with beans and soy. Can you maybe try consuming small quantities at first?<br><br>
There are also lentils, chick peas, split peas, nuts, quinoa, wheat, spelt (most grains, really- try amaranth, kamut, barley, buckwheat), rice, leafy greens (very high in protein for the amount of calories), and a really great one- hemp.<br><br>
You can also easily sprout lentils, quinoa, chick peas etc. for some variety.<br><br>
Keep in mind that most people consume 2-3 times the amount of protein that is recommended by government health agencies, and it's not doing much beneficial for their health. In fact, too much protein isn't good for you at all.
 

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I assumed that by "veggie," she means eating vegetarian, which is distinct from vegan in common usage.<br><br><br>
Quinoa rocks! If you haven't tried it, you should.
 

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in addition to what others have suggested, you could try:<br>
quorn<br>
seitan<br><br>
tvp is soy, so i'd stay away from it.
 

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I know what you mean about beans, MG.....I love them but have a lot of GI difficulty eating them no matter how "slowly" I try to introduce them into my diet. Not everyone's system is the same and people who can handle this diet tend to forget that, I think.<br><br>
Interesting about the leafy greens, especially spinach, which I LOVE...I didn't know that!
 

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do you soak your beans? that should help with some of the GI issues.
 

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No, I'm lazy....I use canned <img alt="blush.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/blush.gif"> I don't often have time to cook beans for hours when they are going to be added to another recipe, like soup. Is there a way to speed that up at all if you use the dried kind?? Or maybe I just don't understand the dried bean process? It bums me, I love them and eat them anyway but ughh....no wonder my cat hates me.<br><br>
Maybe the rice cooker??
 

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Oh ok. When I think of veggi I think of "plant-based." <img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif"><br><br>
100 calories broccoli: 11 grams protein<br>
100 calories spinach: 14 grams of protein<br>
100 calories of lean beef: 10 grams of protein<br>
100 calories of hard boiled egg: 8 grams of protein<br><br>
Of course volume-wise you have to eat more of the broccoli/spinach, but it's a good example of how nutrient-dense it is when you're looking at calories.
 

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A pressure cooker can cook them in almost no time at all. <img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif">
 

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So how does plant protein compare to animal protein.....I'm not sure how to word this so it makes sense.....they are derived from different sources, obviously, since animal protein is basically muscle. When you hear talk of incomplete and complete proteins, what makes a "complete" protein and how do the two affect you nutritionally?? One of protein's main functions is to help build muscle tissue, so how do plant proteins do that as effectively as animal?<br><br>
My body has high protein needs and I'm hypoglycemic which makes it worse....I struggle with a strictly vegetarian diet but I really like to eat healthy. I would love to understand the protein thing better so I can make more modifications to my diet.
 

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It's not speeding things up, but it does allow you to leave them unattended... the crockpot? I also have a cookbook that tells you how to oven-cook beans as well.<br><br>
I'm going to be working on doing this in the near future, since I tend to rely on canned beans for convenience's sake.
 

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Me too. I know there's not really a cost difference since dried ones are so cheap, but I would love to hear what you find. I don't really want to buy another appliance that I have no counter space for, and I know the crockpot will do it, but I make a LOT of soups and stews with beans and lentils and you already spend all day cooking them in the crockpot anyway. I don't normally just make baked beans as a side dish unless I am having BBQ. Mostly I use them in stuff.<br><br>
I'm cornfused-ed!!! <img alt="sad.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/sad.gif">
 

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Most plant-based proteins are not "complete" proteins on their own (soy is one exception), however, if you eat a varied diet then you'll get enough of whatever you need. Proteins do not need to be "combined" in the same meal. Plant based proteins, particularly raw proteins, tend to be much more easily digested by the human body, and less acid-forming.<br><br>
For a really great overview of plant-based nutrition, try reading "Becoming Vegan." Even if you aren't becoming vegan it's an excellent resource. Another good place to look that pertains even more to sports and running nutrition is The Thrive Diet by Brendan Brazier (who is a Canadian ironman and ultramarathon champion). It has lots of good info, and plenty of very healthy, allergen-free, plant-based recipes.
 

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My deal is just plan ahead. Cook a batch of beans one day, and then put them in the fridge, make the soup the next day. I am doing that already with rice, etc.
 

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Cooked beans freeze really well too. You could do a big batch and then freeze them in portioned zip-lock baggies. Or throw them all into a big zip-lock bag and grab them out by the handful as-needed. <img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif">
 

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Hmm...those are great ideas. I'll have to check out that book, too. I doubt I will ever be able to go vegan but I would like more info on the plant nutrition thing. And I am always looking for new recipes to try. Meri, Dia and Altoids have been very helpful with that!!!
 

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You never know. <img alt="wink.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/wink.gif"> You may find after a while you're eating so many great plant-based things that you just don't have room in your diet for anything else! Either way you're doing your body a favour by learning about and incorporating more plant-based nutrition into your diet.<br><br>
Please PM me if you ever require any information or recipes. <img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif">
 

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I soak the beans overnight then cook them when i first wake up in the morning. The beans are ready when i am done my workout. I have also used the pressure cooker and rice cooker. All three are very easy.<br><br>
A vegetarian diet should not aggrivate hypoglycemia, but should have the exact opposite effect. Are you eating lower glycemic foods all together? beans are a perfect source, as are whole grains. When you make your baked goods are you using whole grains and whole wheat flour? I would think cutting out all breads from your diet would help you tremendously with your hypoglycemia. You can still eat carbs, but just ones that are lower glycemic. The more unprocessed the grain, the better for you.<br><br>
I think you will be able to work out your nutritional needs to conquer your hypoglycemia, it's just going to take a lot of time and research and experimenting.<br>
I have never had such balanced blood sugar since cutting out ALL SUGAR and processed & refined food from my diet.
 
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