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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Time to start planning, at least out here. We still have snow on the ground, but I've got a small plot of land we're going to leave for some veggies.<br><br>
So, midwest weather, what can I grow? I was thinking of tomatoes, cucumbers, I'd like bell peppers, but heard they are tough.<br><br>
Of course, we're going to have a bunch of corn... It's Illinois!<br><br>
Ideas, suggestions, tips???
 

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I know nothing about where you are but I have planted rutabaga, kohlrabi, tomatoes, eggplant, japanes eggplant, arugula, spinach, cerano peppers, assorted bell peppers, hot thai peppers, thai basil, rosemary, squash and pineapple! <img alt="biggrin.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/biggrin.gif"> Yippee!
 

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I grew up in the midwest and my mom always had a great garden. We had lots of carrots, beans, beets, tomatos. I have a hard time with bellpeppers - they usually are so small.<br>
I live on the west coast now so we have a different climate for gardening than back in chicago, but I have a big garden and grow lots of stuff that I can for winter consumption. I still have several jars of greens beans, beets and tomato sauce from last years garden. Corn is actually the one thing I can't grow very well out there. have you ever planted potatos? They are not only fun to plant but they would do well in your climate as well.
 

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OH gets similar weather. We grow<br><br>
tomatoes<br>
potatoes (redskins)<br>
cukes<br>
bush beans<br>
zuchini<br><br>
Most of my friends grow bell peppers.
 

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Beets, carrots, radishes (last two a good project with kids), spinach, chard, lettuce, arugula, melons, beans, peas, strawberries (though hard from seed), zucchini (only if you like them as you will have a LOT), tomatoes tomatoes tomatoes.<br><br>
I am also supposed to be growing shallots, onions, garlic and artichoke (the last is a big experiment and will likely fail), cabbage, brussel sprouts, mache, claytonia, watercress, and I'm probably forgetting something. Oh, and basil and parsley.<br><br>
Of course, the only thing I actually have growing right now is the garlic, but I started seeds 10 days ago and most has germinated, yay!
 

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hmm. we have always had ok peppers. one year they were small, but a few years ago we did really well!<br><br>
I started planning and think we will grow:<br>
tomatoes, peppers, basil, carrots, bush beans, soy beans, broccoli, cauliflower, zuchinni, squash, japanese eggplant, brussel sprouts, chard, sweet potatoes, daikon radish<br><br>
i have never grown chard, sweet potatoes, soy beans or daikon before. Should be interesting. I tried brussel sprouts once and it did not work so well, but i am up to try it again!<br><br>
anyone have anyone they prefer to order seeds from?
 

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One of my SO's instructor said:<br><br>
Plant an onion, get an onion. He thought you might just as well buy them <img alt="biggrin.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/biggrin.gif"><br><br>
We usually have:<br><br>
carrots<br>
peas<br>
spinach<br>
swiss chard<br>
tomatoes<br>
green beans<br>
beets<br>
squash (acorn, butternut, etc.)<br><br>
herbs like dill, basil, oregano, sage, rosemary, flat leaf parsley. Most die for us over the winter.<br><br>
eggplant (almost never ripens before the first frost but the flowers are pretty)<br>
peppers (in the greenhouse, because it doesn't get warm enough here otherwise)<br><br>
We have a raspberry patch and wild strawberries all over the yard. Oh, and there's wild blackberries every-damn-where.<br><br>
OH! Sunflowers! Good things even if you don't want the seeds, they're great for the birds.
 

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as far as beets, last year I planted them in very loose loamy type soil and watered them alot. And I got some pretty big beets. Previous years they were much smaller. So, perhaps a trick with beets is a looser soil so they have ample room to grow in there. And roots veggies do need plenty of water.
 

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Pete, I have not succesfully grown beets myself either. I have started golden beets indoors now, because they were supposed to be slow germinators. Not sure if that was a good move, but we shall see. My heavy clay was not good for beets, I'm doing raised beds this year for the first time. And I've read the thing about lots of water (and even watering) as well.<br><br>
Pretty much the only thing I've grown sucessfully is tomatoes, lettuce, arugula, basil and parsley, so this year is a very ambitious plan for me. But I have a deer fence now!
 

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mort get a seed catalogue from a local supplier. Pretty much everything they have in the catalogue should grow in your area. Its typically based on degree days and you can play with your microclimate or increase your chances of growing fringe plants by starting seedlings in your home, using cold frames/green house/cloches, black plastic film, etc. I suspect you'll be good for tomatoes, carrots, parsnips, peas, corn, beans, squash, onions, lettuce, cucumbers, raddishes, cabbage, turnips, beets, etc.<br><br><br>
I (((heart))) seed catalogues. <img alt="biggrin.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/biggrin.gif">
 

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Ooh, my roommate said she has a little vegetable garden in the summers. Maybe she'll let me till a little patch, too!! That would be so fun!
 

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This year is going to be my first attempt at a vegetable garden. The house I'm renting now has a nice fenced in area that I think should be good for keeping all the wild critters out. What are some easier, good yielding crops for a first timer? I'm thinking tomatoes, zuchini, cucumbers and maybe some potatoes, plus a bunch of herbs.
 

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Peas, beetie! You'll get a bazillion and you can start them rather early. They like cooler weather.<br><br>
And green beans. Zucchini are always a good choice if you want a ton.
 

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Intense - the ones you listed as well as what Gingerbread mentioned are good ones for first-timers. They are sort of foolproof. The only tricky thing with tomatos is making sure your soil is balanced. One year I ended up with a lot of blossom end rot because my soil was low in calcium. So generally, the area where I'll plant tomatos, I work in some extra calcium into the soil.
 

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I usually plant tomatos & bell peppers in pots because of all the rabbits. Anybody know what else will grow well in pots? I'd like to branch out into some other things but I don't want to feed all the wild rabbits. <img alt="biggrin.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/biggrin.gif">
 

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Tomatoes and green peppers.<br><br>
I have to plant them in the front yard because of the deer. Our first summer here I found the sunniest spot in the yard, broke sod, tilled the soil, etc. I put up a 'bunnie fence' but somehow the 'bunnies' kept munching. Duh, I planted my garden exactly where the deer walk through the yard. They thought I planted the garden just for them!<br><br>
I plant about 8 tomato plants in a rather cramped area. They do very well. I cage them, and end up tying the cages together and then to the house. We eat tons of tomatoes, give away tons more, and I still can about three cases.<br><br>
The green peppers do fairly well, even though they are in the shade a good part of the afternoon. We get a decent harvest. We tend to cook them into things, rather than eat them raw. From our 4 plants, we get enough for us.<br><br>
I'm lazy and buy my plants. I probably won't plant until sometime in May.<br><br>
btw--the BEST tomatoes we have ever had were volunteers. One year, I got a very late start in tilling the soil. By then, we had enough plants already so I just transplanted 'em. They ended up being a cross between cherry and beef steak. Half the size of beef steak, growing in bunches like cherry. And VERY yummy!!!
 

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Cukes are okay, but can easily get out of control, they grow like wild fire and attach to everything if not trellised right <img alt="biggrin.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/biggrin.gif">
 

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For those with rabbit/deer problems - Head over to the zoo and get some lion poop to use for fertilizer. I know folks who have done this and they say no animals come anywhere near their garden.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Serious question: How the hell does a deer or rabbit know what lion poo smells like?<br><br><br><br>
I found an online catalog, Burpee or something was the first google hit. It sounds like I could go that route, or just head over to the local nursery and let the ladies there help me. They are always very helpful.<br><br>
I'm looking forward to planting. The little 20x40ft piece we are using is fenced in to keep the deer out, fenced in, I'm talking 10ft tall!!!!!!<br><br>
We're going to till soon and get some fresh soil in there, last season the tomatoes and corn did not do so well, and we think it is because there has always been corn and tomatoes on the same spot... year after year.
 
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