Runners Forum - Kick Runners banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,464 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yes I know it's Friday night and most of us have already had a beer/wine/cocktail or two but I actually do have a training question.<br><br>
The athletes in the Hillacious Spinervals DVD had their front risers set on more blocks so the bikes were facing up as if going uphill. Is there an actual benefit to doing this? Curious minds want to know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,149 Posts
Well, here's my thought, not that it's worth much after my "wine or two" (two, three, whatever):<br><br>
That's Hollywood. An extra 3" rise is so trivial as to be all show. To simulate an actual hill, you'd have to have about a 1-foot+ riser, and then you'd never be able to mount your bike.<br><br>
Okay, I've never done Spinervals, nor do I even own a trainer, but (and I think this is a Big But) -<br><br>
I think Spinervals/trainer workouts are great for building strength, but if you want to get good at climbing hills, you MUST climb hills. I just don't think you can simulate that in the garage/basement/attic.<br><br>
edit - Uhhh...so how big are the risers in that video?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,030 Posts
No, I wouldn't think so. The resistance is between the trainer and the wheel, regardless on the frame angle. It ain't no treadmill.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,464 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I absolutely agree with you there but at 5:30 in the morning when it's raining cats & dogs, you take what you can. Alpe de Blooming Fern, Skyline, and Hagg are already in the plans for training rides.<br><br>
Risers lifted the bikes maybe 4 inches if that...<br><br>
That's what my sleep-fogged brain thought this morning. I figure I can get a tougher workout if I put the heavier flywheel on the trainer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
More than increasing the resistance I think its about targeting the muscles differently. Imagine a very tough gear with a steep rise vs. the same tough gear with the bike completely level.....due to different leverage it forces you out of the saddle quicker, like on a hill...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,112 Posts
We discussed this last year on CR. Hey LRR, get off your arse, set the popcorn down, and go find it.<br><br>
I have put the telephone book underneath for a workout. Didn't do much for me. Your body is of course at a differenct angle relative to gravity on a hill, so you could argue that you might as well condition your muscles to this different angle.<br><br>
I ride a lot of hills, and feel the trainer in general does a terrible job at preparing you for when the front wheel raises up on the road. Use the trainer for trainer things, and use hills for hill things.<br><br>
But, if it makes you work harder when your front wheel is up on the coffee table, by all means do it. Oh, and post a picture.<br><br>
-Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,112 Posts
Yeah, I that was the one. I thought there was more in it.<br><br>
You are such a data miner.<br><br>
Anyone else got some other insights?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
while raising your front wheel simulates grade, there is no substitute for being out on the road on a real hill...unless its snowing outside...<img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
CycleOps climbing blocks are stackable and with two it raises your front wheel about a foot. I've seen guys stacking three. Sorry bout the product placement but no risers definitely don't affect how the bike fits in the trainer. The bike just rotates up on the axis of the wheel.<br><br>
Basically, like has been said, the blocks simulate hill climbing. I think it's mainly for the feel of it, but if you do have enough of a riser in front, you'll probably use slightly different muscles as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,205 Posts
you have to at least get the bike level, which is a thick book a 2x4 or something of that ilk. Some people propose jacking the front wheel up a foot to use the muscles on the sides of your ribs more and arms to simulate climbing. I have no clue if the later works, I'm a thick book user, college nutririon is about the proper thickness, or Moby Dick if you prefer fiction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
235 Posts
I think it would be more important for people who do not climb hills regularly-- not for resistance, or gravity or anything, but to help them get in the proper position for climbing. If you've ever been to a spinning class you'll see people who've never ridden a bike outside. And when the teacher has them do a "standing climb," unless they've done it before, or unless the teacher tells them, they stand right up straight, hips over their feet. As you know, when you climb a real hill, your hips are over the saddle. I *think* that adding the risers would help you remember to "climb" (which comes from the trainer resistance, not the risers) with your hips in the proper position.<br><br>
But that's just my guess...<br>
jen
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top