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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,<br><br>
As many of you are aware, this year I will be running the Equinox Marathon again this year. In years past I always ran the Equinox in a pair of Air Pegasus shoes.<br><br>
This year I'm thinking about getting actual trail running shoes for the race, and for the training this summer (I'm going to try to do more trail running this summer to get me ready for the race).<br><br>
When I'm running pavement, I currently wear Mizunos (Wave Rider 9's). I am wondering about trail shoes.<br><br>
So, if you wear trail shoes, which brand do you wear? Has anyone worn the Mizuno trail shoes? If so, did you like them?<br><br>
Thanks!
 

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I wear Brooks Cascadias on road and trail. They are a trail shoe. What is the EQ marathon like as far as terrain?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the response meri.<br><br>
I'll tell you, the terrain varies quite a bit.<br><br>
You start off on a fairly flat, but narrow single-track trail. A lot of tree roots to look out for.<br><br>
There are a few short stretches of pavement in the first 3-4 miles, but for the most part it's single-track trail with a lot of tree roots. Mile 3 and 4 has a few small hills on it, nothing too bad.<br><br>
After that, there is a short stretch of pavement at mile 5.7 to about mile 6.3. After that it's all dirt trail (again fairly flat) until mile 9. At mile 9, you have a dirt road to contend with as you start climbing the mountain (Ester Dome). The course veers off the road at about mile 9.3, and is on a rough trail section until about mile 11.2. Most of that stretch is uphill (of course...you're climbing the mountain). From mile 11.2 to about 12.9, you're back on the dirt road, but you are climbing again.<br><br>
There's a short stretch of very narrow trail getting up to the 1/2 marathon point. Then you start an out and back portion which is essentially on a dirt road. It is very hilly, lots of ups and downs in this segment. When you get back from the out and back, you're at mile 17.1, and you start down the trail to go back down the mountain. It's <b>EXTREMELY</b> steep for about 1/2 a mile. Then it's downhill, but much more gradual until mile 20, and it's all trail until you emerge from the woods onto a dirt road.<br><br>
About 1/2 a mile later, you're on pavement for about a mile.<br><br>
At mile 22 you do another mile underneath high tension power lines. It's a trail that is fairly well packed. That takes you to 23.<br><br>
From 23 to 24.7, you're on pavement.<br><br>
From 24.7 to about 25.75, you're on a hilly trail.<br><br>
From 25.75 to 26, you're on pavement.<br><br>
Then the last .2 of a mile are on a trail.<br><br>
Most of the trails are fairly good. Solid, well packed, not a lot of loose stuff. Just mainly tree roots to deal with (which can be tough because that time of year, the leaves are falling off the trees).<br><br>
Does that tell you what you need to know?
 

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I've got the Mizuno Wave Ascend and the Mizuno Harrier, both are trail shoes and are worth a look. The Ascend (which is now a new model compared to mine) are well cushioned, and pretty grippy unless it's too muddy. My only negative on them is that they have a high profile for a trail shoe and so I wouldn't use them on rough ground, but on dirt trails they are fine, especially if mixed with road sections. The Harriers are lighter and grippier, good for cross country but may lack cushioning for 26 miles of harder trails. I've never raced in the Ascends as they seem heavy compared to the Harrier. Horse for courses though, and they've lasted pretty well so far too.
 

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I really like my Asics Gel Eagle Trail shoes. I don't know if they'll be making any more this coming year, but they are still available. The heel isn't too built up, which is better for technical terrain, the weight is decent, grippy tread, they drain well, and I've found the cushioning a bit nicer than the Cascadias (just my opinion). Only thing that kinda sucks is the lack of toe protection. I was used to Montrails, and you could just about kick a boulder with them and survive. Not so with the Asics.<br><br>
Whatever you decide to purchase, give yourself plenty of time to get acclimated to them.
 
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