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Ok, with all the near death experiences... and death experiences we've read about from time to time.. thought it would be good to start a thread.<br><br>
What do YOU do to keep from turning into roadkill?<br><br>
I'll start<br>
Running<br>
- situational awareness when on roads. Never do a hard interval when there are cars.<br>
- run against traffic<br>
- make eye contact with each and every driver. I wave my arms to get their attention if I don't KNOW they see me. I will even weave into the road a bit (if they're far enough out) to make sure they get it.<br>
- ready to jump into a snowbank/curb at a moments notice.<br>
- wear blinking lights dusk/dark
 

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I slow down/pause at every intersection when biking and running. I never assume the car is going to stop.<br><br>
I try to ride on less busy roads at quieter times like early Sunday morning.<br><br>
If I am running and a car looks like it is hasn't seen me I wave my arms.
 

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No headphones<br>
Wear bright/relective clothes when dark.<br>
Blinking lights<br>
Try and avoid rush hour traffic
 

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I started usin a mirror last year after a friend got run over from behind, I find it really helpful after I got used to it. It's fun to bonk people with my mirror on grup rides also or check if they are rolling their eyes when they agree with something i say.<br><br>
For new riders in urban areas, one of the biggest common dangerous mistakes I see is using the space between the curb and traffic lane to move up when traffic stops. The all time worst move is to move to the indside of a stopped, articulated truck and have the rear wheels come over toward the curb when the truck turns right.
 

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Tying in with the reflective swimsuit thread, I direct you to "<a href="http://400beers.blogspot.com/2007/09/riding-with-sharks.html" target="_blank">Riding With Sharks</a>"
 

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This really is a great topic for all of us to keep in mind at all times. Some of you have heard me say it before, but there is one area that I am very, very concerned about with my own training, and at this point I don't really know what to do besides doing my best to be aware of my surroundings, wear bright colors, and anticipate bad things so that I can act. Let me explain...<br><br>
Toward the end of last season, as I was approaching my second A-race of the year in Clearwater, a race where I rose the bar for myself and would accept nothing less than giving it all with every fiber of my soul, I noticed right away an increased danger in my bike training. I had gotten myself pretty fast compared to where I was a year earlier, and I was noticing things I never did before, like more wind in the face, as if every ride was a windy ride (of course, stoopid, it's because you're now going faster!), and not only that but I also noticed that as I pushed harder and harder on the bike, the number of close calls went up exponentially. No kidding. And it's all because I was much faster than I had been used to. Whereas before I cruised at top speed doing, maybe, 20 mph through intersections, I was hauling ass at 24 to 26, and if I was on a downhill, even a slight one, those speeds were up closer to or even above 30. I wasn't used to the speed. I had stretches of roadway where I'd rally up the hammer meter and fly down a 2-4 mile stretch doing no less than 25 mph.<br><br>
Not only was I not used to the new speed and was coming close to near accidents much more often, but I was also now even more focused in my training and motivated to get even faster. I would push myself extremely hard on these rides; you may remember them. I called them my Super Secret Clearwater Revival jam sessions. And in each, I found myself often with my head down and me hammering away on yet another interval, all the while I was flying through intersections at speeds even more than I was used to.<br><br>
Speed is relative. What might be fast for me may not be for you. But truth is, I was in so many more near close call accidents with that new speed coupled with the precise focus to hold it all together and do myself proud with a kick ass showing at truly a World Championship event.<br><br>
This year I have something that will take me to the next level. I went to Clearwater and averaged 23.24 mph on the bike leg. That number blows me away. But what I have is confidence that I will get stronger and fast, regardless of what that number is, and so the part that scares me is that I will have to be even more focused to achieve my goals and push myself even harder. And I will. I'll do it all in efforts to grasp the dream. But I will also be putting myself in those same close call situations, and when I get faster, their numbers will increase. I try to pick open roads, even two lane highways, to do my quality hammerfests, as those seem to yeild much fewer close calls. But still, I know it will happen again. And again.<br><br>
I've finally come to realize that with speed comes more wind in your face. Now, after a full season, I am used to always having an unbearable wind in my face. But I am not yet used to all of those near misses. Those are for life. My life. They are scary. But I will live life. And try to stay focused but also acutely aware, and I will also try to anticipate the worst. But lapses occur. That's the part that's scary.
 

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This really is a great topic for all of us to keep in mind at all times. Some of you have heard me say it before, but there is one area that I am very, very concerned about with my own training, and at this point I don't really know what to do besides doing my best to be aware of my surroundings, wear bright colors, and anticipate bad things so that I can act. Let me explain...<br><br>
Toward the end of last season, as I was approaching my second A-race of the year in Clearwater, a race where I rose the bar for myself and would accept nothing less than giving it all with every fiber of my soul, I noticed right away an increased danger in my bike training. I had gotten myself pretty fast compared to where I was a year earlier, and I was noticing things I never did before, like more wind in the face, as if every ride was a windy ride (of course, stoopid, it's because you're now going faster!), and not only that but I also noticed that as I pushed harder and harder on the bike, the number of close calls went up exponentially. No kidding. And it's all because I was much faster than I had been used to. Whereas before I cruised at top speed doing, maybe, 20 mph through intersections, I was hauling ass at 24 to 26, and if I was on a downhill, even a slight one, those speeds were up closer to or even above 30. I wasn't used to the speed. I had stretches of roadway where I'd rally up the hammer meter and fly down a 2-4 mile stretch doing no less than 25 mph.<br><br>
Not only was I not used to the new speed and was coming close to near accidents much more often, but I was also now even more focused in my training and motivated to get even faster. I would push myself extremely hard on these rides; you may remember them. I called them my Super Secret Clearwater Revival jam sessions. And in each, I found myself often with my head down and me hammering away on yet another interval, all the while I was flying through intersections at speeds even more than I was used to.<br><br>
Speed is relative. What might be fast for me may not be for you. But truth is, I was in so many more near close call accidents with that new speed coupled with the precise focus to hold it all together and do myself proud with a kick ass showing at truly a World Championship event.<br><br>
This year I have something that will take me to the next level. I went to Clearwater and averaged 23.24 mph on the bike leg. That number blows me away -- I am equally proud of it as I am surprised by it. What I now have is confidence that I will get stronger and faster, regardless of what that number is, and so the part that scares me is that I will have to be even more focused to achieve my goals and push myself even harder. And I will. I'll do it all in efforts to grasp the dream. But I will also be putting myself in those same close call situations, and when I get faster, their numbers will increase. I try to pick open roads, even two lane highways, to do my quality hammerfests, as those seem to yeild much fewer close calls. But still, I know it will happen again. And again.<br><br>
I've finally come to realize that with speed comes more wind in your face. Now, after a full season, I am used to always having an unbearable wind in my face. But I am not yet used to all of those near misses. Those are for life. My life. They are scary. But I will live life. And try to stay focused but also acutely aware, and I will also try to anticipate the worst. But lapses occur. That's the part that's scary.
 

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This really is a great topic for all of us to keep in mind at all times. Some of you have heard me say it before, but there is one area that I am very, very concerned about with my own training, and at this point I don't really know what to do besides doing my best to be aware of my surroundings, wear bright colors, and anticipate bad things so that I can act. Let me explain...<br><br>
Toward the end of last season, as I was approaching my second A-race of the year in Clearwater, a race where I rose the bar for myself and would accept nothing less than giving it all with every fiber of my soul, I noticed right away an increased danger in my bike training. I had gotten myself pretty fast compared to where I was a year earlier, and I was noticing things I never did before, like more wind in the face, as if every ride was a windy ride (of course, stoopid, it's because you're now going faster!), and not only that but I also noticed that as I pushed harder and harder on the bike, the number of close calls went up exponentially. No kidding. And it's all because I was much faster than I had been used to. Whereas before I cruised at top speed doing, maybe, 20 mph through intersections, I was hauling ass at 24 to 26, and if I was on a downhill, even a slight one, those speeds were up closer to or even above 30. I wasn't used to the speed. I had stretches of roadway where I'd rally up the hammer meter and fly down a 2-4 mile stretch doing no less than 25 mph.<br><br>
Not only was I not used to the new speed and was coming close to near accidents much more often, but I was also now even more focused in my training and motivated to get even faster. I would push myself extremely hard on these rides; you may remember them. I called them my Super Secret Clearwater Revival jam sessions. And in each, I found myself often with my head down and me hammering away on yet another interval, all the while I was flying through intersections at speeds even more than I was used to.<br><br>
Speed is relative. What might be fast for me may not be for you. But truth is, I was in so many more near close call accidents with that new speed coupled with the precise focus to hold it all together and do myself proud with a kick ass showing at truly a World Championship event.<br><br>
This year I have something that will take me to the next level. I went to Clearwater and averaged 23.24 mph on the bike leg. That number blows me away -- I am equally proud of it as I am surprised by it. What I now have is confidence that I will get stronger and faster, regardless of what that number is, and so the part that scares me is that I will have to be even more focused to achieve my goals and push myself even harder. And I will. I'll do it all in efforts to grasp the dream. But I will also be putting myself in those same close call situations, and when I get faster, their numbers will increase. I try to pick open roads, even two lane highways, to do my quality hammerfests, as those seem to yeild much fewer close calls. But still, I know it will happen again. And again.<br><br>
I've finally come to realize that with speed comes more wind in your face. Now, after a full season, I am used to always having an unbearable wind in my face. But I am not yet used to all of those near misses. Those are for life. My life. They are scary. But I will live life. And try to stay focused but also acutely aware, and I will also try to anticipate the worst. But lapses occur. That's the part that's scary.
 

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When you said "Defensive Workouts" I was thinking of ways of fighting back if you catch up with that person at a stop light, or if she pulls over (you know... the politically correct way that any fighting technique today is called "self-defense"<img alt="wink.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/wink.gif">.
 

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This really is a great topic for all of us to keep in mind at all times. Some of you have heard me say it before, but there is one area that I am very, very concerned about with my own training, and at this point I don't really know what to do besides doing my best to be aware of my surroundings, wear bright colors, and anticipate bad things so that I can act. Let me explain...<br><br>
Toward the end of last season, as I was approaching my second A-race of the year in Clearwater, a race where I rose the bar for myself and would accept nothing less than giving it all with every fiber of my soul, I noticed right away an increased danger in my bike training. I had gotten myself pretty fast compared to where I was a year earlier, and I was noticing things I never did before, like more wind in the face, as if every ride was a windy ride (of course, stoopid, it's because you're now going faster!), and not only that but I also noticed that as I pushed harder and harder on the bike, the number of close calls went up exponentially. No kidding. And it's all because I was much faster than I had been used to. Whereas before I cruised at top speed doing, maybe, 20 mph through intersections, I was hauling ass at 24 to 26, and if I was on a downhill, even a slight one, those speeds were up closer to or even above 30. I wasn't used to the speed. I had stretches of roadway where I'd rally up the hammer meter and fly down a 2-4 mile stretch doing no less than 25 mph.<br><br>
Not only was I not used to the new speed and was coming close to near accidents much more often, but I was also now even more focused in my training and motivated to get even faster. I would push myself extremely hard on these rides; you may remember them. I called them my Super Secret Clearwater Revival jam sessions. And in each, I found myself often with my head down and me hammering away on yet another interval, all the while I was flying through intersections at speeds even more than I was used to.<br><br>
Speed is relative. What might be fast for me may not be for you. But truth is, I was in so many more near close call accidents with that new speed coupled with the precise focus to hold it all together and do myself proud with a kick ass showing at truly a World Championship event.<br><br>
This year I have something that will take me to the next level. I went to Clearwater and averaged 23.24 mph on the bike leg. That number blows me away -- I am equally proud of it as I am surprised by it. What I now have is confidence that I will get stronger and faster, regardless of what that number is, and so the part that scares me is that I will have to be even more focused to achieve my goals and push myself even harder. And I will. I'll do it all in efforts to grasp the dream. But I will also be putting myself in those same close call situations, and when I get faster, their numbers will increase. I try to pick open roads, even two lane highways, to do my quality hammerfests, as those seem to yeild much fewer close calls. But still, I know it will happen again. And again.<br><br>
I've finally come to realize that with speed comes more wind in your face. Now, after a full season, I am used to always having an unbearable wind in my face. But I am not yet used to all of those near misses. Those are for life. My life. They are scary. But I will live life. And try to stay focused but also acutely aware, and I will also try to anticipate the worst. But lapses occur. That's the part that's scary.
 

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Thor, Thor, Thor, Thor, there's some kind of echo in here, here, here, here <img alt="wink.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/wink.gif"><img alt="wink.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/wink.gif"><img alt="wink.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/wink.gif"><img alt="wink.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/wink.gif"><br><br>
I try to plan my routes so that I have to take the fewest number of chances. I keep my runs to paths, backroads, etc. I always run on the side of the road facing traffic and pick roads that have plenty of room to jump out of the way. When I bike, I pick routes where I don't have to cross any highways unless it's at a light. I pick roads that have enough of a shoulder. I avoid left turns and try to make loops that go clockwise.<br><br>
I am lucky to have all that around here. Where there isn't that, I just don't go.<br><br>
And if the weather is bad, I stick with my dreadmill. It's not because I don't like running in the rain or even the snow. I don't like driving in it and it's hard to see. If I have trouble seeing so does the next guy. I don't want to be the one not being seen because someone's windshield wipers don't work well or getting run over because the road is slippery. It's not worth the chance.
 

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<b><i>"Tips for Defensive Workouts"</i></b><br><br>
Forgot to mention: At first I thought this thread was about how to sandbag a brutal workout without having your coach/trainer kill you.
 

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Very important topic. More than half of my miles on a weekly basis is done int eh early morning, like many of you. Outside of everything else that has been listed, by running the same route around the same time you start to learn the locals and I have found that to be a great help. Also, since I normally run with others you will be surprised how the voices carry which helps also.
 

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For the life of me, I can't figure out how to delete all but the last post! I hit the Edit/Delete button but don't see that little Delete check box. Maybe it's a problem remnant of the original reason my post got listed 4 times.
 

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My Tip of the Day: Don't step off of the curb into the path a rapidly moving bus.<br><br>
Two mornings ago, as I was running on the sidewalk in the same direction as traffic, I came upon a group of 6 or 7 people waiting at a bus stop. Most of them were standing on the sidewalk, so rather than force them to move onto the wet, muddy grass I figured that I'd just run in the bike lane for 50 feet or so to get past them. Fortunately, I thought to look over my shoulder to check for any bikes coming from behind. Just as I turned my head to look back and made the first step towards the bike lane, a bus came roaring past and whipped into the bike lane right where I would have stepped next.<br><br>
I rarely run in the same direction as traffic, even on the sidewalk. It's really just this one short stretch near my house where it's easier to do so.
 

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Or if someone drives by you on your bike and yells "hey fatty! Mooo!"<br><br>
I know it was stupid, but I almost chased a guy down who did that last summer. He got lucky that the light turned before I caught him. I was going to freak the fuck out on him. <img alt="biggrin.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/biggrin.gif">
 

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thor, you can't delete posts here, but you can edit them and type in something like "oops, duplicate post" or something.
 

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Shoulders? There are roads with shoulders? We definately don't have any of those around here-- you have to share the same 12 feet with the guy in the pick-up pulling the boat on a trailer-- oh, and there's the side mirrors that stick out about 18" on each side....<br><br>
the joy...<br><br>
JR- do you use a helmet-attached mirror, or one that attaches to your bike?<br><br>
jen
 
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