Runners Forum - Kick Runners banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
998 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, First time I am posting here, I used to lurk in the Boomers on CR every once in a while. I am kind of upset at my poor training run times these days. I cannot decide whether it's the cold, New England weather, or if it's my age that is starting to show (I am turning 48 next week). But I am training for Boston and have more aches and pains than I can ever remember. And it's marathon #35. No injuries, thank goodness. I have really never had a running injury in 20 years of running. But I am upset about it, I admit. I have never been out there taking so many walking breaks and being disappointed at myself for taking them. Any words of wisdom or anything to share?<br>
(I hope this is not arrogant; definitely not meant to be.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
757 Posts
Hi icecream! Welcome to masters! There are lots of knowledgable folks in here that are dealing with just what you are talking about. I think you will get lots of information and support in here. Personally I am slow as molasses in part because of age, talent and I don't train quite enough. I don't do well running every day as my recovery time takes twice as long as it did 10 years ago. I am turning 60 in a few weeks. My main goal is to run uninjured and just enjoy the gift at whatever pace it may be. Good luck on your goals and please participate. Larry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
586 Posts
Icecream,<br>
I'd say take a week of all recovery runs, you still have plenty for your Boston. Double check your diet needs, is everything in balance? Are you getting enough sleep? Only eat one scoop instead of two on the beautiful and delicious ice cream, or make it non-fat yofurt or sorbet. How much alcohol intake lately?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,426 Posts
Never really had a running injury in 20 years, Ice Cream? You better turn tail and RUN! You won't like what you read here.<br><br>
Okay, I'm yanking your chain. <span style="font-size:xx-small;">A little. 20 years, eh? I'm envious!!!<br><br><span style="font-size:small;">I'm guessing it's mostly a case of the Winter Blues. Thirty-five marathons and all the training that entails over 20 years, sure, you're going to have a few aches and pains, esp if you're talented enough to be running Boston.<br><br>
Tell us more about your training over the last while. Do you ever take a real break from training? Have you ever taken something like a running holiday in the sense that you run for pure enjoyment -- no watch, no HRM? Or maybe run trails instead of pounding out miles on the road?<br><br>
I'll join Larry in welcoming you here. I'm about your age and have been running 20 years or so too (with several gaps doing things not nearly as healthy). Unlike you, the past year was one where I had plenty of injuries -- some overtraining, one trail-related -- so I'll be interested to learn more about how you train.<br><br>
Hang in there. I bet there's an answer other than <i>just</i> age. <img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif"> (Besides, 48 isn't old. <span style="font-size:xx-small;">Is it?</span>)<br></span></span>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
998 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
<br>
I have always kept my weight down to 18.5-19% BMI. (still there) Besides, i suspect I am just lucky with regards to genes. I only took 6 weeks off from running in the entire 20 years because I broke a toe, walking into my house. I never really tried to do any speedwork. That is where I have given the credit for no injuries. I hop you are right about the weather. No running today..., just shopping. That shouls help a bit, I hope.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
Hey Ice Cream - Bitterroot is reflecting my own experience (RTBR - I turned 60 last June). It's partly age. Also, from my own experience, you may be paying for 20 years of running without an injury. I am writing this not knowing what your training regimen is, but 35 marathons in 20 years suggests that what I am about to write may be true.<br><br>
Injuries force the runner to rest. They may prevent us from running a particular race we have trained hard for, but they also allow for the muscles to recover. Whether we like to admit it or not, exercise can induce apoptosis (programmed cell death) in muscles. This is a long story and I won't try to explain it all, but simply put, stress (both mental and physical) initiates activity in the molecular pathways inside the cell that are involved in killing the cell. That doesn't mean that they <b>will</b> kill the cell because there are counter mechanisms that stop the activity unless the stress becomes more than the protective mechanisms can cope with. Day in and day out training can overcome the protective mechanisms and some of the muscle cells will die. Since muscle cells don't divide to form new muscle cells, once one goes you are one short. Eventually that takes it's toll. I know that that is a dismal answer and not what you wanted to hear, but you really do have to adjust training as you get older.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
757 Posts
There is some good info in Tim Noakes "LORE OF RUNNING" on aging and how it effects athletic performance and training. I think the "Competive Runners Handbook" has some good information on age adjustments to race times based on age which would probably be a more accurate reflection of your performance. Jeff Galloway's new book "RUN TELL YOU ARE A HUNDRED", though a rehash on his older books is probably a good read to atleast gain some perspective and there is info in adjusting training based on age.<br><br>
As per Sans Succi, I think this winter weather has an effect on running, I know it does mine. I just don't want to run long distances this winter as it has been a long snowy winter. The running is more difficult for me and it makes me sore, that combined with my love for the outdoors and refusing to use the treadmill except for rare occassions forces me to make adjustments to my pace and distance. Still the running remains pleasurable and suits my needs.<br><br>
I would certainly like to hear more on Oldgray's cell death thing, it sounds pretty interesting. This along with Noake's info on empty muscle cell tubes brings a question to my mind as far as body fat measurements. A fibrous muscle mass might skew the observed body fat measurement in such away that it would appear that the body fat was higher than it actually is.<br><br>
Depression is another factor both in age and how it effects our running. I deal with that and use medication in part to treat it. Normally winter is bad for me because of the lack of light. This effects the joy that I experience in running.<br><br>
Larry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,455 Posts
Iron supplements and a cut back week. While out shopping buy yourself some frivolous stuff. That's my prescription. Good luck in Boston! <img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
561 Posts
Listen to <b>Ilene</b>. She knows all <img alt="notworthy.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/notworthy.gif">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
998 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks, Ilene. It's funny that you mention iron supplements, because it occurred to me a week ago that I had forgotten to take them for about 3 months. That is what going on a trip does to you.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top