Runners Forum - Kick Runners banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,496 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I was surfing the <a href="http://www.swimplan.com" target="_blank">SwimPlan</a> site that CiGar posed. It's seems pretty cool.<br><br>
I was surprised, however, that the workouts are made up of so many short segments. I tend to do at least 200 or 300 yards at a time. When we swim in open water in the summer, it's across the lake (either ~1/4 or ~1/2 mile depending on the lake) before a rest so I just figured...<br><br>
When you do a 1500 yard workout (or longer) is it made up of 25, 50, and 100 yard segments with 10-20 second rests in-between? Or do you go longer?<br><br>
Is this a difference between a "swimmer's" workout and a "triathlete's" workout?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,190 Posts
For sure swimmer vs Tri<br><br>
I rarely do anything less than 50. 50 and 75's and rare. 100/200/300/400/800 are the norm and the 800's only during my 3000-4000yd workouts
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,914 Posts
1!<br><br>
The intervals serve a very good purpose. They are typically intended to reinforce form or help you work on getting it better, increase speed, and a host of other things. But since we're triathletes, you can probably just do longer intervals, like as RonBo says, nothing shorter than 50 yards.<br><br>
Still, I think you can learn a lot from those workouts and scale them to meet your needs. Or go to another place for workouts more tailored to triathlon swimming.<br><br>
With that said, I would imagine that swimming, like running, will eventually get to the point where you are so proficient that you have to do the small things in order to get to the next level. And that might include pushing yourself hard on 25 yards to build your top-end speed, much like you would run 200 meter repeats at all out to push your top-end speed in running, which coupled with longer intervals will no doubt bump your overall speed and comfort and recovery ability.<br><br>
For the meantime, I'm guessing you're good with 50, 100, 200, 300, and 400 length intervals.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,062 Posts
I mix it up. I usually swim 2000-2500 meters. That's a 500 warm up, and then a mix of long and short sets. I like to work with descending distances (400, 300, 200, 100) - sometimes break those up - 400, then 2x200; 300 then 2x150... in which case the longer set would be recovery, the two shorter ones would be moderate or fast.<br><br>
Then, every once in a while I go in and do 15x100s. (I haven't in a while).<br><br>
Even when I do a long, straight swim, I'll break it up in my mind, every 3rd 100 fast. I think the pickups are important not only to get the heart beating a little faster, but to make sure I'm not getting lazy in my form.<br><br>
I don't know if swimmers would do more short sets than triathletes. Maybe they do, because most of their events are shorter distances than most triathlon swim distances. And, maybe the shorter sets with more speed and kicking are what they need - triathletes are taught not to kick too much, since we have to save our legs for the bike and run.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,306 Posts
Right now I'm doing a bunch of drills so lots of 50s and 100s. I'm building to 150s and 200s of stroke with 10 seconds rest. I'm not very efficient in the water, I can swim my race distance but I'm slow. Working on drills and repeats I'm hoping will help me this summer with speed AND endurance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,245 Posts
LRR, et.al.,<br><br>
Below is my WO from this AM. One thing about swimming long is that you get tired, your form goes to hell, and then you are reinforcing bad habits. Conversely, shorter intervals reinforce swimming correctly (or as correctly as you can). Then drills help with swimming more correctly. So my workouts are generally like the one below. 50's 100's 200's and 400's are all common. Once in a while I'll do an all out 3x300 as a bench mark. And also once in a while a straight 1.2M in the pool. And of course as you said, in open water I just swim across the lake (and practice sighting and swimming straight).<br><br>
Craig<br>
-----<br><br>
Did my first Swimplan w/o. 2100 yds. I included the time trial which I knew would be 5min for 250 yds. in place of the warm up. Had no fins or paddles either. Still good.<br><br><b>Warm up</b><br><img alt="" src="http://www.swimplan.com/assets/dot.gif" style="border:0px solid;"> • 2 x 100yd Any Stroke (even pace), rest 0:20 / 100yd Swim your choice of stroke at a steady pace.<br><b>Build up (repeat 4 times)</b><br><img alt="" src="http://www.swimplan.com/assets/dot.gif" style="border:0px solid;"> • 1 x 50yd Freestyle Breath Left, rest 0:15 / 50yd Freestyle swim, breathing only on your left side.<br>
• 1 x 50yd Freestyle Breath Right, rest 0:15 / 50yd Freestyle swim, breathing only on your right side.<br><b>Core</b><br>
• 3 x 200yd Freestyle Swim, rest 0:20 / 200yd<br>
• 3 x 200yd Freestyle Swim with paddles and fins, rest 0:20 / 200yd <b><br>
Warm down</b><br><img alt="" src="http://www.swimplan.com/assets/dot.gif" style="border:0px solid;"> • 1 x 100yd Freestyle Easy, rest 0:20 / 100yd Freestyle swim at a slow, relaxed pace.<br>
• 1 x 100yd Easy Any Stroke, rest 0:20 / 100yd Swim your choice of stroke, at a slow, relaxed pace.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
744 Posts
I don’t always know when I’m going to get to the pool. But, it’s usually only once or twice per week. So, I have three different workouts and I just rotate them as I do get to the pool. Each is with an easy quarter-mile warm-up and cool-down for a total of about distance of about a mile and a half:<br>
- A mile’s worth of 100s (on 2 min interval (or about :45 sec rest);<br>
- A mile’s worth of quarters (on 9 min interval (or about 2:00 min rest);<br>
- A continuous mile.<br><br>
Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,055 Posts
This month's USMS (United States Masters Swim?) magazine discussed this exact topic for triathletes. It doesn't look the article is available on line, so here is a quote that is applicable to our discussion;<br><br>
"John says workouts for triathletes should include power, speed, and endurance sets, with intervals. Power sets should be a mainstay. Interval training sets should allow swimmers to repetitively work up to lactate threshold and then recover. He suggets 20x50 on :60 seconds - one hard, one easy, two hard, one easy... to finve hard, one easy. Speed sets can be valuable for the slower swimmer, such as a 16x25 on :30 seconds - three hard, one easy for four rounds. Endurance sets are another mainstay, John says. 400, 600, 800 free descending separated by 2x125 active recovery, all on a fairly tight interval, will keep swimerrs from recovering too much. I believe bare band pulling should be included, particularly in the endurance sets, because it approximates wet suit swimming."<br><br>
So, in short, we should do short and long.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,481 Posts
Also keep in mind that there are different specialists in swimming.<br><br>
So, on a single swim team, the sprinters will do a different set of main sets than the distance swimmers. Everyone will do some work on strokes,...it just depends on what the focus is for each particular group of swimmers for a season or part of a season.<br><br>
You would likely see more similarity in the workout "recipes" for distance swimmers and triathletes than "generic" swimmers and triathletes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,149 Posts
I like short intervals with brief rest periods as a way to get a good feel for efficient swimming. When I do longer sets, I really notice the sloppier form.<br><br>
One of my favorite sets is a ladder, starting with 25 yards and increasing to 100, then back down. Try to keep good form and a strong pace for all of them. Rest for about 30 seconds between each swim.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,464 Posts
My sets are usually 100/200/300s with 15-30 sec rest intervals. I do 25 & 50 on occasion but usually as all out sprints when I'm working on speed. These days, I'm only doing speedwork 1X/month in the pool but I will be increasing that as I reach peak.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,855 Posts
Question on those times - if you're slower than those times, do you just simply up the time and then work from there?<br><br>
For me, it's only recently that I've been come close to 30 seconds on a 25. Should I go for 35's and do 16 of those and then as the speed (hopefully) improves, move down to 30's?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,245 Posts
yup. just add 5 sec or 10 sec per lap. or more.<br>
imo it's better to rest and swim well, than to thrash to stay on time.<br>
they say swimming is 70% technique and 30% strength and fitness.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top