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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Strides, striders, stride-outs.<br><br>
Whatever you call them, I ask the question: How do you do it?<br><br>
I don't believe there is one specific way, but the intent is to work on leg turnover for a brief duration or distance. I'm curious on how others do it, but I will share my techinique here for the group.<br><br>
Typically, 1-2 times per week, I do strides <i>after</i> an easy run as a cool-down. I use school's grass field near my house, the street, or my favorite spot on the HS football field (because is has the yard lines.)<br><br>
How I do them is to find approximately 120 meters (or yards) and divide the distance into four 30 yd increments. My idea for strides is not to change speeds abruptly, rather, apply an incremental increase in speed until running at max turnover. Likewise, I do not stop abruptly, rather I slow to a walk before stopping. It goes something like this:<br><br>
1st 30 yds: fast jog<br>
2nd 30 yds: faster run<br>
3rd 30 yds: all out<br>
Last 30 yds: slow to a walk<br><br>
Then I walk it out for about 30 seconds, full recovery, before starting the next rep.<br><br>
Performing 4-6 strides after an easy run adds about 5-7 minutes to my workout and I find that this activity is one of the best investments of my time.<br><br>
For my time, strides provide multiple benefits, not only with leg turnover. I found that strides improve flexibility through the range of motion. Alos, if I am dinged up, I found that strides identify the location of any leg soreness. Mentally, I've discovered that even after a crummy run that a set of strides can turn a bad run into a positive experience.<br><br>
That all said, there are many ways to do strides and I'm curious as to how others perform their strides. I look forward to the discussion.
 

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I don't usually go to any field or special location, but towards the end of my run I'll do the streetlight to streetlight thing, or maybe for 20-30 seconds. I definitely agree with being smooth about the changing of speeds too.<br><br>
A fun little fartlek sort of deal I found from Daniels' book that can take a serious chunk of time, maybe around 2 miles for some people. Go 5 strides hard, then 5 easy, then 10 hard and 10 easy...up to like 50 strides by increments of 5 and back down. (BTW a stride for me = 2 steps.) Definitely an interesting workout.
 

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So, are striders something you should work in once a week or so or is it dependent on the distance you're training for?
 

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Great thread! I don't do strides very often, but when I do I always wonder if I'm doing them properly.<br><br>
My approach is not too scientific, basically use 30 seconds to go from walking to max speed as smoothly as possible, and then back to a walk. I like the pole to pole idea.<br><br>
I have had to do them on the treadmill, too, which works OK if I start the mill from slow walking pace, because it takes it a while to get up to max speed and then back down. It feels awkward to be pressing the buttons to enter the slow speed from an all-out pace, though. I definitely prefer doing strides outside.
 

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They way roots describles them is the most common way - 80 -120 meters<br><br>
The "all out" usually means "without straining" - Its not your 100 meter speed - but it is a sprint<br><br>
I also do them on the road 4-6 the last mile of 1-2 runs a week - but often I will do them progressively faster - start at 5k speed and then end with the final 1 or 2 all out and go back to easy pace jog in between.<br><br>
It is fun to do them on a nice football or soccer field - Football - end zone to end zone - taking the 1st 50-60 meters to ramp up and then float to the next end zone.<br><br>
I think these are specially a good idea for me during base building as I am doing a lot of miles @ easy pace and it allows the legs to fell some speed without causing much strain.<br><br>
On other easy runs - I will do a mile or 1/2 mile fast finish @ 5k or 10k pace, but do the last bit close to all out. Again some fast running without much strain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
For marathoning (which I think you are doing,) I'd recommend doing strides at least once per week. Not more than 2x week.<br><br>
I can't speak from experience, but I believe the shorter distance racers and sprinters do strides and repetitions more frequently than 2x/week.<br><br>
Good luck, and let us know how it goes. Give it a few weeks before coming to any conclusions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Fartleks are less structured running, but normally part of a longer run. A common definition for fartlek = speed play.<br><br>
Some runners do strides in the middle of a normal run. Some, like Flounder, at the end of their run. And others like me, do it after the run as a cool-down.<br><br>
Generally speaking, striders are shorter than fartleks. As Flounder mentioned, most common technique is 80-120 meters.<br><br>
Good luck, and I hope to hear how folks start to implement strides into their running repertoire.
 

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Good post!<br><br>
However I would question the value of doing 'striders'<br>
(known as run throughs or progressive run throughs in this part of the world)<br>
after your main training session.<br>
They have much more benefit when done before your main session.
 

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Ziggy-<br>
I'm on your line of thought. I guess if you have limited time and are not doing any repitition workouts in your periodization for longer races (ie marathons, ultras), is the closest you will get to working on turnover. Interesting thought about doing before workout, it does make sense. If cadence is a problem, is your body going to remember and repeat the "imprint" 5 minutes before a run or 24 hours before the next workout?? I have to wonder if it's a fear of injury with cold muscles. And then, you wonder if there are actually more injuries doing this on muscles that aren't properly warmed-up or muscles that are already fatigued. I would have never thought to do striders before a workout, yet before a race everyone does them. It really does make sense.<br><br>
hahaoya- yes and no to striders lengthening your stride. Anytime you run faster, your stride does get longer, cadence should be static. So, IMHO, the answer is no, you do striders to work on cadence. If you are working on lenghtening your stride, you are overstriding....which should be left in a whole different workout---if at all.
 
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