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<p>I haven't used the HRM in quite a while... And actually never seriously used it in training (just on occasional runs). But now, as I'm gonna run less over the next few months, I thought it would be great to make each run count, and started wearing the HRM over the past couple of weeks. I gotta say my runs felt more... purposeful (?). And I realized I was kinda wasting my time on many runs, since I wasn't putting up the required effort. Maybe that's why my 5K have been so disappointing this year...</p>
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<p>Anyway, as I said, I never did serious HRM training. So what should be the targets? What % should I be able to maintain on long runs? What about tempo runs? What do you hit on intervals?</p>
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<p>Thanks!</p>
 

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<p>It might be a better approach for you to do some structured running and observe your heartrate and then take that knowledge and use it when doing road or trail runs.  For example, the heart rate you settle into during a 10K race is a little more that threshold.  You should run a 5K and see how much higher it goes.   If you take your race times and look in a book like Daniels running Formula, you can then get some targets for track intervals.  Do the intervals at the correct timed pace, but note also how your heart responds.</p>
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<p>The problem with heartrate is it is a bit laggy, in that it takes a few minutes for HR to reflect the work you are doing, so running 400's based on heart rate isn't too useful.  For 20 minute tempo runs or distance workouts, it's a good indicator.</p>
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<p>Be aware that dehydration over a long run can cause the HR to increase, even if your pace is decreasing.</p>
 

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<p>Not an expert, by any means, but here is my 2 cents...</p>
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<p>I used to never use a HRM during any kind of training.  However, I did start using one last year as I was coming back from and injury and used it to help with my base training and keep me from going out too fast too soon and getting reinjured.  I was fortunate enough to have my coach establish my zones early on and then we adjusted them after I had a few races under my belt.</p>
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<p>I highly recommend figuring out your approximate zones and using them as a guide for all your runs, whether they are base or threshold.</p>
 
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