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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
<p> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"><span style="font-size:18px;"><strong>RR IMKY</strong></span></p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">The short:</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">S: 1:32:21</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">B: 7:59:09</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">R: iDNF</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"><span style="font-size:16px;"><b>OUT OF BOUNDS</b></span></p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">The swim started off well, until the turn around point. I was swimming along just great at about a 1:20/100 pace. I had just rounded the turn around buoy on the north of the Island when I looked up and I discovered I had been sucked out in to the main channel of the river about 1000yds or so from the buoys.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">I didn't see any kayaks out there making sure people made the turn ok, so maybe that's something they should work on.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">Once I discovered just how far I was from the swim course, I decided the best course of action was to aim for the farthest buoy I could see and swim as fast and as hard as I could. I ended up rejoining the course just before the I-65 bridge which is about ½ of a mile from transition. It was frustrating because I knew this down stream course would give me a really great swim time...and it did for the course I actually swam, just not the one I was timed for. So, with that in mind I swam a 1:32:21.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">I didn't really have time to reflect on the fact that my goal swim time of 1:10 or under was not going to happen, I just knew that If I didn't kick it into high gear and get back to the course I was going to be out there forever. I'm glad, I didn't really think about it because going into the bike demoralized would have made a brutal bike course even worse.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"><span style="font-size:16px;"><b>T1, or how to use a broken zipper.</b></span></p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">The mechanical problems begin. One of my goals for my transitions was to get them under 5 minutes. T1 did not happen that way. As I was putting on my bike jersey, in my exuberance, I broke the zipper. So, after asking around for a leatherman or something to pull it up, I gave up, got my bike and ran to the mechanics tent in transition. They did have a pliers and got the zipper all the way up. As I grabbed my bike one of the mechanics said, “oh yeah, I put your chain back on for you.” Little did I know this was only the beginning of the bike mechanical issues.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"><span style="font-size:16px;"><b>The Bike</b></span></p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"><strong>Or, my own little version of hell on earth.</strong></p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">I started biking well, I was taking in large amounts calories and hydrating well. My body was happy and my speed was picking up. I was doing really well and making up time on the first flat section of the course. The temperatures were still in the 80s and I was looking forward to the bike and the hilly course I knew was made for my style of climbing.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">I had caught up with a lot of people that were ahead of me, and as we climbed the first big hill going to Goshen we came upon a traffic jam. Both sides of the road were at a standstill packed with cars, we only had about 8” of road to bike on. And as I was biking slowly and carefully up the hill, to avoid falling into the ditch or hitting the car's mirrors, someone up ahead must have had some trouble as they slowed way down almost to a stop.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">I was not happy about this. Stopping on a hill, 8” from a ditch, on a road full of cars, is not a kind thing to do to the dozens of people trying to climb behind you. They soon got going again but we all had to start with almost zero speed grinding our way up the hill. I got the top and started a short descent, it wasn't much maybe 20 feet, when while trying to avoid car mirrors I hit a big, jagged, pothole.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">I looked down and saw my rear tire was now almost flat at not even mile 15 into the race. Another long climb had begun at that point and, to keep from holding up the rest of the race, I climbed about half way up to a driveway where I hopped off. Immediately I started loosening the valve cap and as soon as I did I heard a hiss of air. I kept unscrewing and my tube's valve came out with the cap! I couldn't believe it. The pressure spike caused by that pot hole actually forced the valve to come out of the stem! I was really stumped.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">Do I get out the tube, and change it or do I try to force the valve back in and re inflate? I decided, there were lots of people around, I'm sure if it came down to it, some one would help me out with a CO2 cartridge if it didn't work. All I had to screw it back in were my bare hands and as I tightened it as much as I could I re inflated the tire and it held. I was relived!</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">I hopped back on and pedaled up the rest of the hill. I had lost a few minutes both to the traffic jam and the tire fiasco, so I was desperate to make up time. I pedaled hard and soon made it to the out and back section. The down hill portion of the bike was wonderful. I maxed out my gears and rode down as aerodynamically as I could. As I was biking down I looked at my bike computer and it was off. I tried pushing a few buttons but, it was dead, completely. I was biking on feel, without a watch, or MPH estimates. This was going to be interesting...</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">I started the long climb up out of the gorge, and what I thought was going to be a terrible climb turned out to be nothing more than a 5 minute hill. The two biggest hills that were on the course I had just completed and they were easy! I was feeling good and despite the setback was pretty certain I would get my goal 5:45hr bike time. Of course, I wouldn't know until I got back to transition if I had or not.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">I reached the turnaround point and descended into and up out of the the gorge. Back on easy rolling terrain and I started to pick up speed. As I was coming back from the out and back section I started to feel really really hot, as best I could tell it was only 10am and I couldn't believe how hot I was! I got back on RT 42 headed toward the first loop.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">As I hit the right hand turn that would put me on the road to begin the first loop I knew I was heading into net uphill steep rolling terrain. The more I climbed, it seemed, the more I had to climb. I was getting really really hot and I was out of fluids; there was no air movement in this section of the course and it felt like I was in an oven.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">Finally I see the big county water tower and know that I'm only a few miles from La Grange, the big spectator spot on the course. At this point I was dying, I needed fluids and I needed calories and I was out of both, it was hot, I was overheating and I didn't know what to do. About a mile further up the road was only the second aid station on the course, at about mile 35.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">I refilled with Ironman Perform and took two bottles of water, one to drink and one to soak myself with, they had no nutrition... I discovered a way to squirt the water through my helmet holes and just that one little act cooled me down enough that I could once again crank up the pace. I had still had no idea how fast I was going only that I was going as fast as I could without overheating.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">It's hard to explain just how hot it felt, there was not a cloud in the sky and so much humidity the sweat just dripped off.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">As I came into La Grange, I saw my girlfriend, sister and her friends, it was a good boost to see them out there, and I was impressed that they braved the heat! Mile 40 came and went, at this point, I had no performance metrics other than the mile markers every 10 miles and the angle of the sun in the sky, it was rudimentary but it was all I had. At around mile 45 I figured It was somewhere around 12pm and that I would have to seriously hammer if I had any chance of getting off this course in a reasonable time.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">At about the same place in the course I started a series of climbs on this tiny back road that were so deceptive, they looked short, and they were, but they were at impossible grades. You'd start up one only to realize, all that momentum you'd built up going down hill still wasn't enough to get you even ½ way up these 20 or 30ft climbs. I looked ahead and I saw 1, 2, 3 bikers fall down like domino's because they couldn't clip out in time to keep themselves from falling. These hills were not fun. Luckily, these only lasted a few miles.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">I was getting really hungry and, as always I was so thirsty, I couldn't think about anything else except getting to the aid station 2 miles away. It took forever, even though the terrain was only mildly hilly. I knew I was in trouble, because this was supposedly a really easy section of the course.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"><span style="font-size:16px;"><b>The Aid Station</b></span></p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">When I got to the aid station I filled up my one big bottle, took 3 waters(one to wash down gels, the others to pour on myself), packed my jersey full with ice and tried to find some salt tabs to stave off the cramping that had begun to set in a few miles earlier. They had no salt tabs but I knew I was in serious trouble and without salt I was in real danger. I was not going on without it.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">A kind lady ran up to her house and grabbed her salt shaker so I could put some in my drinks. This aid station took forever, and triage was going on all around me. There were bikers down everywhere, some didn't want to go on, some just wanted to find a tree and sit in the shade, no one there was in any shape to continue biking. People were lingering I'm sure because it was the last bit of support for the next 20 miles and in that heat, during that cloudless, humid day, 20 miles was a Herculean task to do self supported. I finished up and continued on. Only a few more hills and I was back on 42 heading for loop two.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"><span style="font-size:16px;"><b>The Wounded Puppy</b></span></p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">By now it was HOT! My skin burned, my head hurt, and I was out of fluids once again, this time out of food too. I had crippling hunger. All I wanted was food, any food, and I knew that it was a bad, bad sign and meant I was going to be out of energy very soon. This began what I like to call the wounded puppy stage; A time during this race from about mile 50 to mile 80 when everything went wrong; and I was hurting so much all I could do was whimper like a wounded puppy while I kept pedaling, hoping it would eventually get better.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">It was about this time that I dropped my chain. Talk about adding insult to injury, I also realized, I would keep dropping my chain until I adjusted the derailleur. I had to do it, I needed my big AND small ring so, another 5 minutes wasted and I got back on the road.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">After that I went from crippling hunger to straining to pedal downhill. All I wanted, all I needed was energy, and liquids. It hurt, bad! I survived though, and made it to the aid station. This time I took one water(to pour) two Perform's and two gels. This, I thought, would get me to the next aid station just after the uphill section on loop two.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">Soon I was on loop two heading back to La Grange, moving slowly but surely towards the aid station after the stuffy, uphill hotbox that was that section of the course. During a climb I happened to look down at my crank and good thing too! My left crank arm was about to come off! I got off the bike, got my Allen wrench set out and got to work re assembling and tightening my left crank arm. At this point I was rather amused, the stripped out crank arm had at least given me something to take my mind off the weather. For all I knew I would be out here pedaling endlessly around, loop after loop for eternity, and any distraction was welcomed. Crank reassembled I hopped on and finished the climb. In to the aid station I refilled and refueled, it was welcomed.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">As I came through La Grange for the second time, I started to feel a whole lot better. My energy was back, my focus was back, I was feeling somewhat hydrated and I could climb with some power and descend with some speed. From La Grange to the aid station at 76 or so, I regained my strength.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">At the aid station I re tightened my left crank arm as it had started to work loose again...I repacked myself with ice, hosed myself down, refilled, refueled and went on my way. From now on I started to see more and more bike carnage; bodies and bikes strewn about the ditches in desperate attempts to escape the heat and forget about the race. Everyone was walking the hills except for me. On one hill a woman collapsed once she reached the top, luckily EMT's were attending to another biker near by and saw her too. The heat was even worse than before, and this race was getting surreal.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"><span style="font-size:16px;"><b>Afterburners</b></span></p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">I made it to RT 42 and when I hit mile 80 it was like someone flipped a switch and hit the afterburners. I was biking, I mean really biking. I was descending so fast I got wheel wobble and I carried enough momentum that I hardly had to pedal to crest those hills. This was the best part of the bike. It went like this: descend hard and fast, carry the speed up the hill, spin out the top and repeat endlessly for miles and miles, there is no better way to bike than like that, it was fun, it was fast, and for the first time all day I didn't care about the heat, or the hunger, or the bike problems, it was just pure fun.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">The good thing about this is I regained a huge amount of time. I passed around 50 people, which at this point in the race, meant I was really flying because there weren't that many people left on the course.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"><span style="font-size:16px;"><b>Descent into Madness</b></span></p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">At about mile 90 I dropped my chain again, this time I did an emergency adjustment of the front derailleur, it would be the big chain ring or nothing for the rest of the bike. Biking that way tends make one very conscientious of momentum. I was doing all I could to milk my strategy of build momentum and spin over the top. It was working quite nicely but then my old friend hunger came back. From then until the end all I could think about was food, and how much I wanted it. About a mile later I ran out of liquids. I had no food, no water, and only slightly less than 20 miles to go. At least it was down hill.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">I continued to see a vast scale of human carnage, bikes and bikers everywhere, too demoralized even to face the road...they starred off into the trees and tobacco fields like no one else was there. I was descending into madness myself.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">I was delirious with hunger, and loosing energy by the second. I was so thirsty but it didn't matter I couldn't get anything to drink until I got back to transition. All I could think about, and wish for was T2; it was all I wanted. By now I had just descended the last hill and was on 10 miles of flats to the end. By this time the flats didn't seem flat. All I could do to move forward was to pedal standing up, like a sprinter in the last 100yds of a bike race, only, I had 10 miles to go.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">Those 10 miles stretched on for eternity. It was all I could do to keep pedaling, one, then the other. At some point, I was passed by a guy on a BMX bike... I kept thinking just around the next bend I would see the city, and T2 would soon follow, but no, like a never ending nightmare the road stretched on and on it never ended. Finally, I saw a landmark I knew was only 2 miles from transition, but it took forever. It felt like it took a ½ an hour to go those two miles, or that those two miles were really 10 miles, who knows, I delirious, I could hardly keep the bike straight.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">Finally I turned to go into downtown and into the city. I was done. I was sure I was not going out on the run. I was positive. Or was I?</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"><span style="font-size:16px;"><b>To run or not to run, that is the question.</b></span></p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">As I dismounted, passed off my bike, and hobbled down the chute, I thought in the back of my mind... what if I can do it? What if I actually have just barely enough time to do the marathon? I grabbed my T2 bag and headed to the changing tent. I asked for 2 cokes, sat down and started to change. Instantly, that wondrous concoction of sugar and caffeine worked it's magic and I was ready to try for a run.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">Slowly, but surely I headed off down the road. I saw my girlfriend and sister again, and told them I would see what I could do and that maybe, just maybe, if I ate lots at aid stations I might have a chance to finish this thing. I headed up the bridge over the Ohio and back again. The aid stations were heavenly, they had everything I had been dreaming about, even the chicken broth. I did start to get my energy back, and I started a slow jog...Really slow. On any other day I could have walked faster, but that did not matter, I was trying.</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;"> </p>
<p style="margin-bottom:0in;">I got done with downtown portion of the run and headed south, soon though, I realized there was no way I was going to finish this thing. I could run only so long as I had sugar in my mouth or my stomach, as soon as that sugar was gone, I was only able to just barely walk. So I walked, and I walked and I walked. I made it to 8.2mile before I knew I wouldn't make the cutoff. I rounded the turn around found an official and called it a day. I had done all I could but the clock was against me and I saw no reason to keep walking only to be pulled from the course a few miles from the beginning of lap 2.</p>
 

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<p>Wow, what an epic day and RR.  The conditions sound absolutely brutal.  And your crank was coming off?!?  WTF??  Were you wearing a jersey that said, "Hey Murphy, come mess with me!"?  Man, we should have worked more mechanical preventatives into the virtual IM for you.  But who knew it was possible for any one person to have that much go wrong.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>We knew you've give it your all, and boy, did you!  I'm glad it was an iDNF and that you were able to get yourself off the course in one piece.  Finish line or not, you proved your mettle out there!</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Amazing job on a horrendous day.</p>
 

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<p>Smart move with pulling out. Holy shit that was indeed an epic day. I have to say though, as much as you may have wanted that finish line - just getting as far as you did, past so much human carnage - speaks volumes.</p>
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<p>Sounds like you built up a nutrition and hyrdration defecit EARLY on the bike and you were just screwed from then on out. Everything fed (yuk yuk) this negative feedback loop that was just impossible to escape.</p>
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<p>I'm glad you were still mentally able to do the math and realize the better part of valor. Your body had been through enough.</p>
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<p>And WTF is going on with your bike?!?!? Holy crap man. Did you just ride her into the GROUND this year? She totally gave up on you man. You need to get her to the shop or possibly put her out to pasture because it sounds like snapping clips was just the START of your problems, there is much more to it.</p>
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<p>thanks for the RR. We were rooting for ya, and with the sh!tty azz tracker we had no friggen clue. We are just glad you were ok!</p>
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<p>good job!</p>
<p><img alt="" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/hello2.gif" style="width:25px;height:27px;" title=""></p>
 

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<p>Holy crap, that is one heck of a story.  I heard about how tough it was there, but you put it into a whole new perspective.  Thus the reason that I don't know if I am ever going to do IMKY or IMMoo, too many hot and humid days that have been hellish for the athletes. </p>
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<p>Definitely smart pulling out when you did, you could have done some serious damage to your body had you continuted.  Based on all of the problems you encountered throughout the race I give you (pardon the street slang) "mad props" for soldiering on like you did.  There is always another race and I am sure you will kick ass on that one.  Serioulsly, that is an amazing effort that you put out on a treacherous day.</p>
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<p>Good job!</p>
<p> </p>
<p><a href="http://projectarizona.blogspot.com" target="_blank">Jamie</a></p>
<p> </p>
 

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<p>Dude.... I was tracking you all day.  It couldn't have been worse.  A teammate of mine who didn't make it said he saw someone pass out while they were riding!  Not sure what happened to that person.  Great job taking it on, I know you'll be back at it for another iron distance race.  Hope to see you in a few weeks.  Rest up!</p>
 

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<p>Geez, what brutal conditions.  Sorry the day didn't as planned, starting with getting off-coursed in swim to the mechanical issues, and the extreme weather.  Now rest well and good luck with the next endeavours!</p>
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
<p><br>
 </p>
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>TriAndStopMe</strong> <a href="/forum/thread/69823/rr-im-kentucky-2010#post_1940285"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>Wow, what an epic day and RR.  The conditions sound absolutely brutal.  And your crank was coming off?!?  WTF??  Were you wearing a jersey that said, "Hey Murphy, come mess with me!"?  Man, we should have worked more mechanical preventatives into the virtual IM for you.  But who knew it was possible for any one person to have that much go wrong.</p>
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<p><br>
I'm thinking that must be my slogan for tri's... Every time I do one my bike just get's a little bit worse.  This was the final straw though, if I did another tri on this bike I'd have to hook up a trailer full of parts and tools to take with me.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Ron:  You're right about the deficits.  I just could not believe how much hydration my body needed.  I think I would've had problems if even they had had aid stations 5 miles apart.  I just could not carry all the liquids my body needed for 10 miles at a time.  I was really disappointed with how little nutrition they provided out on the course.  About every other aid station had gels and that was it.  I couldn't believe they expected me to carry enough food for 112 in those conditions, or to eat enough 100Cal packets of gel to make up for it(I tried)!  Nope, it just was not my day.  Out on the  bike course the words "the old girl just ain't what she used to be"  Came to mind...I made a promise to myself out there: No Ironman's until I have a new bike, and then I made another promise to myself on the run:  I will not let Kentucky defeat me, so I'm coming back and soon!  Guess that means I get a new bike! <img alt="" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/icon_cheers.gif" title=""></p>
<p> </p>
<p>Miles:  It was a tough tough day, but I really did enjoy the bike course in those few moments when I had some speed.  It was worth the suffering.  I wouldn't count out those two races(especially IMoo, It could be 50F, you never know!).  I'd say that in spite of all that went wrong I was still pretty happy to be out there, on the bike, and enjoying the Ironman.  An Ironman is still an Ironman even if things don't go your way...It's still awesome to have the chance to try!</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Master of None:  Thanks for your support, I shall live to fight another day!</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Scott:  I wonder if we both saw the same person?  I saw someone do the exact same thing, one minute she was cycling then the next minute she was passed out on the ground.  It was crazy.  I can't wait to cheer everybody on at IMoo, hope you're resting up too, and I hope you have better weather than I did for Kentucky!  I think i've discovered the perfect recovery drink.  After the race we all went the old spagehti factory and milk came with the meal- three glasses later and I was feeling pretty good.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Don:  Thanks for the support, I left it all out on the course, at the end of the day that's all anybody can do.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Thor:  Thanks for the encouragement, it means a lot.  One of these days I'll finally get the Ironman I actually trained for!  That will be a day to remember. </p>
 

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<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>therambler</strong> <a href="/forum/thread/69823/rr-im-kentucky-2010#post_1940534"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border-bottom:0px solid;border-left:0px solid;border-top:0px solid;border-right:0px solid;"></a>
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<p>Scott:  I wonder if we both saw the same person? </p>
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<p><br><br>
You might have.  My teammate had splits very close to yours on swim and bike and wore a "Tri-umph" jersey (blue and black). </p>
 

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<p>Ouch!</p>
<p> </p>
<p>A tough day with mechanicals is tough no matter what, but you had to deal with multiple issues. As we all know, when your already tired, just counting to 10 seems like a huge ordeal. It sounds like no matter how hard you pushed, fate pushed back harder.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Next time.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>CS</p>
 

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<p>My God, man.  You are a STUD!!!  Congratulations on what will undoubtedly become a story you will tell when you're sitting around in a rocking chair at the old folks' home.  Amazing stuff.  Thanks for the race report!</p>
 

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<p>Wow....just can't think of another word to describe. My eyes were getting teary reading your report. Serious Murphy out there with you!!! I can't imagine having all those bike issues on top of just horrible conditions. But it sounds like you held on as hard as you could throughout the day - the sign of a tremendous athlete. Hope you're able to get some good rest this week and let your body heal. Thank you for sharing your day with us!!!!</p>
 

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<p>gah!</p>
<p>The heat is teh suck!</p>
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<p>Good job on making a good decision, though.</p>
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<p>I'd be interested in knowing whether people from the south handled the heat any better than the people from the north.</p>
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<p>I can remember training rides where I was as sweaty as you describe, but that was in the middle of training, and I carried a crap-ton of water with me and would refill if needed. </p>
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<p>I know that a friend of KCWoodhead's raced that day, so we should hear her impression, too. </p>
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<p>Glad you gutted it out as long as you did.....you definitely know the limits of your body now!</p>
 

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<p>Wow!  Way to gut it out...so many things to deal with in one race!  I'd bet there has to be a "perfect" race day in your cards 'cause you've earned it.  Thanks for sharing it all with us!</p>
 
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