Runners Forum - Kick Runners banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,430 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
<p>Black Fly "Int'l" Triathlon</p>
<p>.25mi S / 20.5mi B / 5mi R</p>
<p>Waterville Valley, NH</p>
<p> </p>
<p><strong>Pre-Race</strong></p>
<p>I went to bed around 10pm the night before and had crazy dreams about getting there late, the river and pond freezing over with ice and snow and generally losing my stuff or not being able to get to the race venue.  I think I have found the source of my pre-race anxieties.  They weren't as bad though as before Mooseman so I think it's probably 25% racing jitters and 75% getting to the venue anxiety.  I can work on that.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>It was Mooseman deja vu.  I was staying at my MIL's place at Lake Winnipesaukee, the forecast was for PM t-storms and I had to get up at 3:45am to head to a triathlon run by Endorfun Sports.  I didn't do packet pickup the night before because it made no sense to drive up there and back (3 hours round-trip) the night before so that added a little pressure but I tried to be as "whatever" as I could about it.  As for the weather, I declared to my in-laws that I <strong>meant</strong> it this time when I said any lightning and I am really going back to bed this time.  Luckily, there wasn't and the skies looked clear as they brightened.  After washing up, having breakfast (bagel & banana) and getting my stuff in the car I headed out around 4:45am.  Off to the north across the big lake I could see dark thickening clouds and off to the south clear skies.  Unfortunately, I was headed north.  It did indeed get cloudier and heavier as I went north and it looked like rain.  The air temp on the ride up was anywhere between 73F-76F so the dewpoints/humidity were very oppressive.  It was at least cool.  Once I got off the highway onto NH-49 headed into Waterville Valley there were some sprinkles bu the rain was still holding off.  On one of the turnouts near the river that flows along NH-49 I saw a huge bull moose standing watching the cars go by.  It was an incredible sight and believe it or not the first time I've seen a moose in NH.  I've seen plenty in ME but none in NH.  I knew when I told the kids they be thrilled.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I'd never been to Waterville Valley but I'd always wanted to check it out.  I really didn't know where I was going so I followed the cars in front of me.  Unfortunately they were lost but after they pulled over I got lucky enough to see further down the road the signs for parking.  Parking was super easy right on the other side of the building from transition, etc.  As I was getting my stuff out of my car I saw ksurp walking across the parking lot headed for packet pickup.  One person in the parking lot and it's someone I knew!  She kindly let me tag along to where everything was so I didn't have to wander around.  She even let me in on the secret of the hidden bathroom!  Pickup was super easy and quick and I was immediately relaxed.  It was good to get there nice and early and get that out of the way.  I also ran into some friends from my area who I'd forgotten were racing so I ended up knowing a few people and was lucky enough to bump into everyone.  Fun! </p>
<p> </p>
<p>It was hard just walking around or organizing transition and not notice the humidity.  Every movement brought on pouring sweat.  That was until it started to pour rain.  I was lucky enough to have a couple of plastic bags in my transition bag but luckier still that ksurp had a extra one and that I'd gotten everything under cover before the skies opened up.  No thunder though.  Everyone would jump though when someone took a flash picture or started up a motorcycle.  No way around it: it was going to be a wet day.  Soon enough it was time to leave transition for the pre-race meeting and national anthems.  Then it was time to line up for the swim by number in time trial fashion.</p>
<p> </p>
<p><strong>Swim (9:45, 2:13/100yd)</strong></p>
<p>The swim start was nothing like I'd experienced before.  The swim is in a tiny little "pond" so there's no real practical way to do wave starts.  The start is very much like a time-trial, lined up by number and sent off every 5 seconds.  The rain made the slope down to the coffee-colored water slippery but I managed to get into the water without slipping.  Some kind folks in line had warned about large rocks at the start and to not dive in so I had to take a few steps and then get going.  The swim was going to be a pretty quick one -- only 1/4mi counter-clockwise around the "pond".  It was nowhere near as crowded as I thought and there was no colliding at all.  You could feel where the springs come into the pond when it'd go from bathwater to chilly.  Despite the short distance I did find it harder than expected but managed to get into a good rhythm with my stroke.  What made it feel hard was more the heavy feeling in the lungs I think from the humidity.  I tried to concentrate on good form but I always find it hard to keep my head down enough in races to not drag my feet because I want to see who/what is in front of me in the water.  It was over pretty quick though slower than I thought.  I figured to be closer to 9:00 from past experience.</p>
<p> </p>
<p><strong>T1 (3:58)</strong></p>
<p>T1 was a pretty log run from the swim exit and my bike was racked along at the opposite end.  I felt great though and was able to run all the way to my bike after thanking the wetsuit strippers.  Wetsuit strippers are awesome.  Everything was soaked and I had to change plans mid-game here.  I also found my bike laying on the ground on top of the guy next to me's stuff.  Wouldn't you pick someone's bike back up if you knocked it over?  I decided to go without socks (I'd never get them on) and just douse myself with tons of powder.  Things took extra long getting them out of plastic bags but it was worth it even if everything was soaked within seconds of getting it on.  There was no drying the feet - just powder, powder and more powder.  The run out to the mount line was uneventful though it did feature some jumping around and over mudpuddles.</p>
<p> </p>
<p><strong>Bike (1:10:50, 17.4mph)</strong></p>
<p>By this time the rain was just coming down in buckets.  It was hard to see and it made me a bit nervous because riding in the rain is only something I've done by accident.  I seemed to have really good tire grip though and it didn't feel slippery (though oftentimes later this good grip would feel like it was slowing things down).  I told myself that I've been biking since I was a kid and this is my favorite thing.  I am just going to be confident that a lifetime of riding is going to carry me through and that I need to just relax and let it all hang loose. It worked and I had no fear. I didn't wipe out -- I didn't end up in the river.  The bike course is basically 10mi down hill and 10mi back uphill.  There were times where I was flying along at 30mph just peeking above my sunglasses, down in the drops as far as I could letting gravity do the work as the rain hit with a sting like needles.  I was having ALOT of fun.  I even had fun when we made the abrupt transition from all downhill to a hard right into a steep but short hill.  I was happy to get up out of the saddle and I just attacked the hill though it was steep enough I worried about slipping backwards.  I dusted a whole bunch of people on this hill that just weren't ready for it.  Shift early and often and get up on your feet.  There was a lot more downhill even after that and here I made sure to take in some water and gatorade.  Then it was time to climb back up to Waterville Valley.  This was fine for the first 6mi or so but I was definitely read to be done with about 4mi to go.  You just had to keep spinning and wait for the tenths of a mile to click by.  I am sure the scenery was great but I couldn't see any of it.  Here and there I'd put it into a harder gear just to stand up and get into a different position.  I got slower and slower but stuck to my plan to go a bit easier on the bike and not all out like I usually do in order to see if I'd have a better run.  Before I knew it there was transition.  I was happy to get off the bike.  I think I did something like 21.5mph all the way out and 13.5mph all the way back.</p>
<p> </p>
<p><strong>T2 (2:51)</strong></p>
<p>In T2 I took the time to put on socks.  I wanted to avoid any blisters and they were dry from being inside the bag along with my shoes.  Again the baby powder came in handy.  I put as much as I could on my feet and again in my socks and off I went.  I was very happy with how good my legs felt and that I wasn't experiencing any cramping in my quads like I had at Lobsterman last year and during an earlier long brick.  Going a tiny bit easier on the bike (backing off about .5mph overall) had paid off.  I guess the key is to find that point of diminishing returns and then have the discipline to stay just under that line.  That was the plan and I executed.</p>
<p> </p>
<p><strong>Run (50:40, 10:08/mi)</strong></p>
<p>My big goal for the day was to have a good run.  I wanted to be right around 10:00/mi, feel good and keep the walking to only planned.  I didn't want the 11:00+/mi disaster run I'd had at Lobsterman.  The first 2mi I definitely felt heavy legs and lungs but I knew from experience that I could push through, feel better and start increasing my pace.  I just had to be patient.  I had to remind myself to run <strong>my</strong> race.  Part of that discipline was walking at the aid stations.  There would be one at 1mi, 2.5mi and 4mi.  My plan was to grab a water, drink, count 10 deep breaths and then increase the pace.  I executed this according to plan with the exception of 2 short steep hills I power walked.  I noticed when power walking nobody running was making a whole lot more progress than I was but at the top I was able to pass some of these people when I started running again.  The plan was working.  Coming into the mile 4 aid station I also passed a couple of people so while people were fading I was still going strong.  Right before I took the water/walk break at mile 4 I passed someone who then leapfrogged me and then I in turn leapfrogged when I start running.  On that last pass, I heard the footsteps get heavier.  They wanted to make it a race.  I decided then my goal was to hold them off until the finish and I just kept increasing the pace, testing the waters, increasing the pace.  Those footsteps were right behind me but fading until about 1 minute to go when I decided to go for it.  In doing that, I passed a couple of more people who'd passed me earlier.  I charged the finish line strong.  I was so happy to be finished and to have had such a strong run, passing people at the end and holding off that heavy-footed runner that tried to catch me.  Better yet, I'd finished my 2nd longest ever triathlon and the first of 2010!  That's a PR then, right? ;)</p>
<p> </p>
<p><strong>Post Race</strong></p>
<p>I had a lot of dumb luck that day running into people I knew.  Right after the finish I found ksurp again.  She was very happy with her race and results.  I got to meet one of her friends that's part of her bike group.  In turn, I introduced her to those aforementioned friends one of whom was kind enough to take our picture.  I got some food in the food tent and walked back with the guys to transition.  Ksurp was there too.  We chatted as we broke down transition and all walked out together.  The rain let up and it was a nice ride back to the big lake.  I decided it'd be nice to call DW and let her know I'd finished and that I was on my way home.  Problem was my bike bag was filled with water with my now dead cellphone in the bottom!  Oh well.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Post-race libations available at the race site were Coors Light so I waited until I got back to the cottage to indulge in some Sierra Nevada Pale Ale.</p>
<p> </p>
<p><strong>Results</strong></p>
<p><strong>2:18:02, 14/17 Clydes, 344/404 OA</strong></p>
<p>So, yeah, standings-wise it wasn't the best result but as far as how I felt and how I ran my race as my race, it was a very, very good and strong result.  I had a really good time and applied a lot I'd learned from Lobsterman last year.  I had a much better paced race than Lobsterman (of course, it helps that this race is a bit shorter) and so accomplished what I wanted to on the run.  That was always the issue last year.  I'd leave it all out on the bike course and go home with bike PRs and among the worst run results.  I wanted to back off just a hair - only 1/2mph or so from goal - and see how that made thing go and it really came around.  It was great to have a solid effort even if it was BOP relatively speaking.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I got to see a moose, I got to see friends and I got to race in the rain which was a new experience.  I had a great day.  I think next year I'd like to do it again and maybe give the Friday night TT a shot.  It sounds like fun.  Hopefully it will stay small and can be the laid back event to look forward to out of the spotlight of big races like Timberman.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>BTW, I discovered last night my seat was close to falling off.  I bet something happened when my bike fell over.  I haven't looked close enough to see what's loose.  So, I did that whole ride on a loose seat.  I am lucky.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Thanks for reading!</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
<p>Doug</p>
<p>Great RR reading.  I love reading RR from a race I was in because it lends an entirely different perspective, and let's me relive the race through different eyes.  The race was tough.  The bike course is like nothing else.  750 feet of climbing in 10 mile s (in the rain) is work.  You have a great attitude and you should be proud of your effort.</p>
<p>You should absolutely consider the Lord of the Flies for next year.  I think racing 3 days is an experience you will remember for a long time.  You build a sense of camraderie with those racked around you.</p>
<p>By the way, at the Diamond Edge North lounge, they had Sam Adams, Smuttynose... (real beer -sorry to offend Coors Light lovers) in exchange for the Beer Bucks.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,385 Posts
<p>Great report and race, Doug! Seems to me that you gained quite a bit of confidence since competing at Lobsterman last year. I think that's going to go a long way for you and should absolutely allow you to continue turning out results like this! Congratulations!<span style="display:none;"> </span></p>
<p> </p>
<p> Very cool that you were able to run into so many people there and see a moose on the way up. Glad you had such a good experience (minus the jerk that knocked over your bike), though we did miss you in Amesbury!</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,936 Posts
<p>It was fun hanging out with you on Saturday. Nice job out there with your 2nd longest tri ever - especially on the bike! Sorry to read that some jerk knocked your bike over and didn't pick it - up. See you at Timberman!<br>
 </p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,368 Posts
<p>Very good to hear that you were very happy about how the race went!!!!  Congrats particularly on the solid run!  I can feel in your RR that this kind of race can keep you going after a new goal & a new challenge.  Keep up the gerat work, Dougie! </p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,430 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
<p>Thanks for reading and the comments, everyone.  I had a lot of fun in this race and I was really able to manage it well.  I think when you go into a new race sight unseen you don't know what's around the corner so it's hard to know how to race the course.  That's where having a plan and sticking with it came in handy and for me it made the race a lot more fun. </p>
<p> </p>
<p>But, for me even more fun is the races (like for me: Timberman) where you know every inch of the course and know when and where to hammer but still have enough in the tank.  I guess it just all comes with experience.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Fun too is now I see people at these races that I know.  I can't wait for Timberman with all the in-laws and now this year a bunch of my neighbors have been inspired and they will be there too doing their first or second ever triathlons.  It's going to be a blast even if that very day of the Timberman sprint is when I turn 40.  I hope I don't start losing pieces on the course ;).</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,312 Posts
<p>Yikes about that saddle, Doug!</p>
<p> </p>
<p>WTG on a solid race and on sticking to your plan!!!</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,914 Posts
<p>Dougie, Dougie, Dougie... Way to nail this Oly. That is no easy feat, and I know you worked hard at it, so a huge congratulations for taking what was yours... and being smart during the race to stay with *your* race, as you put it (ie "my" race). And you're right, it's hard but not impossible to find that happy level on the bike so that you can still run but also not give up any time. And you ran, and you ran well, so good for you for figuring it out. Because it is the same sort of thing as the distances get longer. Oly is a tough race to get right, and it seems you have done it. Also, exceptionally well written report. Not only was it easy to read, it was also fun because I know you earned all that you got on that day. Good on you, mate!</p>
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,199 Posts
<p>Great race!  Sounds like you nailed it and stuck with your plan throughout the race!  Now if I can only take what you displayed here and discipline myself to do the same!</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Congratulations!</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
228 Posts
<p>Awesomely executed race on what sounds like a tough course-- Congrats!!  And a good call on the Sierra Nevada Pale Ale <img alt="" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/hello2.gif" style="width:25px;height:27px;" title=""></p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,430 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
<p>Thanks again, everyone.  I am still basking in the afterglow of this fun race.  I must have done something right because where I ended up in the standings (BOP) would usually bother me.  I think I am happy that I was consistent, enjoyed the race and didn't let the rainy conditions or anything else change that I wanted to race my race. The run was the hardest place to remember that as people are blowing by me it's easy to get down a bit but I reminded myself to run my race.  I think I've come to some kind of peace with that this year.  Maybe with that peace and confidence now I can start becoming the endurance athlete I want to be,</p>
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top