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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I am trying to get my butt off the spin bike at the gym and get back on my own bike. After getting new pedals and needing to replace the cleats on my shoes, plus getting a new cogg and a new chain it has taken way too long to get everything together.<br><br>
Now all I have left is replacing my chain. I am feeling clueless. After reading Zinn & The Art of Road Bike Maintenance am I right in thinking I need a special tool just to put a new chain on? I thought it would be easier than that.<br><br>
Also, another stupid question. Do I need to grease my new cogg? And is it easier to lube my new chain once it's on or before I put it on?<br><br>
Thanks for all you help!!!
 

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I dunno...my bike shop is exactly one mile down the road. They're supa nice to me...I wish I could help...I'm sure JR will be in soon!
 

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Yes, you do need a special tool. I like the Park tool, there are others that are well made, don't buy a tiny one. Read the directions carefully and go to the park tool website and read theirs too. Use the old chain as your guide. First draw the line the chain takes through the cogs so you can figure it out later. Use the tool to press any link all the way out of the old chain. Take your time and don't use excessive force or you will bend the pin in the tool. Now, remove the chain and use it as a guide to remove some links from the new one so its the same length. Now, with a shimano chain, you will put the chain back on the bike, making sure it's on there correctly and drive in the special black pin and snap it off with pliers, then use your tool per instructions to loosen the inevitable still link. It's pretty quick to do.<br><br>
You clean your cogs off with a rag, clean the new chain with degreaser and oil.<br><br>
It helps to have someone walk you through it the first time, there's a couple little tricks I like to use.<br><br>
Alternatly, you can buy an Sram chain and use the superlink that comes with it, you still need the tool to shorten the chain though.
 

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I like the SRAM chains best, with their Powerlink, because you can easily remove the chain again for cleaning. Get a chain to match your cogs (8, 9, or 10 spd etc).<br><br>
Don't lube the cogs, just the chain. If the chain is off the bike you can lay it on newspaper, squirt some lube on, rub it in and wipe the excess off and install. Or if the chain is on the bike, I put a rag under where I squirt some lube on the chain as I spin a pedal backwards. Too much is not good; just picks up dirt. I usually use lube for dry conditions like Pedros icewax, since it pick up dirt less, unless I know it's going to rain then I use somethign like Pedros synlube.<br><br>
Carrying a chaintool withyou on every ride is a good idea. I've never broken a chain yet but have busted deraillereurs and had to shorten chain to make a singlespeed.<br><br>
Good luck!
 

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If you have a multi tool in your bike bag, you probably already have a chain tool. Some/most of the multi tools have it.<br><br>
CS
 

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How often should you replace the chain? 1000 miles? 1500?<br>
I'm over that now on the odometer. Do I need to head to the bike shop?
 

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It depends on how you take care of it--measure it with a steel rule from pin to pin, it should be 12 inches, if over 1/8 out of spec it's shot. Shops have chain checkers, I have a Rohloff that works nice, the Park one is a little suspect. Don't delay on replacement or your cogs will need to be replaced also = $.
 

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Ok, thanks. I'll check it out tomorrow.<br>
If it depends on how I take care of it, then um... it probally needs to be replaced.
 

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The local LBS guy told me if you don't replace your chain soon enough you ruin your coggies.
 

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Kyle--wash your bike with soap and water in a bucket, use one brush for the whole bike, then use a different one (it will get filthy) to wash the chain. If the chain is awful, degrease with simple green or engine degreaser and rinse with hot water. Blow the moisture out with some WD40 or an air compressor and put some motor oil on the chain and wipe off. I leave all the supplies right in the bucket, takes 5 minutes and you have a clean enough bike and your chain lasts much longer.<br><br>
If you are in a rush, blow it clean with wd40 and a rag, wipe and oil--go ride.
 

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Cool thanks. I do clean it. Just not as often as I should. I usually use WD40, an old toothbrush and towel.<br>
Motor oil huh? Thats a good idea too.
 

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You can use chain saw bar oil too, but it's kind of stiff for this time of year. I sometimes just use straight WD40 (I get the gallon cans at the tractor store) this time of year on my winter bike, the chain is junk by March anyway with all the salt and sand and crap on the roads. I have had OK luck with the Sram chains with the quick links, you can toss the chain in solvent and swish it around. I've had a couple of the links break, though.
 

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We don't have the "salt and sand and crap on the roads" problem down here in Louisiana. It got to 22 this past Thursday morning and that's COLD for us.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Kyle;<br><br>
Take it from someone who has learned her lesson!! I had to replace my cogg because I didn't replace my chain. I took NILL care of my bike. I am trying to get better at it. I did alll this damage to my cogg and chain after riding for only 9 months. The wet weather here in Seattle doesn't help much!
 

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I'm listening <img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif"><br>
I definately don't want to get into cog replacement. I'd rather take care of the chain. I'm gonna measure it tomorrow as per JRodens recommendations. If it needs replaceing, it'll get done this week. In fact, I think I'll just go ahead and replace it anyway. Start the new season with a new chain.
 

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What kind of chain do you have? If you are using a Campy 10-spd, then I think you might need a very expensive Campy tool. Otherwise, you will have more tool choices. The other option, if you are using Campy, is to go with SRAM or Wipperman chain designed for Campy 10 Spd. I've had better luck with the Wipperman than the SRAM on a Campy 10 Spd.<br><br>
Victor
 

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Just use a standard pump oil can or a ketchup dispenser, pedal the bike backwards and drip a steady bead of oil onto the chain, then gently pedal it backwards for a minute, then run it through a rag and wipe off all the oil you can, you want the oil inside the chain, not all over the outside attracting dirt.<br><br>
Always clean the chain before you oil, adding oil onto a dirty chain just creates an abrasive slurry that destrys it faster.
 

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Gosh I'm glad you explained that. I was thinking along the lines of car oil. You know, those 1 quart cans. I couldn't fiugre out how I was going to get it out of the can and onto the chain. <img alt="roll_eyes.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/roll_eyes.gif">
 
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