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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've started doing recovery runs again. Basically I do my longish run on Sunday and get back on the road again on Monday for some slow recovery miles. I've basically decided to do a combined 20 miles btwn the two days. (I am currently training for halfs and starting marathon training from my half base at the end of October) I will probably bump the combined mileage up to 26 as my long runs get longer.<br><br>
Hal higdon in his book suggests that rest is good after the long run and a recovery run is ok if you just have to run.<br><br>
Pfitzinger /Douglas in their book incorporate Recovery runs as part of the routine.<br><br>
They say that "recovery runs are short runs done at a relaxed pace to enhance recovery for your next hard work out".<br><br>
In the past I've used both programs. My experience says that these recovery runs are a good idea.<br><br>
What does your experience say.
 

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I think there is a wide range of opinion on this, it depends on how your legs respond.<br><br>
I'm going to be at the extreme end of the "don't run" opinion. That is what works for me, but you may respond differently. I avoid running as a way to recover, but I always do some form of crosstraining to get the legs moving.<br><br>
I would also suggest that the most common mistake is that people run recovery runs too hard, or make them too long. Recovery runs should be really easy, or they're not recovery runs.<br><br>
The other thing I see you saying (maybe I misunderstand) is that you're going to add combined mileage of two days to count as your long run mileage. If you really mean that, things don't work that way. The training effects of a long run do not carry over to a recovery run.<br><br>
Doing double long runs like in ultra training is an exception: but that's more like two long runs on consecutive days with a rest or recovery run the day after the two long runs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I actually meant to say that the combined mileage will hit that mark mostly as a way to figure out how far to run the recovery's I run mine very slowly usually a minute or so slower than my long run pace. I run my longs at about 45 secs slower than my goal pace and my mid weeks at Marathon goal pace.<br><br>
Recovery runs seem to freshen my legs.
 

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I am doing them as part of my plan to run Tokyo in Feb. I am following the Pfitz 24/55, which has a day off after the long run, but I am running anyway. I try to keep it short and sweet...maybe only 3 miles or so, which is 35 min. If I feel good I might go up to 5 miles. My guideline for length is to run until I feel like running...and then stop.
 

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From the perspective of this 6x/week runner, a short and slow run does more to speed recovery than does a day off.<br><br>
I find that on the next day (after the recovery run) that I am ready for the next quality workout. I find that when I take a day off after a long run, that I am not as fresh when I come back for the next day's run.<br><br>
I don't know the exact physiology. Perhaps the reason is that blood flow caused by the recovery run helps flush accumulated toxins from the involved leg muscles, allowing for the faster recovery. Using this theory, a spinning or similar cross-training session could provide the same recovery stimulus.
 

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Also, my recovery run pace is about 30-45 seconds slower than Easy pace, or about 1:30-2:00 slower than goal marathon pace. I really don't stress about pace on these runs.
 

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Yep, that's why.<br><br>
I also feel the benefits of recovery workouts, although mine are usually spinning class the day after speedwork. It's a great recovery workout and really loosens up and revives the legs.<br><br>
Maybe this is mostly psychological, but on the day after a long run I purposely take the first 3-4 miles extremely easy and by then feel ready to go again, and often have very strong finishes.
 

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why would I need to recover from a long slow run?<br><br>
I do my recovery runs after speed, intervals, tempo, or if the long run had alot of miles at MP. I consider a 2.5 hour LSD run an easy day.
 

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I just complete the Pfitz 18/55 prior to running MCM. I think the recovery runs are very necessary and helpful. BTW, I swapped the LR to Saturday and put the miles in the plan that are the day before the long run on Sunday and ran them as recovery. Worked for me. 19 min PR...3:29:53
 

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recovery runs get a thumbs up from me. i try to run every day. my goal on a recovery run is to feel better after i run than before i started the run. and i'm willing to go to great lengths to achieve that goal, even mp+2:30 per mile. when it's hot, even slower... i just slap on the mp3 player, swallow my pride, and get it done. yeah, i'm ruthless<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.kickrunners.com/forum/images/smilies/cool.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Cool"><br><br>
ideal training week (last fall) was:<br>
m: recovery<br>
t: track intervals<br>
w: recovery<br>
t: tempo - road or track<br>
f: recovery<br>
s: road intervals<br>
s: long run
 
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