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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
<p>The Tuesday thread had a bunch of questions about fueling for/during long runs. Here what has worked for me.</p>
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<p>Eat a very large meal 36 hours before race time. Then don't eat anything for 18 hours. It is ok to take fluids. Then eat modest sized high carb meals, you will carry these meals with you during the race so you don't want them so big they make you feel bloated or slow you down. When you wake up long run (or race) day the first thing that should happen is that you will have a bowel movement so intense it will be like a religious experience and be good to go (run without intestinal interruption) all day.</p>
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<p>24 hours before race time do the Western Australia carbo loading sequence. My modified method is to go to the track, stretch, then jog 600 meters and then sprint all out 1000 meters. The theory is that 3 minutes of intense effort will deplete the glycogen in your muscles and cause a sponging effect which will double your glycogen (with proper carbo intake) in 24 hours. You want your muscles screaming from the effort, a run long enough to deplete your muscle glycogen, but not long enough to affect your run tomorrow morning. I go 1000 meters because it takes almost 4 minutes and I want to be really depleted.</p>
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<p>During your long run (or race) your body can get about 30% of its calorie need from carbs in the digestion track rather than from the onboard glycogen stores in the liver. So you can extend your window of powered effort (as opposed to bonking) by taking in proper fuel during your run. At 10 minutes per mile you are burning between 600 calories (for a 120 lber) to 1000 calories (for 220lbers like me) per hour, so taking in 200 to 300 calories (depending on your size) per hour keeps you from running down too quickly. Don't try to take it all at once, break it into thirds and take that amount every 20 minutes (even if you don't feel like you need it now, you will need it later).</p>
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<p>Don't stick to just one thing, you can build up an intolerance to it. I used gu exclusively, until I got a gag reflex from it and can't take it at all now. Gels are fine, but also try honey, licorice, oreo cookies, other candies, sports drinks and other sources of high carb calories.</p>
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<p>During the run don't wait until you feel the need for more energy, whatever you eat will take about 20 minutes before the energy becomes available. If you wait until you feel you need it, it is too late. You should have taken the food 20 minutes earlier.</p>
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<p>For runs of 10 miles or less you should be able to finish it without needing any refueling, though you may feel better if you do take something. A couple mouthfuls of sport drink should be more than enough.</p>
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<hr class="bbcode_rule"><p> </p>
<p>EXAMPLE: 20 mile run saturday morning at 9am</p>
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<p>6pm Thursday: eat very large meal, doesn't have to be high carb. Get a good night's sleep.</p>
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<p>8am Friday: do carbo depletion sequence, refuel with a quart of gatorade.</p>
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<p>noon Friday: eat an average sized high carb meal. Snacks ok.</p>
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<p>6pm Friday: eat an average sized high carb meal. Snacks ok. Get a good night's sleep.</p>
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<p>6am Saturday: bowel movement, eat an average sized high carb meal (not necessarily in that order)</p>
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<p>8:45am Saturday: stretch, warm up, take your first energy source (gel, gatorade, licorice, whatever)</p>
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<p>9:00am Saturday: run smart, eat a mouthful of something every 20 - 30 minutes, water as needed </p>
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<hr class="bbcode_rule"><p> </p>
<p>Try this on a practice run before doing it for race day. Tweak as needed.</p>
 

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<p>sounds like you've got a regular pattern that works plugging!</p>
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<p>during my marathon build-up, i'll often run a 20+ miler the day after a hard interval session.  it's good training, and i think it builds some mental toughness.  something to think about long-term, but definitely not something to try a few weeks before a race... it took about a year before i could feel comfortable doing two hard workouts back-to-back on weekend days.</p>
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<p>the main new thing i've done is to make sure i eat within an hour of finishing a workout.  it has turned into a pattern now, and i think it really helps my body get ready for the next run.  i avoid caffeine, and take it easy with alcohol, so that i stay hydrated fairly well all the time.</p>
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<p>pre-race, i eat a good sized lunch but a smallish dinner.  small bowl of oatmeal 2+ hours before the gun, and i try to get 200 cals of gu in me per hour (usually one packet every 4-5 miles).</p>
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
<p>Here is a link to some recent info on carbo depletion/loading techniques</p>
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<p><a href="http://www.active.com/nutrition/Articles/The_evolving_art_of_carbo-loading.htm" target="_blank">http://www.active.com/nutrition/Articles/The_evolving_art_of_carbo-loading.htm</a></p>
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<p>(I know, I know, it's active.com)</p>
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<p>The take away for me is find a routine that works and stick with it.</p>
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<p>And it's <em>bowel</em>, b-o-w-<strong>e</strong>-l.   In case anyone got confused.  <img alt="" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/rolleyes.gif" title=""></p>
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<p>Thanks, PA.</p>
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>mcsolar99</strong><a href="/forum/thread/70242/preparing-for-a-long-run#post_1947652"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border-bottom:0px solid;border-left:0px solid;border-top:0px solid;border-right:0px solid;"></a>
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<p>the main new thing i've done is to make sure i eat within an hour of finishing a workout.</p>
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<p><br><br>
You might want to refuel within 30 minutes of finishing a workout. (forgot the links, these are just a couple from google. lots of sources say refuel within 30minutes)</p>
<p><a href="http://www.mamashealth.com/run/runfuel.asp" target="_blank">http://www.mamashealth.com/run/runfuel.asp</a></p>
<p><a href="http://www.powerbar.com/articles/356/understanding-muscle-fueling.aspx" target="_blank">http://www.powerbar.com/articles/356/understanding-muscle-fueling.aspx</a></p>
 
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