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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm wondering if anyone can help me out with this phase of training. I'm finding that I want to go out there and do more than I think I should, or the complete opposite and do nothing.<br><br>
Do you plan your prep phase training like you do other phases? Is it rigid or fluid? How do you keep yourself from burning out and doing too much too soon?<br><br>
Tammy
 

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What's the point of the cycle? At some point you should be building up your strength so your body will adapt and allow you to open up the turbo a little more with some speedwork without getting injured. It might make sense to add some hills to your runs, some strength work on the bike (low rpm stuff) and some basic speed with 100m striders after shorter runs--is that the sort of focus you have right now? If you can move off being a "one speed" sort of athlete with some strength work, that's a good thing. As a warning, you will be pokey and sluggish during strength building and tempo.
 

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Whatever you do, just make it consistent. What I mean by that is if you have motivation issues, then find yourself a routine and stick to it. If it's Monday morning and you usually run Monday mornings, then regardless of the phase of training you're in, get out there and run. If you're in prep phase training -- not even sure what you mean by that -- then get out and at least go easy. When you're in full swing that Monday morning workout might be something very different with much more quality.<br><br>
Consistency is the surest way toward endurance fitness, including speed.
 

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JR & Thor both have good points. I think the point of this cycle is to prepare your body for the heavier loads that are coming so consistency is key. This is the time to do a lot of strength training, swim form and a lot of Z1/Z2 work on the run & bike.<br><br>
I admit, I am a resistance-avoiding triathlete so DAISNAID (do as I say.... <img alt="wink.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/wink.gif"> ).
 

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In addition to JR'S and Thor's comments I would add a specific answer to your question: Fluid or rigid? If you go with Thor's style then it is fluid, but if you go with JR's, it needs to be more rigid, to help mitigate the chance of injury.<br><br>
In other words, if you actually set down a plan, with really specific, quantifiable objectives (push 700 watts (!) for 30 minutes on the trainer), then you really need to follow a plan, and stick to it. But if you view the prep phase as merely a chance to ease back into training, go with how you feel and not worry too much about it.<br><br>
Reading JR's post again, I think that is a real good view. One can view the sole purpose of base training on the run is to be able to do speedwork without getting injured. A nice benefit is you get in good shape along the way. Similarly for strength training on the bike, it is for getting ready to push a big gear for the duration of your race. You need strength to do that.<br><br>
If you want some more specific answers, we need a little more about what you are training for, and when it (they) is (are).<br><br>
Since this prep phase is the first thing you are easing into at the start of what is likely a long season, the last thing you want to do is make it drudgery. Like Thor said, be consistent, do some training.<br><br>
-Jim
 

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I'm pretty sloppy about my training, but during the winter I do a lot of testing. I find the simple fact that I can see a real improvement in what I do over time to be very motivating. Because I use bike racing in the early spring as part of my build up, I have a gun held to my head in that it will be hellish going out racing with a bunch of young punks without some fitness in the bag, simply godawful.
 

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Precisely why knowing the full picture is so critical.<br><br>
I bet there a few young punks holding a 40 y/o gun to their head for prideful reasons.
 

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I wish I was 40, I was still getting faster then... I do have people who seek me out from time to time to explain how happy they were to beat me in a race, the feeling is never very mutual. I can think of a half dozen kids I've seen grow up and move onto pro level cycling (which in the US means sleeping in the back of your car more often than ameteurs) it's neat to see them on the way up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
You guys all make a lot of sense.<br><br>
My first A race is an Oly in July. My second A race is a HIM in September. I've been reviewing the previous years races and know that my limiters are OW swimming and running speed. I don't want to lose the gains I achieved this past year on my bike and still wish to work on hill strength.<br><br>
I don't want this period to be drudgery and yet I do very well with a set schedule.
 

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I think adding the basic speed of 6-8 x 100 meters at the end of your medium and short runs will help you stay snappy and motivated. There is no law against your jumping in some 5K's or open track meets this time of year either. Have you ever sought out cross country races for the fall in your area? They are a real different way to end the year and develop some strength as a runner.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Jr- actually we do have a trail running series that is about ready to kickoff. I'll check into that. It'll get me doing something different and in some great country. Cool beans!
 

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Also check out real cross country races, they are usually 5K for women, they are usually on easier courses than trail runs. Also, cyclocross is a great fall sport that keeps you riding the bike even after the season ends, I enjoy it a lot.
 

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I'd second the trail running or cross-country running idea - it gives you some work on some muscles you don't normally work during a typical road race, yet in the end it's less pounding than a similar distance on pavement
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks Joe and JR. It's really hard to be motivated this time of the year- when the next race isn't until April, and the days are dark and rainy.
 
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