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I thought you all might be interested in this article that was in the New York Times.<br><br><a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/03/health/nutrition/03Best.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1&nl=8hlth&emc=hltha4" target="_blank">http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/03/he...lth&emc=hltha4</a><br><br>
Susan
 

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Riley,<br>
I just read that and thought about posting it. Amongst our running peers we find out who the best "sports" docs are in town. We don't have a large group to pick from but we have a choice of a good few. One is an extremely handsome tri guy. My DW has recommended him to her frens! Actually he forced me out of a marathon last summer and it was the best thing ever for me. Forced time out!
 

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Thanks, Susan.<br><br>
After hearing so many times that running destroys joints and that I should do something else, it was so refreshing to find a doctor who "gets it" and wants to help me keep doing what I love.<br><br>
I bet you all have some interesting anti-running doctor stories, huh?
 

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I fired mine. New doc is a neat woman who shares clinic space with one of the sports med groups in town. I'm very happy. When we met, I told her I'd be coming to her "broken" more often than "sick." She looked pleased. <img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif">
 

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Thanks for sharing this article, Susan. Now all I need to find is a yoga teacher trained in therapeutics who caterers to runners. Or maybe I should just become one.... <img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif">
 

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dtoce - <img alt="biggrin.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/biggrin.gif">
 

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My favorite part:<br><br>
They tend, in fact, to be like one of my running partners, who told me that when it comes to a diagnosis, she regards doctors mainly as a source for a second opinion. The first opinion is her own, she said.<br><br>
dtoce, will you write me a permission slip for me to my Dad (who's a heart doc, too) to keep running? I know I've been doing it 25 years and I'm in my 40s but.... I heard it again while visiting over Christmas -- I'm going to get arthritis in my knees.
 

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Soundie, I can commit you to a mental institution (so you can join we who insist on challenging our knees and other joints)
 

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This was a very interesting article, Susan. It goes along with Dr. Noakes' rule "never accept as final the word of someone who doesn't support your running, even if it's a doctor".<br><br>
I have a chiropractor, who I actually like very much, but he's really down on running. He just believes it's bad for the body. He's a good chiropractor and I've seen big improvements in myself since I started being treated by him. But I have learned to tell him very little about my running. I play it down, since I don't want a(nother) lecture.<br><br>
When an athlete is hurt, the easy answer is always to stop activity. Sometimes that's appropriate, but it takes some discerning and a good, supportive doctor, to know if total rest is really what's required.
 

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there will always be people who believe in certain things...and a note will not change their mind.<br><br>
Buy him one of Dr Sheehan's books (maybe Dr Sheehan on Running?).<br>
He talks about the cumulative risk of running throughout the years and the beating the body takes but all of the risk is offset by the benefit of activity/longevity and health. I do believe that soft surfaces as often as possible will limit DJD in the knees due to running and that there is an association of increased arthritis, but do not believe that one should stop, just adjust/modify behavior.<br><br>
He also alludes to the fact that the medical profession was very slow to respond to runners concerns and how the common answer 'well, don't do that (insert activity here) if it hurts to do that' really isn't appropriate for runner/athletes.
 

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My orthopedic doc is a runner... he runs a lot... and skies, etc. His goal is always to get me back on the road again as soon as possible 'cuz he knows I won't listen to "stop running" for long. And he's awful easy on the eyes...! <img alt="biggrin.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/biggrin.gif">
 

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Erika, my doc must be your doc's clone. I've only had one disagreement with him. Last time I went in for an injury he suggested that some people are built to run marathons and some aren't, and insinuated that I might be one of the unlucky ones. He runs shorter distances, not marathons. He said I probably know some of "those people" who can do marathons. He, he...lots of masters here came to mind. I'm going to try to prove him wrong about the marathon thing. Otherwise he's been supportive. With all the heart disease, high blood pressure, and diabetes in my family I think running is one of the best things I can do for myself.
 

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Eh, the only thing I can do for my running patients during the course of their full skin exam is amaze them by looking at their feet and saying, "Oh, did you run a marathon about 6 months ago?", as gauged by the length of their newly-grown-in great toenail. That and making sure they wear their sunscreen is about all I have to offer them.<br><br>
But I weirdly have a whole contingent of patients who are runners. One of my patients is a running coach (she won the US Cross Country Masters Championship 3 years ago) and she sends me all the women from her team. They're all wicked fast and put me to shame, so I try not to mention that I'm a runner...<br><br>
--Robin
 

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My dermatologists office is staffed by several runners. both my doc and the main doc who runs the clinic are avid runners. In fact, the other doc, that I don't go to, typically takes home hardware in virtually every race he's in . . . he's way fast.<br><br>
When I went to my doc for the first time last summer, all she had to do was look at my feet also to determine I was a runner. <img alt="roll_eyes.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/roll_eyes.gif">
 

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I can relate to this article. I chose a runner for my cardiologist when I had the SVT problems a couple of years ago. He let me keep running all during the time they were trying to figure out where the problem was. Several of you know about that adventure. I should probably write that up for my blog someday for those who didn't know about it during CR days.<br><br>
Our Family Doctor is also an excellent runner. In fact, he often wins local races and triathlons. He told me I could run through a tendinitis problem I had earlier this year only saying it would take a little longer to heal than not running on it at all, but that I wasn't doing any additional damage.<br><br>
Jen went to a non-running doctor recently thinking she might have a stress fracture. Since she was still running on the leg, the Doc said "there's no way you can have a stress fracture if you are able to still run on it." Two weeks later (after dropping out of the marathon at the halfway mark) she went to our running Family Doctor (she didn't go to him initially because he couldn't see her for a couple of days). He said, "Yep, you have a stress fracture. Stop running on it for awhile." He has her wearing an air boot and has told her crosstraining she can do to stay fit until it heals, plus he is giving her a workout program to safely build mileage back up when the fracture is better.<br><br>
So Yes, I firmly believe that runners should use docs who are also active for sure, and preferably runners themselves.
 

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I just have to post a quick note that looks can be deceptive Several years ago, when I suffered my first stress fracture (I ran 15 miles for the first time, the next day I couldn't run a mile) Anyway, my PCP sent me to the sports med clinic. An morbidly obese Podiatrist took my case. first impressions said maybe this isn't where I should be. He was all business, to the point, but claimed to have Olympic athletes as patients.<br><br>
He said his job was to get me running again as quick as he could. I did like him, he understood runners, even though I was barely a runner then.<br><br>
Dave
 

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My PCP--who I started with before I was running--is disabled and in a wheelchair. He's always been very supportive of my running and, fortunately, I haven't really had any running injuries.
 
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