Runners Forum - Kick Runners banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,886 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been reading training schedules and I notice that they recommend doing more days per week than I am currently doing for the times I am aiming for.<br><br><a href="http://www.coolrunning.com/engine/2/2_4/132.shtml" target="_blank">http://www.coolrunning.com/engine/2/2_4/132.shtml</a><br><br>
My example.<br><br>
I currently run 3-4 days per week, approx 25 miles. This can get seriously messed up by my hiking. Reducing it to 2, 1 or even 0 days!<br><br>
Here they are suggesting a 6-7 day week!<br><br>
Would I benefit more by changing my schedule so that I ran more days even if it was only 2-3 miles (recovery runs) instead of not running.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,653 Posts
There are a lot of factors at play here so it's not simply a matter of increasing mileage to get faster. How is your weight? Carrying any excess poundage? Getting rid of it will result in better times more easily than higher mileage.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,290 Posts
for a half marathon, 3-4 days is fine. Heck! I run only 4 days a week and cross train 2! LOL.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,299 Posts
This is a good question.<br><br>
When I first started out running (as a hobby/pastime), I ran 3-4 times per week, or every other day.<br><br>
After a couple months of regularity, and where my body was handling volume, I added a day. My pattern for a five-day-run-week had me running on all days beside M and F. The resulting schedule dictated 2 days on, 1 day off, 3 days on, 1 day.<br><br>
Increasing from 5 days, to 6 days per week is a big step. Essentially, its 6 days on, 1 day off. This is a step where many distance runners make leaps in improving their times.<br><br>
The next step is from 6 days, to 7 days per week. No rest days. Or, perhaps one rest day every so often. This step, obviously, is a huge step as well.<br><br>
To tie it in with your other question, I think frequency and volume have a proportionate relationship. To increase weekly miles most likely will include one or more extra runs during the week.<br><br>
To echo what tigger says, there are multiple factors involved. Running, on its own, is only part of the equation for improvment. I would not discount the cross-training you do, but understand that certain cross-training activities are more helpful for running improvement than are other activities.<br><br>
If you are looking to improve, I would try to add incrementally. If now averaging 3-4 runs per week, try going for 4-5 days in next cycle. The recommended 6-7 days may be the optimal solution, but it does you no good if all the extra running results in injury or fatigue.<br><br>
Good luck in the next season.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,886 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for all the great information, to answer tigger's question.<br><br>
I am a healthy (except for an old bruised and recovered meniscus cartilage) 21 yo male, I weigh a little under 150lbs.<br><br>
I hike on average two days every other week and try to lift weights 3/4 times per week.<br><br><a href="http://www.coolrunning.com/cgi-bin/log/display.cgi?u=griffiths;s=dave" target="_blank">Running Log</a><br><br>
Again thanks for all the tips, I am just feeling like it's time to really start working and to get back where I was and beyond.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,290 Posts
liath does not hike, he climbs mountains!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,653 Posts
It's not how much you weigh (I'm 205 lbs give or take a couple) but how much bodyfat (and also how much non running muscle) you're carrying. (I am typically around 20% o 24%) In my case I know I can run faster if I could only drop down to around 10% BF, but I have been unsuccessful at doing that. I currently average around 40 mpw (down from last year's 43) with highs around 65 miles and lows in the teens. I don't think I can run much more, as my average is around 8 hrs per week, and that is as much as I can handle. So I am focusing on weight for now, but without much success. I mentioned the non running muscle a bit earlier. If you have a lot of upper body muscle it will slow you down as much as unwanted fat.<br><br>
So as I said earlier, it is not just mileage, but if you are OK in the other departments then I would suggest running more days per week....all the way up to seven if you can.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,886 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'm not heavy, but I am quite broad shouldered.<br>
I am certainly not muscular up to the point of it being a hindrance.<br><br>
Sorry, silly imperial measurements. That would be 170lbs not 150 ???
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top