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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've started to look up marathon training plans.<br><br>
The beginner ones are suggested for a 4 hour marathon.<br>
Those start with 15 mile weeks.<br><br>
Except for the week with shin splints, I've ran between 30 and 50 miles a week for quite a while. (Usually 40+, but if I'm doing a lot of shorter races or coming back from injury, I take it easier.) Last five weeks: 48-42-13 (shin splints)-31-36-- was planning on topping over 40 again this week.<br>
I know I can handle more miles than that without injury if I'm diligent about watching my shoes and not constantly doing hills like I like to do, because I have in the past.<br><br>
What do y'all suggest?<br><br>
Just run and try what feels right for me, which has always been my method, or try to adapt one of these schedules--- and if I adapt one, do I pick a high mileage one and just ignore what they say about time?<br><br>
I'm just not fast. What speed I have is hard work, and while I know I can get faster-- it doesn't come as easy to me as it seems to for some others.<br><br>
(I don't know what I'm aiming for next November yet. I'd like to run a 4:30, but I don't know if that's possible.)
 

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Heather,<br><br>
Several directions you can take, but generally runners can make the improvement by one of the following categories:<br><br>
- Increasing volume (average weekly miles)<br>
- Increasing frequency (number of runs per week)<br>
- Increasing intensity (speed of quality workouts)<br>
- Increasing volume of quality workouts (as a % of weekly miles)<br><br>
Many newer marathoners encounter setbacks when trying to accomplish more than one of these categories at once.<br><br>
Theoretically, it is feasible that increasing only one of these categories will result in an improvement.<br><br>
Also account that you are becoming more experienced now. You will naturally improve, based the physiological adaptations your body has made to previous training, in addition to your past knowledge of what it takes to survive the distance.<br><br>
All things considered, aside from volume and long run miles, I think the best type (bang for your buck) of running for marathoners is to develop lactate threshold. But consider that LT training is not a starting point. Rather, it is a phase of training, as a part of a larger training schedule. Whatever training plan you use, look for one that progresses up to, and includes a phase of LT-type running.<br><br>
Have you learned strides, or stride-outs? This simple drill will help develop your leg turnover without the full intensity of interval training. I encourage my peers to do strides 1-2x sets per week (an investment of 5-7 minutes after an easy run.)<br><br>
Best of luck, and continue to work on consistent weekly miles and number of runs per week. Consistency is better than one good week, followed by a sub-par week.
 

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Heather,<br><br>
I've been following the Pfitzinger/Douglas 18 week, up to 70 miles per week program in training for the Equinox. It is fairly intense. Before I started, I averaged between 40 and 50 miles per week (closer to 50 most of the time, and would sometimes get closer to 60 miles per week).<br><br>
So far I've liked the program. If you think 70 is a bit too much for you, they have a 55 miles per week program too.<br><br>
Good luck finding the plan you want.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ugh, I remember those from when I ran with the cross-country team back in Highschool.<br><br>
I suppose I will have to add back in those things I last did when I actually was reasonably fast.<br><br>
Geez, that was... 6 years ago.<br><br>
I've been running for a long time. <img alt="biggrin.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/biggrin.gif">
 
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