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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been searching and searching.<br><br>
Several months ago, perhaps even longer, someone here mentioned a way of eating that was made up of mostly vegetables. Leans chicken and fish sparingly (if at all.) Whole grains. Little or no red meat. No cheese. Low fat. Nuts sparingly, especially walnuts.<br><br>
I thought it was the "mediterranean"diet. But that's not it. I'm thinking it was the name of a person.<br><br>
gah!<br><br>
Rambling.<br><br>
No one's gonna know what the heck I'm talking about!!!!<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.kickrunners.com/forum/images/smilies/sad2.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="sad2">
 

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There are a lot of commercial diets based off of the Mediterranean lifestyle. What you are describing would be on par to something someone has packaged based on it's principles and tried to market.<br><br>
You might check some of the info out here.<br><br><a href="http://www.oldwayspt.org/med_pyramid.html" target="_blank">http://www.oldwayspt.org/med_pyramid.html</a>
 

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Is there a more specific plan/website on that Mediterranean diet? Every time you post it I look at it and don't get a whole lot of specifics on it, unless I'm missing something. I like a lot of the stuff they eat in that region.
 

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Well, it's more a way of doing things and living than it is a laid out plan of daily meals or anything like that....And at it's base, it is extremely simple.<br><br>
There are some sites out there that expand on it a little. This one is selling a book but they do have a lot of recipes posted and some general info that might help. <a href="http://www.mediterrasian.com/index.htm" target="_blank">http://www.mediterrasian.com/index.htm</a><br><br>
To lose weight, every diet on the planet is going to have to work the same. You have to burn more calories than you intake. This isn't so much about losing weight, though. It's "diet" defined as what you eat everyday... you know... not "diet" as in something you start and stop. It's more way of life... it's about eating very well but very healthy. The foods are very bold with flavor.<br><br>
It's not about taking a normal American meal of a meat and three sides and substituting all the ingredients with things labeled low fat or low cal or light or anything even close to that.<br><br>
I know I'm going to fight a battle with food and weight the rest of my life. The up side to this on the Mediterranean lifestyle is this.... If I overeat, at least I'm not eating foods thats bad for me. And, I enjoy what I eat now more than anything I ever ate before and I was raised hardcore all southern/texas/mexican foods all the time and believe me, all the women in my family can seriously <i>cook.</i><br><br>
I swear... I honestly don't miss anything about the way I used to eat and while granted, I ate a lot, what I ate was what most Americans eat every single day of the week.<br><br>
There have been many things that I used to love and even crave that when revisiting them now... it's really hard to believe I ever held these foods up in such high esteem. And now, many of them laden in dairy and animal fat will do a number on my gastronomical system. There are also many dishes that I can eat with very simple changes.<br><br>
As a foodie, the thing that finally rang the bells of understanding for me when I was trying to figure it all out was "peasant food." And that spans almost all cultures and society's on the planet. The fresh grown stuff of the day mixed in with whatever was caught, raised, or killed.<br><br>
With the use of whole grain products and using olive, canola, grapeseed oils instead of butter, it's pretty much any pasta stir fry, any asian stir fry, most Thai and Vietnamese foods we're familiar with... soups, stews, casseroles,... think red beans and rice, jambalaya, gumbo, tacos, enchiladas, stuffed pitas, pizza, Paella, salads, lots of fish and seafood stuff, shishkabobs, etc....<br><br>
No, not any of the many cream based variations of those apply...<br><br>
Meat is simply an ingredient or a side dish. It's not a slab of meat and sides. Unless it's fish, it's only a main course on very special occasions.... holidays, etc... In a lot of regions, fish was a main dish several times a week.<br><br>
Rich desserts candies and cakes and pies, etc, these weren't additions to every meal, they were done at holidays and birthdays. And no, not every birthday at the office applies to this... lol<br><br>
Hell, I'm not good at explaining it all, but I think I could answer questions about it pretty well if that might help...
 

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<br>
How the heck are Thai and Asian foods considered Mediterranean? I was thinking more of the fresh veggies, liberal use of olive oil, lean grilled fish and meats, and grains of Italy and Greece. That's more what I was hoping for. I like stir fry and all, but I am a particular fan of real Italian food, not what Americans call Italian, but the stuff they eat in Tuscany and the seaport regions. They eat a lot of fish where it readily available, etc.....and good breads and cheeses, but not an excess of them. I often get inspired by watching Giada DeLaurentis, even though I don't really like her, because she does the more natural, not cream or butter laden like Mario Battali, Italian foods.<br><br>
I'll check out that second website and maybe some books at the library. It's not a hot topic because it's never reached the "fad" status of the popular diets, but if you look at health statistics for the region, they are pretty darn good. I know a lot of it is the lifestyle in general, lots of walking, cycling and working out of doors, but still.....it's good general philosophy. And as a foodie, a way of eating that encourages creativity in cooking and allows me variety in the foods I eat is mandatory. I can't deal with these ridiculous restrictive faddy diets.
 

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Well, obviously not because of region! lol<br><br>
It got it's name from the famous study done in that region and maybe more specifically, Crete. The study tried to identify the aspects of their life that seemed to be responsible for their overall good health. It wasn't the specific ingredients or spices found only in that region...<br><br>
Like you said, it's really more about lifestyle... It's a way of doing things and cooking things... whole grains, veggies and fruits, fish and lean meats... all things available in most regions of the world and thats really part of the beauty of it. One can enjoy elements from all the worlds cuisines when following it's principles.<br><br>
For instance, If you look at so many of the different Asian Stir fries and Italian stir fries, if you remove the grain(pasta or rice) and the seasoning you have very similar combinations of ingredients and certainly very similar ways of preparation. Same with the regional soups and stews. Maybe think food groups as opposed to specific ingredients....
 

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That's a good idea!!! Being a foodie does make healthy eating easier, if you like to cook you are more willing to take the time to prepare healthy, shop more frequently, like they also do in Europe, and research recipes using new ingredients you don't know what to do with. I do feel sorry for peeps who don't like to cook....it makes things much harder.<br><br>
I did look at that second website and it was much more what I was looking for originally!!! Thanks!
 

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I agree. I think thats why so many hit the fast food places on the way home from work. Well, that and they are exhausted. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.kickrunners.com/forum/images/smilies/sad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Sad"><br><br>
I do think a lot of people who don't like to cook would find this way of preparing food much easier than the "norm".<br><br>
You do a lot of very simple two pot meals. It's mostly chopping several different ingredients and preparing them all in one pan. Sometimes you might add pasta or rice and your done. So many of the dishes are easily completed in the time it takes to boil the water and cook the pasta or rice. Sometimes you throw it all together and bake it.<br><br>
With soups and stews, it's pretty much just a one pot affair.<br><br>
For instance, there is no telling how many meal variations you can do with a simple base of squash, zucchini, onions, and peppers. Almost all easily completed in less than 15 mins and many are quite different from each other only by adding one ingredient or spice.<br><br>
It really is a very simple way to cook, but I think foodies tend to really love it because it's basically centered on doing something they really enjoy doing... combining whatever you have in the fridge into something extremely flavorful and healthy more or less on the fly.<br><br>
It's not that much different than how they did it... whatever was in the garden that was fresh or ripe that day combined with whatever they had in the cellar or cooler....<br><br>
I also think it expands upon how a foodie views recipe possibilities because you do so much winging it with what are essentially the root ingredients of so many different cuisines.<br><br>
You see what one little ingredient change adds or subtracts. With some of the regional Italian dishes you'll find the only real difference in ingredients is the addition of a tomato based sauce. Often times all the other ingredients are all sauteed in Olive oil and served over pasta sans the red sauce. Same ingredients in a white wine sauce with shrimp... it's really a different dish.<br><br>
When you get right down to it, it's the same stuff chopped up and tossed in with some kind of stock or even water that makes up the root ingredients of so many of the basic soups and stews. And most everything sprung from the basics...<br><br>
For me, it's also changed the way I shop... I shop for ingredients now more than I shop for ingredients for a recipe. If something looks good, I'll buy it and then go from there.<br><br>
Sorry to ramble on.. I admit it is a passion! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.kickrunners.com/forum/images/smilies/biggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Very Happy">
 

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For me too! Ramble at will....I love talking food with people who actually "get it." What's cool about the whole "Iron Chef" concept of doing something creative with whatever's in the fridge is that for me, it even is influencing my snacking. Today I was trying to decide what I wanted to eat and as I poked in the fridge I found a zucchini that needed to be cooked ASAP so I just sliced, steamed and added a little garlic powder and voila! Healthy, flavorful snack much better than Pop Tarts.<br><br>
I was out to lunch with friends yesterday and my friend Paula made a good point about how she approaches desserts and sweet things. She is also a foodie. She says that now it's either "something of quality" or she doesn't want it. Which I thought was cool. Oreos, Pop Tarts, for what? Just to say you had something sweet? I'd rather make a berry crisp or some Cooking Light banana bread, something I made myself and had some control over what went into it if I am going to eat something "naughty."<br><br>
I do that too with the shopping, and I have started to shop in small doses more frequently, much like they do in Europe. It's not a big deal to pick up fresh fish for tonight's dinner on the way home or extra goodies for a veggie medley because I know I will actually MAKE them, as opposed to stocking up on Sunday for the week and throwing half of it out because I didn't have time to cook it all.<br><br>
Funny you should mention the sauce thing, I was raised on Italian food and ALWAYS with tomato based sauces. I couldn't imagine eating pasta with just garlic and oil. Yuck. Last week I decided I could make a healthier version of one of those Bertolli frozen pasta thingies so I did: garlic, a little chicken broth, white wine, almost like a white clam sauce, but with shrimp, tomato, spinach, mushrooms, I forget what else. It was SO GOOD!!!!<br><br>
Cooking rocks!
 

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Oh, Tricia, it wasn't the Skinny Bitch diet that Jenna was talking about in the PRT, was it? I think hers is primarily vegan though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
no, I don't think it was that one.<br><br>
Speaking of peppers, squash and veggies found in the fridge. I made THE best stir fry out of stuff found in my fridge. It was kind of the "I better make this stuff before it goes bad kinda dish." Red and Green Peppers, green onions, squash, celery, carrots, a frozen bag of "asian" veggie mix (edamame, snap peas, baby corn) tossed it all in a wok with some cooked chicken, soy sauce, and a little sesame oil at the finish.<br><br>
Threw basmati rice in a rice cooker.<br><br>
Done and done. It probably took all of 30 minutes or so.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The ORNISH diet!!<br><br>
That's what it was. And boy did I remember it wrong. No wonder you all thought I was talking about the mediterranean diet!<br><br><a href="http://www.webmd.com/diet/ornish-diet-what-it-is" target="_blank">http://www.webmd.com/diet/ornish-diet-what-it-is</a>
 

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The Dean Ornish diet is pretty hardcore. Feedback has been tough... it's considered a very hard diet to stay on. I don't think his numbers justify the sacrifice unless, you pretty much eat that way now and are really happy, or you have brutally <i>severe</i> Heart Disease.<br><br>
There is way too much out there now that says good fats are beneficial to your heart.
 

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Well, yeah, very good point!<br><br>
I guess the thing about Dean and his diet that I think is telling is he hasn't modified anything about it based on any information that has come out since he laid it down. To him it's like a Bible... "I laid these laws down for ever and always and they will forever be the law of the land!"
 

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Hey fatman, I found a book at the library I thought you might like, based on our discussions above. I think I am going to buy this one!<br><br><img alt="" src="http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/510qKTO5wML._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-dp-500-arrow,TopRight,45,-64_OU01_AA240_SH20_.jpg" style="border:0px solid;">
 

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Interesting!<br><br>
I have a couple of books around here somewhere. Remind me after the holidays and I'll see if I can find them. Your welcome to them.
 

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I lost 20+ pounds on Ornish, about 20 years ago. He convinced me, and I believe in his method, since I also kept the weight off. I have adhered to the principles pretty much over the years, and cannot find anything wrong with it.<br>
I was living alone, which helped, and when I met DH, he was a hard-core runner who did not object to eating this way either, although he sneaks in the occasional candy and cookie. Can't blame him.
 
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