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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi ya'll,<br><br>
I was just hoping to get some opinions. I think I'm going to eventually have to go to the doctor on this one. I've been having some ongoing left knee pain for the past few weeks. It usually kicks in about 2 miles into my run or so.<br><br>
The pain has always been kind of bad, but I can still run through it. Its located on the outside part of my left knee about halfway down it. Like if you drew a horizontal line at the middle of my knee, it pretty much hurts from the middle around the side and sometimes in the back as well. I was thinking it might be an IT band thing so I've been doing a lot of extra stretching. However, on my 6 mile run yesterday I experienced this a few times: The knee pain started around mile 3, the usual trouble, and hurt like that for the rest of the run. But then at some points it would have a really sharp pain and it'd lock up and I'd have to stop abruptly for a few seconds because it would be too painful to move. Then it'd go back to its normal hurting which I am able to run through.<br><br>
Any ideas/opinions on this?? Thanks a lot for you help! sorry this is so long.
 

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Hey Megs - this does sound like an IT band issue to me. Unfortunately, with ITBS, using stretching exclusively almost certainly won't make it go away. It sounds like you've reached a point where it's gotten somewhat chronic.<br><br>
For best results, you probably need to cut running out of the routine for two to three weeks minimum. In the meantime, do the stretching, but you'll also need to work on strengthening your various gluteus muscles, especially the medius. If you haven't gotten a foam roller yet, get yourself one and concentrate on rolling exercises to get the knots out of that IT band. This <a href="http://runningtimes.com/rt/articles/?id=6099&page=2&c=372" target="_blank">Running Times Article</a> gives you a good lowdown on all that stuff<br><br>
During this period, it would be a good time to get in exercise that you might not normally have in the routine, such as ab/core work, pilates, or maybe even some yoga or swimming.<br><br>
After that time off, build up slowly by integrating walking in with your running. Also make sure that you've got the right shoes for your gait and/or that the shoes aren't worn out.
 

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So Smaht! Exactly right! A big problem with runners is that we move exclusively in a forward direction. Absolutely no lateral motion or backward motion. So we overuse the same muscles over and over and over. In my opinion, one of the best things runners could do would be to cross train one day a week with some sort of group fitness class like step or kickboxing or sports conditioning to force them to use different planes of motion. Also, side to side lunges or reverse lunges can help with this too.
 

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megs, it sounds like you are experiencing what i just went through and becca (TJOCF) was really helpful with stretching exercises.. heres a cut and paste of what she suggested (similar to the other poster's advice here!)<br><br>
"Missy- Runner's knee is just inflammation of the tendons surrounding the knee. This is caused when there is a muscular problem (ie-trigger points) in the quadricep and/or the IT band. Do you have access to a foam roller, a wooden rolling pin or the STICK? If so, I can try to virtually help you release the trigger points and then stretch. The key is that stretching alone can worsen the problem unless you release those "knots" that are holding portions of the muscle in contraction.<br><br>
Extend your leg and flex it. See the lump on the outside of the thigh just above the knee? Try relaxing the leg by propping it up and press deep into the muscle. Work your way along that muscle which runs on a slight diagonal up to the hip "pokey-outey" bone. Then start again at that spot and massage deeply up the outside of the leg in a straight line. Next use the rolling pin or what ever and press hard into the muscle rolling up and down. Try really hard to keep your leg relaxed. When you are done. Stretch the quad and the IT band very well. Good luck!"<br><br><br>
the thing that helped most was that i really took it easy for about 10 days with minimum running and lots of x-training. i also did some icing and stretching per becca's advice. it really helped. heres some healing vibes for you...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you all very much for your suggestions and advice! I would like to add I just got new shoes at the beginning of December and they're Brooks but the equivalent of the Mizuno's I had been running in. I got them at the same running store I got my last 2 pairs of shoes from, the first time being when I had my gait analyzed. Maybe it has changed over the past year and a half or so, though.<br><br>
I was doing a lot of weight lifting last Spring, but now I just swim 1-2 days a week. Swimming was my main sport in high school and I'm very strong at it. What if I mixed in some water running in deep water with a foam belt? I have a STICK also, would that work the same as a foam roller?<br><br>
thanks again for your help!
 

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The STICK works fine but I find that it is only really effective if someone else does it for you. When you try to apply pressure to yourself, your muscles tense and then it is ineffective. Lay on your side with the effected leg/hip pointing to the ceiling. Star at the hip and roll down the length of the upper leg to the thigh, start gently and then add increasing pressure. When you find a tender spot stroke across that spot several times increasing the pressure. It is important that the person being rolled stays relaxed, so if the pressure gets to be too much that you tense, it needs to be backed off. The person being rolled needs to constantly check their tension level....YOU HAVE TO RELAX YOUR MUSCLES. If a spot just will not give in to the STICK, have your partner use their elbow so they can have a more focused/concentrated pressure on the area. Use this same method to roll the quadricep muscle that starts at the "lump" just above and to the ouside of your knee.
 
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