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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone take it? Why?
 

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EFFECTS OF PROTEIN AND AMINO-ACID SUPPLEMENTATION ON ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE<br><br>
Richard B Kreider PhD<br><br>
Exercise & Sport Nutrition Laboratory, Department of Human Movement Sciences & Education, The University of Memphis, Memphis, Tennessee 38152. Email: kreider.richard=AT=coe.memphis.edu<br><br>
Sportscience 3(1), <a href="http://sportsci.org/jour/9901/rbk.html" target="_blank">sportsci.org/jour/9901/rbk.html</a>, 1999 (5579 words)<br><br>
Reviewed by Brian Leutholtz PhD, Department of Exercise Science, Physical Education, and Recreation, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia<br><br><br>
"Anabolic Amino Acids<br><br>
One of the commonly purported benefits of amino acid supplementation is that certain amino acids (e.g., arginine, histidine, lysine, methionine, ornithine, and phenylalanine) may stimulate the release of growth hormone, insulin, and/or glucocorticoids, thereby promoting anabolic processes (Kreider, 1993). There is some clinical evidence that amino acid supplementation may stimulate growth hormone releasing factors and/or growth hormone release (Carlson, et al., 1989;; Garlick and Grant, 1988; Iwasaki et al., 1987; Merimee et al., 1969). For example, intravenous arginine and ornithine infusion have been used clinically for stimulating growth hormone release (Carlson et al., 1989; Iwasaki et al., 1987). In addition, preliminary clinical studies indicated that protein (20 to 60 g); arginine and lysine (1.2 g); and ornithine (70 mg/kg) increased growth hormone and somatomedin concentrations in the blood (Bucci et al., 1990; Jackson et al., 1968; Isidori et al., 1981). However, other researchers have not replicated these findings, particularly in healthy individuals (Lemon, 1991). There is also little evidence that supplementation of these amino acids during training significantly affects body composition, strength, and/or muscle hypertrophy (Kreider, 1999). Consequently, the effects of amino acid supplementation on growth-hormone release and training adaptations are as yet unclear."<br><br>
Ron- the important thing to know about supplements like these is that they are NOT regulated by the FDA. In the studies cited above, people were studied taking doctor-prescribed, pure "clean" doses of the amino acids. If you go to GNC and buy something or get it from the Internet, god only knows what ELSE it's got in it, or how it's been manufactured or by whom. Not a chance I'd be willing to take.<br><br>
jen
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
DW accidently bought some. My General DR has me trying Lysine and arginine to see if we can get my foliculitis under control (basically random pimple like deals in hair folicles). I'm not sure the mechanics, but this combo does work.<br><br>
When I googled it I found similar. It's from GNC. Curious why you feel GNC is like something from the internet? I guess my assumption is that since they're a big corp, they'd be more strict about making sure that it's got mostly what it's supposed to have in it - even if that something is completely useless <img alt="biggrin.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/biggrin.gif">
 

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IMO, GNC is a company out to make money just like any other. They sell lots of stuff that are well tested and likely to be completely safe. Unfortunately, there is no regulation of supplements, and so even GNC can't know what's in the products they sell. Maybe they know what's in their own branded stuff, but they sell other brands, too. They sell tons of "miracle weight loss supplements," right? So they can't be totally on the up-and-up.<br><br>
When the Ford Co realized that the Pinto would explode upon rear-end collision, they also decided it would be cheaper just to pay out on each incident rather than recall the whole line of cars. Until they got lots of bad publicity, that is. In Ayn Rand's world, big businesses would always do the right thing because it would be in their best economic interest. Unfortunately, I think she was a bit idealistic!
 
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