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<p>We "bestshored" some of our IT services a few years back.  I have caught some of our employees using Inglish terms:</p>
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<p>"Please revert as soon as possible"  (Please respond...)</p>
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<p>"Please do the needful"  (Please do what is necessary, or more pointed... do your damn job)</p>
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<p>"Today morning... or afternoon...  or evening"  (This morning or afternoon or evening).</p>
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Actually the last one is kind of cute.  If one can say "Yesterday morning", why not "Today morning"?</p>
 

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<p>Since I've been in the Colonies, I heard crazy things like</p>
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<p>"Momentarily" meaning "in a moment" rather than "for a moment"</p>
<p>"Pavement" meaning the bit the cars drive up and down on, rather than the bit people walk on, and silliest of all,</p>
<p>"5 am in the morning"</p>
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<p>Of course 5 am is in the morning!!!</p>
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<p>You guys <img alt="" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/rolleyes.gif" title=""></p>
 

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<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Grizzly</strong> <a href="/forum/thread/70428/inglish-divided-by-a-common-language#post_1950740"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><br><p>"Please do the needful"  (Please do what is necessary, or more pointed... do your damn job)</p>
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My Indian guys say this all the time.  And I know what it means, but I find it interesting that your guys say it too.  Is this a common phrase in places other than North America?  It sounds grammatically incorrect.</p>
 

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<p>Not in England<br>
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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Tech Tee</strong> <a href="/forum/thread/70428/inglish-divided-by-a-common-language#post_1950788"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><br><br><p><br>
My Indian guys say this all the time.  And I know what it means, but I find it interesting that your guys say it too.  Is this a common phrase in places other than North America?  It sounds grammatically incorrect.</p>
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<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>bap</strong> <a href="/forum/thread/70428/inglish-divided-by-a-common-language#post_1950880"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>Not in England<br>
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<p><br>
Well, when was the last time you were in England?  I mean, I know they have a large Indian population there, but I have been friends with Indian-turned Americans for 30 years and I never heard this phrase until 2 years ago, when I started working with Indians who were still living in India.  Wonder if it's regional.</p>
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
<p>It might be regional Inglish.  Our guys are from Southern India, Chenai (old Madras) and Bangalore.  What's interesting is that English IS something they've learned from early childhood, it IS a mother tongue. </p>
 

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<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Grizzly</strong> <a href="/forum/thread/70428/inglish-divided-by-a-common-language#post_1950936"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>It might be regional Inglish.  Our guys are from Southern India, Chenai (old Madras) and Bangalore.  What's interesting is that English IS something they've learned from early childhood, it IS a mother tongue. </p>
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<br><br><p>My guys are NOW are all from Bangalore, but, they grew up all over the place....so...who knows.</p>
 

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<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Grizzly</strong> <a href="/forum/thread/70428/inglish-divided-by-a-common-language#post_1950936"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border-bottom:0px solid;border-left:0px solid;border-top:0px solid;border-right:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>It might be regional Inglish.  Our guys are from Southern India, Chenai (old Madras) and Bangalore.  What's interesting is that English IS something they've learned from early childhood, it IS a mother tongue. </p>
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<br><br><p> My wife's firm has a a large office in Chenai also.  We laugh about "doing the needful" at home all the time.  "Please do the needful" has made it's way into her every day work vocabulary.  Apparently lots of people in North America have picked it up.  Though, I think it's sort of tongue in cheek when said amongst the North Americans.</p>
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<p>In addition to the ones you mentioned, I also like "prepone".  Prepone is the opposite of postpone.  As in, I can't make your 3 o'clock meeting.  I'm availabe at 1 o'clock if you're willing to prepone the meeting.</p>
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<p>Methinks Bap is suffering from PA syndrome.  <img alt="biggrin.gif" class="bbcode_smiley" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies//biggrin.gif"></p>
 

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<p> </p>
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Mrtambalynman</strong> <a href="/forum/thread/70428/inglish-divided-by-a-common-language#post_1951305"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border-right:0px solid;border-top:0px solid;border-left:0px solid;border-bottom:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>I need to do the needful very badly right now. </p>
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<p>OK, that made me laugh. </p>
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<p>But I still want to know!  How the hell did such incorrect grammar become a common phrase in India?  And, why do none of my Indian friends (who, admitedly, have been here for 20 or 30 years), not know about it?  Is this a phrase that has only come about in the last few years?</p>
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
<p>You see, I don't think that it is incorrect grammar at all if you apply the same rationale to it as is applied to Merkun English. </p>
 
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