Runners Forum - Kick Runners banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So in a few short weeks I will be running my longest race ever - ten miles. I am really enjoying doing the long distances, and for the first time in my running career, my body is tolerating ten miles really well. So I've decided to go for some distance goals.<br><br>
But I have no clue how to plan a macro-cycle for a running schedule. When I'm not officially training for a race, WHAT DO I DO, especially with respect to the long run?! I want to keep my mileage up so that I'm ready to go if I find a great race (or if I get into a fall marathon). But I am wondering if continuing to just build my long run mileage without a goal race is going to be hard on my body.<br><br>
My thinking is that maybe I should keep my long runs around 10-12-14. But if so, how? Alternate? Do 10, 12, cutback week like you would for race training?<br><br>
Thanks in advance!<br><br>
Oh, if it helps, currently I'm doing one long run of 9-10 miles, one run of about 6 miles with 3 at tempo, and an easy 4-5 miler. I would definitely consider adding an additional running day, as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,652 Posts
If you're looking to maintain your fitness, you can probably do so with a LR in the 10-12 range along with your other midweek runs. I wouldn't fret too much about doing 10 one week, 12 the next, etc. Just pay attention to how you feel.<br><br>
If you're looking to build base for a fall marathon, then you probably need to have a more structured plan where you build up a few weeks on the length of your long run and then cut back. If you can build to the point where you can run a 14 mile long run, you're in GREAT position to start a 12-16 week beginner marathon program (in fact, you're probably well ahead of the curve!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,230 Posts
It sounds like what you might be trying to do - or leaning towards doing - is basebuilding. This is an <a href="http://www.teamoregon.com/publication/online/marathon/planspac.html" target="_blank">approach to marathon basebuilding</a> I found that was put together by ORRRC (Team Oregon?). It seems well thought out and you may find it useful. You always have to own your training so maybe it will only be a place to start.<br><br>
Hope that helps,<br>
Billy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,936 Posts
If training for a 10 mile race you are in great shape -<br><br>
I would 1st add a 4th run 4 easy miles after a week or 2 of that I would take the 9-10 long run to 10-12 for a couple of weeks. I would consider adding 6 striders at the end of one of the easy runs<br><br>
Strider = 1st build up speed over the 1st 40-50 meters to almost as fast as you can without straining (Maybe 400 meter speed) then you relax and hold it for 20-40 meters. Take a walk or very light jog for a minute of 2 between each strider.<br><br>
Eventually I would consider either building the long to 12-14 or add a 5th run or both. But take your time in adding mileage. After 3-4 weeks of more mileage, you usually take a recovery week where you do much less mileage (70% of what you were doing)<br><br>
Have fun - Good running to you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
605 Posts
It seems like you are getting to the point where you really need to understand basic training principles. If so, I suggest you get a good running book. Here are a couple of suggestions:<br><br>
Daniels' Running Formula, by Jack Daniels<br>
The Competitive Runner's Handbook by Bob Glover<br>
Road Racing for Serious Runners, by Pete Pfitzinger and Scott Douglas<br><br>
Any of these books should give you a good foundation on which to build a training plan.<br><br>
If you are just training for fitness, then don't worry too much about a plan. Listen to your body. If you're feeling good, run more, if not, cut back. Finish all your runs feeling like you could have done a little more.<br><br>
Victor
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
This is what I did over the winter. I was coming off of a fall marathon and decided to maintain a half decent base, figuring that I would be that far ahead of the game when it came time to prepare for the HM I am running in late April. My long run was 10-12 miles, depending on the weather and how I felt. I also didn't bother with any speed work. I ran everything at an easy pace.<br><br>
I entered a 10K in early February so I would have a guide as to what pace to shoot for when I added tempo runs in preparation for the HM. I was pleasantly surprised when I ran the 10K @ 2 minutes per mile less than what I had been training at. I've since increased my mileage a bit and added a mid week tempo run.<br><br>
After the HM I plan on going back to the winter time schedule for the rest of the summer. The only thing I may do is add a tempo run every other week just to keep myself race ready. I don't have any plans to run any races longer than a HM for rest of the year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks everyone! As usual, super helpful advice.<br><br>
I actually have Bob Glover's <span style="text-decoration:underline;">Competitive Runner's Handbook</span>. Haven't looked at it in a while, but I think it's time to dust it off - thanks for the suggestion!<br><br>
Do you do speedwork, etc when you're not training for a specific race? Is this part of your regular off-season training also?
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top