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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm trying to reduce my late-in-the-race stomach issues (nausea, side stitches, down right revolting, refusal to take in anything with taste) and wondering what voodoo, home remedies, or other fixes the group has good results with. I've read in some ultra sites that taking in ginger tames the upset belly, but haven't tried this yet.<br><br>
Stories?<br>
Comments?<br>
Recommendations of what NOT to try?
 

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Have you tried the chewable Pepto or Rolaids. I take them to help with the gassy or sour stomach feeling.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've only done 3 tri races (of >6 hours) where I have found that this is a problem, and it comes about in the last hour of my bike. Much has been related to my nutrition, which I've dialed in recently.<br><br>
I want to pack some things to take, some items will anti gas type.
 

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I know your not gonna want to hear this, but you need to fix this by changing your nutrition. This is something you need to work out in training.<br><br>
OK that being said, I find after the IM swim I am full of gas. I gulp more air into my stomach than into my lungs. The only thing that works to help the bloating is Gas X. I know I'm gonna need it so I take 2 tabs in t1 and then carry 2 tabs out on the bike.<br><br>
You need to try these things while training so have some beans for dinner the night befopre a big ride... Just kidding. take the pills beofre the ride to see if you can stomach them.<br><br>
As for side stitches. Belly breathing will help, but finding the cause will help more. I found if I eat any solids after the 1/4 way mark, I'm in trouble on the run. So it's all liquids for me. (gels and liquid concentrate)<br><br>
Good luck<br><br>
CS
 

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1!<br><br>
I've learned that for the average athlete with no health issues, just about the only cause of stomach upset comes from poor race nutrition. This stems from short race to long, from standalone swims and bikes and runs, to marathons and road races, and to triathlons, to name a few.<br><br>
Also, from my experience of witnessing others (including myself) the number one problem for most people is that they are dehydrated, especially in standalone foot races. Triathlons are similar but when you get to long course many people screw up the nutrition with either too little, too much, or not the right mix for themselves.<br><br>
Short races you can power through with little regard to nutrition or hydration; longer races you cannot.
 

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Ginger chews are good for nausea during races. Very easy to carry with you, they do the trick well. I do agree that nutrition is most important. Also, the electrolyte supplement you take can be a big factor in that as well. I found my stomach was much better with Succeed! than Endurolytes. It is just trial and error, unfortunatly.
 

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I haven't tried Succeed! but I can agree that Endurolytes, for me, are crap. Those things suck me dry every single time I take them. It's weird because as soon as I pop one I stop sweating, which gets strange and totally throws off my hydration and nutrition when it's 85 degress out and I should be sweating. E-caps are decent, but for me I train and race with Thermolytes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
<br>
Smart a$$!<br><br><br><br>
CS tri-tip -- frijole loading!<br><br><img alt="" src="http://www.a2zlanguages.com/a2z/images/Mexico/frijoles.jpg" style="border:0px solid;"><br><br>
Actually I save the hot wings for next day reward!<br><br>
Actually from my previous 2 IM, I get out of the water perfectly fine. Once on the bike I took in nothing but PowerBar Endurance, normal strength with on GU on the hour, and Endurolytes. However, last IM bike I made the mistake of taking in Gatorade and that was the fuel that lit the 'pissed off stomach' fire - I was fighting that fire for the rest of the race. So, I've devised a drink formula with CarboPro and PowerBar Endurance, which my stomach just loves. I won't have to take in any GUs as the caloric intake is ~350 cal/hr. Again this is tested. When I train my long bike rides of 5+ hours, even with prolonged exposure of my HR in z3, my stomach is fine. Styling.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
<br>
Actually, that's part of my renewed nutrition, S-Caps over E-Caps. They do keep me hydrating very well. Thanks!<br><br>
Thank Merigayle!
 

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Same problem with E-lytes. Same problem with T-lytes. I'm now using Lava salts. Small caps and way less needed.<br><br>
CS
 

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I always wanna hurl after the swim. Why is that?<br><br>
My only advice to you is...<br><br>
4-6 cliff bars during a century is WAY TOO MUCH FIBER...
 

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This is a different face of a problem that I struggle with in ultras: keeping the mix right all the way through a long race. The way I look at it it's like a car with very good wheel alignment: you can point it straight and take your hands off the wheel and everything will be fine for quite a while, but if you wait long enough eventually you'll go off the road.<br><br>
I was asking another local ultrarunner about this - she was one of the faster of the Grand Slammers last year so I figured she would know how to figure it out. She has her crew carry her own scale along (so it's repeatable) and she weighs any time they have access to her. She has contigency nutrition plans that they switch her to if she's badly under or over.<br><br>
My guess would be either under or over hydrated, or under on sodium (unless you pop pills like candy) or over on the CHO component of the fluid you're putting in. Most likely (IMO) is mild-moderate hyponatremia combined with mild dehydration. Typically that takes 2-4 hours before it gets to the point that it manifests as nausea.<br><br>
If that's what it is, fixing the nausea symptom of hyponatremia by taking ginger chews without addressing the underlying problem is a great way to end up in the hospital. OTOH, I've seen projectile vomiting from people who were in no serious trouble.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks Hippo.<br><br>
Those are good points. Last IM, I tried to 'run' on the Gatorade Endurance, which was a stupid mistake, as I know (and knew) that it's something I couldn't stomach. But my plan was to take a 20oz handheld and refill at every 3 aid stations (about every 3 miles). But as I mentioned, I really couldn't stand drinking that stuff, and yes I was quite dehydrated at the finish -- zero sweating, clammy, shivers, disorentation. This year I will likely run with my camelbak with my CarboPro/PowerBar Endurance mix so I can have what my stomach will tolerate, and some dry mix in my drop, plus carry my S-Caps and any other remedy to 'easy the quease'. It's how I train for marathons so don't ask me why I don't do the run section this way......I think I was installed with an 'a-b-normal' brain!
 

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My experience comes from ultras, rather than long course triathlons, so take my input with a grain of salt. <img alt="wink.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/wink.gif"> Lots of recommends from the sodium/electrolyte aspect, but I address the carbohydrate needs.<br><br>
In regard to the original question about stomach issues, my first thought was simple sugars as the culprit. It's no secret that Gatorade/Powerade and the like have fructose and sucrose as a carb source. After comsuming Gatorade for an extended period I've found that my stomach rebels. I've found a carb replacement drink (also from Succeed!) that doesn't have the simple sugars. It's called ULTRA, and it's composed with maltodextrin as the source of carbs and without the sugars. I found that I can drink this as my main drink (as like water) for the duration of a long ultra without the stomach duress.<br><br>
I'd like to say that it works up to distances of 100 miles or more, but my experience shows that a little stomach duress is normal in races of that length. <img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif"><br><br>
Hope this info helps.
 

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Something else to consider is CarboPro 1200 - if CarboPro suits you. I have found it immensely better than the gatorade-type-stuff. Less to haul too on long event.<br><br>
However, I guess the only thing I have to add is that if you're getting nailed at the end of the bike, and the bike is supposed to be your rolling buffet... that should really be your clue that your nutrition plan is out the door. So have backup plan B in play just in case. Have a plan, practice the plan, but have an alternate in case the day goes weird.<br><br>
-- info re: carbopro1200<br>
There are SIX servings in a bottle, each serving worth 200 calories of pure energy. Each 80 mL / 2.6 fl oz serving provides 50 grams of carbohydrates (200 calories), plus 150 mg of Sodium & 100 mg of Potassium to replace electrolytes.<br><br>
Product information<br><br>
CarboPro 1200 is a balanced solution of four different forms of easily digestible and highly absorbable carbohydrates. CarboPro 1200 contains four different kinds of substrates (a substrate is a substance acted upon by a digestive enzyme) in a 16oz bottle - the equivalent of 8 bottles of other sports drinks or 12 gels. A solution with more substrates stimulates the activation of more transport mechanisms in the intestinal lumen than solutions with less substrates. Therefore, during the digestion process, more carbohydrates are transported out of the small intestine and are absorbed into the blood which, in turn, enhances a greater absorption rate of water (optimized hydration) into the bloodstream via osmosis. Thus, the higher activation rate of transport mechanisms by the four different types of carbohydrates in CarboPro 1200, in addition to the increased function of osmosis, facilitates faster energy release and increased hydration. What does this mean to you? In a few words, it's great for performance!<br><br>
Sugars that can be found in Carbo Pro 1200 are:<br><br>
Ribose: a five-carbon sugar (pentose) found primarily in ribonucleic acid; increases the rate at which ATP is generated, improves performance.<br><br>
Trehalose: a disaccharide, does not promote excessive insulin release; quick gastric emptying; sustained energy release; balances dehydration/reyhdration cycle; an antioxidant; is “toothfriendly.”<br><br>
Dextrose: a monosaccharide; identical to glucose found in blood; absorbed rapidly for surge of energy; quickly activates transport mechanism.<br><br>
Also in Carbo Pro 1200:<br><br>
CARBO-PRO: a patented, proprietary glucose polymer; polymerized to obtain optimal chain lengths for quick gastric emptying without excessive insulin release. Provides sustained energy release for longer periods; forms the base substrate for all the other carbs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks Roots and Ronbo,<br><br>
Actually the my preferred mixture I do up in multi-hour bottles. Every 24 oz bottle has 3 hours of mixture (1,050 calories). I mix 1/3 bottle in my aero bottle with 16 oz water. Voila! I carry two bottles of this on my bike and one sits in my special needs. My days of sherpa-ing drinks around are indeed over. I just get water at aid stations for mixing.<br><br>
I guess this begs another question, how different do people vary plan A to plan B? Do folks go with a different drink type altogether? Just GUs or PowerGels and water? I do know I've run marathons on just PowerGels (usually 8 or 9) and water. Calories, electrolytes, fluids are all met. It's tested. Hmmmmm....this may be my plan B.<br><br>
Thanks again for all the input!<img alt="icon_salut.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/icon_salut.gif">
 

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Gels and Gus killed my stomach, clif blocks and luna moons are MUCH easier to digest. That said, i really only eat solid foods for my ultras. I eat a lot of raw food bars (lara bars and organic raw bars), almonds, and granola. I think if you can digest real food on the bike portion, you should. I only drink water and supplement with electrolyte pills. I have found, through my experience, that sugar is the main culprit of tummy woes during races. Also, the gatorade was causing severe thirst after many hours in a race, especially if it was hot out. Are you pushing your fluids during your races?
 

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I swear by Thermolytes<br><br>
I have had issues in the past and the Thermolytes along with tweaking the nutrition plan in training work really well<br><br>
good luck with it<br><br>
N
 

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I always head out with an A plan and B plan. The A plan is near what you do. My mixture is Carbo Pro, Amino Vital, salt. Mixed for a bottle of 750-900 calories, depending on the day and length. Some days I can stomach the mixture great and others, it just won't go down. Plan B. bananas and gels. The banans you get out on the course and the gels I have in special needs and I carry afew, just incase. Sometimes I have one, just to add extra calories.<br><br>
Cliff makes those Blocks and I have heard good things about them. I haven't tried them. Infinit is another choice. They can make custom for you and you can then mix it to strength.<br><br>
You have a sound plan, but you have said it's not working. Time to make some changes. I would suggest you add a banana or some other solid early. PB+J is easy to carry and most people can tolerate it very easy. Also, you mixture contains zero proteins. When you get to the 10 beats below LT, your body starts to use fatty acids as the primary fuel source. Amino acids and protiens are also beaing used and should be replaced.<br><br>
CS
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
CS,<br><br>
Actually the majority of bike time in my previous IMs were about 15~20 below LT (mine is 161). I try to keep my body calm and in z2 for about 75% of the ride (130-143 bpm) with slight elevations into z3 (144-150), so my pacing relative to the training at the time was not agressive. In retrospect, I had to work abit harder last year due to wind and I believe I started to get behind the power curve, or behind my nutrition strategy. As I was getting behind, that's when the stomach issues began, leading into T2 and into the run. I bonked about 1.5 hours into the run, not wanting to take in anything, being reduced to a walk/run effort.<br><br>
I think next go around I'll try some Suceed drink options or Hammer Perpetuem for the protein, but for now it's too close to change up my plan, other than a half of a banana here or there. I'll try that this weekend.<br><br>
Thanks for your insight!
 
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