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I have a 2+hr long run scheduled for Sun, it is supposed to be cold and windy here when I will get to go, (gotta watch the Pats) possibly single digits. I am going but with some good precautions. For some reason I have a problem running on the TM. I also think that by training in all conditions preps me to race better in all conditions. Got any good tricks. I smear vasoline on my cheeks and nose to prevent wind burn.<br><br>
How cold can you go? For me coldest was last Feb; 8 deg F but windy. Maybe a new record on Sun
 

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Coldest I've run was 15 degrees over the holidays but that was only 40 minutes. The wind chill was single digits and I was miserable.
 

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Single digits is about the worst a Phila winter can throw at me, I think 6 degrees was the coldest I ran. I didn't mind - it was sunny and not that windy. I wore an extra 5 lbs in clothes!
 

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I did a 3hr LR at 10 deg. Neck gaiter, 2 pr gloves, 2 pr socks, tights under running pants, and underwear, hi tec T, hi tec LS, hi tec fleece shirt, and windbreaker. Hat. and...glasses!<br><br>
I also ran the Derry, NH Boston Prep, 16 miler the year it was wicked cold (zero?). Similar dress, one less shirt I think.
 

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Vallesysupper, might be your chance to join the "more miles than degrees" club.<br>
I ran at 4-5 deg.<br>
Although the hardest was a 5K XC race, at 20. Going all out in those temps was almost surreal, i had brain freeze, my teeth were frozen to their roots, i had icycles in my nose...
 

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Mine was single digits and dark. I had to do hill repeats. I had a balaclava, hat and glasses for almost 0% skin exposure.
 

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I think the coldest I ran last winter was just into the negative digits. Long runs, so probably 1.5-2+hrs. Dress right and it isn't too bad. Heavy fleece hat, tri top, 1 or 2 tech shirts, fleece jacket, windbreaker, heavy tights and long socks. It was not uncommon for me to come home and have ice between my fleece jacket and windbreaker. Of course, that's frozen sweat...<br><br>
I must say, my heavy tights were the best purchase last winter. They are Performance. Super heavy weight. I wear them for riding below about 30* and running about 10*. I call these my 'scuba tights' because they are so heavy!<br><br>
Just cold temps didn't really affect my running times. Wind and poor road conditions had more of an effect.<br><br>
I have a 15miler next weekend that I'm really looking forward to!
 

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TPFD has it right. Cover as much skin as possible, especially in the extremities. Dress in layers. Try to start your run into the wind so that you reduce the amount of cold air moving over you as you finish your run sweaty. Personally, I think 1 pair of socks is sufficient. Tights or long undies under running pants is a good idea. Make sure you keep the "boys" protected too.<br><br>
You might also consider running multiple loops, or a route that will allow you to take a shortcut home should conditions get to be too much.
 

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I grew up and went to college in Fairbanks, Alaska. My outside running cut-off point was -30 deg F, which meant that there were about 2 weeks a year that I had to run inside (which was mostly running on the walkways above the stands at the indoor hockey arenas).<br><br>
There's some good info here - <a href="http://www.runningclubnorth.org/lcld_prs.htm" target="_blank">http://www.runningclubnorth.org/lcld_prs.htm</a><br><br>
Most of what I would offer is probably old news. A good base layer to wick moisture away from your body. A good, breathable outer layer to stop wind but not sweat. I liked hoodie sweaters as a middle layer because the hood protected my neck, even though they were typically cotton. A good pair of mittens (keeping the fingers together keeps them warm), along with a thin pair of liner finger gloves in case you have to pull the mittens off. I would ball my hands into a fist inside the mittens when I ran. I used a wool scarf around my mouth and nose and developed a technique of directing my breath up to warm my exposed face. The downside there is that you develop a lot of hoar frost and your eyelashes tend to freeze together (you can dethaw them between your fingers easily). Something to keep the boys warm, be it fancy wind-underwear or an old gaiter stuffed down the front of your pants.<br><br>
When I ran this cold, I actually warmed up pretty quickly. The big concern was always that if you stopped, you cooled off quickly and that can be deadly. Try to run where you have escape routes (a store you can step into). Know how you're going to get in touch with someone to pick you up if you twist an ankle. Run with someone if possible. Keep an eye on each other, especially at the extremes like the nose and ears. Frostbite is not fun. Lots of times body parts will go numb with the cold and you won't realize that you've got frostbite. If you do go numb, warming up will hurt like hell.<br><br>
With the right prep, you can run in almost any temp. Attitude (and a good sense of when to play it safe) are a big part of it. And, as always, this is supposed to be fun. If you're miserable in the cold, use the dreadmill or find an indoor track.<br><br>
Mike
 

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I'm in the same boat as Mike. I used to live in Saskatchewan - we'd run outside until it was about -25/-30 Celsius. I once ran for an hour and a half at -40 Celsius, that was pretty cold. We had a 20 mile Long Run planned one weekend, but it was about -30 plus windchill, so we did the run on a 200 meter indoor track. That was pretty brutal.<br>
Advice for running in the cold? Make sure you don't overdress. Keeping your extremities warm is really important, and they should be protected from the wind as well as the cold. Oh, and don't stick your tongue out ever - it will touch the metal on your zipper and stay there. That's very unpleasant.<br><br>
Happy trails.
 

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1<br><br>
Not to get too graphic, but I did a run in freezing rain and strong winds, last winter. I had icicles forming on the exposed hair on my legs and on my cap. After the ten miles was up, I felt relatively warm in all areas except for "the boy" area. I wore my regular running shorts and the skimpy liner did nothing for the tip of my boy. Luckily, the area only got extremely numb, not frostbitten. The warm shower afterwards was an experience...Ouch!
 

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I ran this morning at -15 Celsius, so around 5 F I think? No wind today though, otherwise I probably would have stayed in.<br><br>
I think my coldest has been around -20C, which I think is somewhere just a few degrees below zero on the F scale.<br><br>
I have a great collection of cold weather gear because unless it is extremely cold, windy, or icy I am not getting on the treadmill.
 

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I did a 20k run a month or so ago at about -4F. It was at night too. It wasn't all that fun, but I could handle colder, I think. I was fine for warmth, but my face was damn cold. This is my first winter for running outside so I'm only getting started. <img alt="biggrin.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/biggrin.gif">
 

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If you are going to plant water, don't... instead, plant something like Gatorade that has sugar in it. The sugar content staves off freezing by a few degrees. So my tips are, make your own Gatorade with very, very hot water (running hot from fawcet is okay). Do not use a bike water bottle. Air can get in there. And it will freeze. Use a screw top regular water bottle or even and old Gatorade bottle. After you pour in the hot Gatorade, wrap bottle in a towel and stuff towel into a few plastic baggies and tie tight.<br><br>
Plant Gatorade toward night time the night before a morning long run. This is good over night down to at least 15F, and maybe more. I've gotten away with down to 10, but be sure to plant well, like out of wind and maybe near a building for even more heat. Inside a dumpster would work, too!<br><br>
That morning, when you go to your planted Gatorade, open it up and very quickly get down as much as you can. Do not open and let sit. It will freeze before your eyes. I kid you not. If it gets too chunky with ice, keep squeezing bottle to break ice, fill water bottles on your hydration belt, and get out of there before someone sees you. They may think you're crazy.<br><br>
Only other tip is that mittens are much better than gloves.
 

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If you look at the physics of this, the air in the bottle is not significant. The starting point of the water temperature is only significant if you can provide sufficient insulation to delay the drop in temperature. What is <i>most</i> significant is the concentration of sugar (or salt) in the water. Either causes a phenomenon know as "<a href="http://dl.clackamas.edu/ch105-03/freezing.htm" target="_blank">freezing point depression</a>". This same phenomenon is why you add salt to the ice when using a home ice cream maker. The result is that the stronger you make your Gatorade, the colder it can get before it freezes.
 

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Yeah....<br>
but doesn't a lower freezing point of stronger gatorade then INCREASE the severity of the brain freeze you get from drinking it too quickly?<br><br>
or, is it that you get the brain freeze MORE quickly than you would than if you drank normal strength gatorade?<br><br>
just askin' <img alt="wink.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/wink.gif">
 
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