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<span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';"><span style="font-size:medium;">Just trying to stimulate some discussion: I’m kind of a big (tall) guy, 217 lbs. I run like a tractor-trailer in that I’m a hostage to gravity. I get passed a lot on the uphills; but I do my share of passing on the downgrades. Anyone else have the same difficulty with hills?</span></span>
 

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I am currently...6 ft 3in about 250+ and run the hills like a Mad man on the way up!!!!.. however I almost walk going downhill so completely opposite of you... my knees and legs get the shit kicked out of them on the way down if I run... On the way up it is like running on clouds!
 

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Hills kick my butt too. The worse the grade the worse the butt kicking, but like I said in my race report, I think that helps my pace on a flat course. The top of my thighs feel the fatigue and it feels like I'm hauling a ton of weight (which I am). On my long run, from the 2.25 mark all the way to the 3.5 mark its a steady uphill with a range of grades, then I turn around and I do the same thing coming down which is like my little reward for making it because coming down is a breeze.<br>
I always start to think about how horrible it would have been if I hadn't lost 45 lbs.. Then I think how great it will be when I lose another 30! There are some really severe hills here in WV and once I feel that I've been running long enough I'm going to start adding in some harder hill work.<br><br>
There's a 15 mile race here on Labor Day which is mostly flat but they have this KILLER hill at the end. Steep as hell up and steep as hell down. I really want to do that run but I'm scared to death of that stinkin' hill! I'll just have to train for it. I'll have a few HM's under my belt by June (hopefully) so I'll have time to do some hill work before that race.<br><br><br>
Jess
 

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It takes a little work to learn how to accelerate up a hill, but no amount of work will help with downhilling if old wore out knees are the problem.
 

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I've got hill skills. I love running on them, or at least what they do for my running. I run on them very differently depending on if I'm training or racing.<br><br>
On an average I run them once per week, either repeats or a hilly course. I found an awesome course for my long runs that has virtually no flat spots and one of the climbs (the turnaround for an 18 mile run) is a mile long.<br><br>
When I hit a hill in training, I attack it with a little fervor. This means that I either keep my pace steady or do a bit of a pickup. I ease up as I crest the hill and just take it easy on the downside.<br><br>
Racing is different. When I run hills in a race I keep my effort steady for the climb. Obviously this translates to a reduction in pace. Just before I crest the hill, I'll throw a surge in and keep the hammer down until I level out. Virtually 100% of the time, I'll pass those that passed me on the uphill and will have expended less effort in the process.
 

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Last summer I peeled 1:00 off my 5k times by running Mountain Races at 9-12 min pace. It blew my mind, no speedwork. If it weren't for those races, I don't think I'd have sought out multi-mile hills by choice <img alt="confused.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/confused.gif"> Strangely, no one I reccommend this to rushes out to find Mountains to run. There's always the view at the top, or some sense of dominating the landscape before you which is the motivating factor to do it.
 

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Agreed! I love mountain running... it's all I do anymore.<br><br>
For anyone looking for a good mountain run, the Pikes Peak Marathon is a really good one, but it only has one hill on the course. <img alt="biggrin.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/biggrin.gif">
 
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