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In the past I have had mild sodium issues during carbo loading and on long runs, like puffy fingers and feet/ankles. I want to experiment with taking it on my training long runs. I know there's what? S-tabs, e-caps, etc. What's the difference between products, and any other recommendations for trying some electrolyte tweaking out?
 

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Hammer electrolytes - "E-caps" have relatively low sodium per capsule. That means you have to take quite a few for it to be useful. I think a lot of people will take 400-1000 mg/hour.<br><br>
S! caps, lava salts, and several other brands have more sodium. Lots of people here will tell you to go with the S! caps. Now that Zombie no longer carries them, you pretty much have to mail order them from Karl King, but I've had no trouble and they're reasonably priced.<br><br>
Keep in mind that there is no magic formula. As the temperature changes or you work harder, your sweat rate changes dramatically and you need to try to adjust your intake to match. Last year I ran Boston, and they were serving GEF and it wasn't hot, so I took no extra sodium. But at Richmond, it was pretty hot and they served Poweraide which is notoriously low in sodium. I ran out of caps and crashed.<br><br>
The other thing to think about is that the classic "she died" scenario is for someone to finish a race and start drinking water. I've had a number of friends get into trouble after finishing, and again, going back to Richmond last year they had NOTHING with sodium in it at the finish. I've learned to shoot for having at least 5 gm eq sodium left in my pockets when I finish, not only for myself but so I can help out any friends who start to look green.<br><br>
The other project I'm working on is to try to understand the maximum rate that I can take in sodium and fluids. When trail races have gotten hot, I've always just chosen to slow down to just below the threshold of sweating profusely. That way, I can stay in my comfort zone of how fast it all goes in. But even at 80F, that's a REALLY slow pace for me. Sooner or later I need to learn how to notch it up a little.<br><br>
I've even thought about 2 hr wintertime TM workouts while wearing 27 layers of clothing to experiment with this. Since you live in a tropical paradise, it should be easier for you. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.kickrunners.com/forum/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Smile">
 

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sorry if this is a stupid question, but what happens when you overload on that? Do you crash? slow down? upset stomach? any signs you should pay attention to that you are taking too much?
 

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Oh, one more thing, a real cautionary tale. I don't know if you remember hearing about the trouble that Kate, my bestest buddy (and "KateMD" over in CR-ultra) got into at Waldo, but it's a real reminder for all of us. That race has a monster climb up Maiden Peak going from 4500 to 7800 ft between miles 49 and 52. A very steep grade and somewhat thinner air forces you to just stare at the trail in front of you and grind it out at a trudge. During that climb, Kate forgot to drink and take in enough sodium - being demoralized may have been a factor too. I saw her a little later and I was frankly scared to death for her. By mile 59 she was unable to continue and ended up being the subject of a SAR operation. All turned out OK, but it was a reminder that once we get all this stuff dialled in, we need to drive it into our skulls to DO IT ALWAYS even when there are a bazillion distractions.
 

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Wouldn't it be nice if there was a simple formula? Take x number of capsules, or drinks, and your electrolyte issues are solved? I wish.<br><br>
Hippo stated it well. Its an ongoing process that requires monitoring. Watching for puffy hands is a typical sign of low electrolytes. Not always, but typically.<br><br>
Admittedly, I've never consumed so much sodium until I became a marathon and ultramarathon runner. I was raised on a low-sodium diet. Nowadays, I freely grab the salt shaker, eat potato chips and pretzels, and drink gatorade (or the like electrolyte drink) all throughout the week. Know that there's more ways to intake electrolytes other than by beverage or capsule.<br><br>
I aim to go into a long run, or marathon, with my tanks topped off. Meaning: Well hydrated, salt added to food, and likely a 20-32 oz of Gatorade at sometime in the 6 hours prior to said run.<br><br>
During a run I don't use Gatorade (and the like beverages.) Over time, the sugar causes stomach distress.<br><br>
During the run, replacing electrolytes depends on the sweat rate. Temperature and humidity plays a factor. I am a fan of S-caps, simply because it takes less S-caps than E-caps. Both are effective. Also, with capsules, it eliminates the need for Gatorade, or the beverage of choice at the race. A frustrating fact of using the races's beverage is that one never knows the consistency at which the beverage will be mixed at each water station.<br><br>
During runs, using caps have eliminated my problems with (and need for) gatorade (and the like) beverages.<br><br>
Another aspect of gatorade (or the like beverages) provided on course, is that this product contains simple sugars. Taken over time, these sugars are known to cause gastric distress. Using caps have allowed me to avoid using gatorade altogether, and therefore avoid stomach issues. No worries about a sugar rush, since the run/race will end soon. If anything, I use Gatorade before and after running, or only during the last 30 minutes of a run.<br><br>
You have to experiment and take notes. The good news is that a little prevention goes a long way. Once you figure out what works for you, taking care of your electrolytes becomes easier to apply again and again. I imagine if you add a little salt to your diet, and perhaps try an electrolyte replacement product, that you will find the formula that works for you.<br><br>
As always, water is the catalyst. All the electrolytes in the world do no good if the liquid is not there to absorb.<br><br>
Good luck experimenting.
 

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SGH, as you know, I've been struggling with cramps on longer runs and lately that hasn't been a problem. Yesterday, after my longer run, my fingers were somewhat swollen, but not too bad.<br><br>
Like roots, I didn't usually eat much extra sodium in my diet. The most was from soup in a can on occasion. Now, I've been adding salt to my foods more often than not, and thinking about what I'm eating a few days before a longer run. So, while I am not quite there with managing my electrolytes, I think I'm doing better than before.<br><br>
I started using Nuun electrolyte tabs (you put them in water, and they bubble to dissolve nicely) because they have no sugar and 1 tab makes 16 oz. The nice thing is the resulting fluid is not sweet and actually rather refreshing when I drink it.<br><br>
Yesterday I consumed about 10 oz during my 14 mile run, and drank a nice amount after. I don't know the ratio of sodium and other electrolytes in the Nuun tabs, but their website is <a href="http://www.nuun.com" target="_blank">www.nuun.com</a>. I've really liked it. I've tried the Lemon and the Tri-berry. The lemon may be called Citrus, I can't remember.
 

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i take 1 succeed capsule every 30 minutes, 1 serving of clif blocks every half hour and water. I gave up on sports drink. I was having too many issues with it or whatever the race was serving. blech.
 
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