Kick Runners banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,893 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
For those who are looking for the Thor's post a few weeks ago (you, zoj!), here it is


For Hammy Attachment issues, these exercises will help strengthen the area, but please note that it is not a quick fix, and you will likely get worse before you get better (that's just how strengthening exercises work anyway):
1) Dead Lifts - but follow form here (very important), straight but soft knees very key; you're not bending at the knees
YOU TUBE

2) Back Extensions (lock knees, pull back, make sure to feel through to your lower glutes -- if you do not, you're doing them wrong or with not enough weight, slow motions better)
3) Step Ups - step up to bench, drive from heel as you step up, start with light weights. Form: stand in front of bench with feet together and straight (key), step up right foot on bench (arms by your side holding weights) so that full foot is on bench, drive up with heel, okay to push off with left foot, then bring left foot next to right on bench, both should be straight, then right foot down, then left foot down, then without taking other steps or corrections, back up with right foot. So it is right up first, right down first. Switch sides to left.

An example workout (3 x per week):
WU - Side lunges, 20 each side (work up to 50 after a few weeks)
Dead Lift - 15 x 20 lbs (2 x 20 lb dumbbells, one in each hand)
Back Extension - 15 x 80 lbs (80 lb total on machine)
Step Ups - 12 x 15 lbs (24 total step ups with right and left foot, starting with 2 x 15 lb dumbbells, one in each hand)
Dead Lift - 15 x 20 lbs
Back Extension - 15 x 80 lbs
Step Ups - 12 x 15 lbs (24 in total with right and left)
Dead Lift - 15 x 25 lbs
Back Extension - 15 x 90 lbs
Step Ups - 12 x 20 lbs (24 in total with right and left)

Ramp up weight as needed and reps to at most 20. You will notice a difference in a lot of ways, especially in the hammy attachment being stronger, in 4 weeks if you do 3 x per week and try to feel what you should feel and don't be shy with the weight.

This is a great start. If you do this an like it and want more, ask. I have several more exercises to add to this that target the glutes and help with hammy attachments.
Me...

Walk.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,312 Posts
You may also want to consider the hamstring curl, either prone or seated.
Apparently, I have moved past the usefulness of the single leg deadlift.
A different exercise was needed in order to address my current range of motion weakness.
Sigh.

Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,911 Posts
Thanks!!! lol

So Thor - what is a good substitute for back extensions? Can't do those due to my back...
Sorry I missed this...

This is a great question, and I do not know the answer. Here's the problem of not being able to do the back extensions: When a back extension is done properly specifically for upper hamstring and glute issues, you are actually working the full range of hamstring attachment, glute, and through the back, as if it were a board, or thought another way, all of those muscles working (tensing) together. And that is important. So you could double up on the dead lifts as long as you get form right. You pretty much know you're getting form right when you feel the hamstring attachment, through the glutes, being worked. Of course, you'll feel it on just one side, the week one, but try to stretch it through this exercise AND feel both sides. Another exercise would be the Smith machine, with bar at back, because that would isolate the glute/hammy attachment. Or focus on the other ones. Back extension is bigger than most people realize because of how the back supports the full kinetic chain. Doing it, and feeling what you're supposed to feel, shows you exactly this.

The rule of thumb for back extensions done this way (see above) is that performance athletes should be able to do 100% to 150% of body weight. For the general public, 60% of body weight is fine. Most mid to back of pack runners who do nothing but run, they are probably closer to 60%. But know that this is just one of several metrics used to comprise the whole of an athlete, if you will.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,911 Posts
If the above is too advanced, I would highly recommend starting a bit slower by doing side lunges, to each side, and step ups without weights, and full body squats without weight. You can start doing 10 each x 3. But work up to being able to do 50 at a shot of each. It's a lot, but that is where the strength comes in. I routinely do 100 full body squats to warm up before many of my PT workouts. I don't do the side lungs too much anymore, but that's only because I've graduated to so much more. But you should be able to get to 25 on each side. I was up to 50 with weight. Just showing you the range. But when you do them for duration, you will notice the strength.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top