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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How much of an effect does it really have?<br><br>
I am tossing around the idea of running a HM in Tahoe in late September. However, I am little worried about it because I currently run at sea level. I dont really see a drastic decrease in performance when I go to my parents house (~4000ft), but I know Tahoe is at ~6000ft. It will be only about a month before my 1st marathon, so I don't want to push it too much, but I do think it would be fun. I wouldn't push it, I would just use it as a fun training run. Should I do it? Or is the elevation going to kill me?<img alt="confused.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/confused.gif">
 

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I dont know the answer to your question, but I am considering doing the 10k there at the same time! If so, we could meet up somewhere!<br><br>
Come on up and do it! <img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif">
 

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You should do it!<br><br>
Sierra was thinking of running one of the races. I'm thinking about the Triple this year.<br><br>
My experience with altitude is that if you make small allowances it's way easier than you might think. Just be aware that you'll have to slow everything down by 5-10% and adjust your expectations accordingly.<br><br>
The only real risk is that you'll try to go at nearly normal pace. Since it takes a few minutes for your lungs to start to cash the checks your legs write, if you don't ease into it gradually you can get a bit surprised and out of breath. But in a half marathon you have plenty of time to ease into pace the first couple of miles.<br><br>
The big surprise I've had (and others report too) about altitude is that it is EASIER than you expect. Your lungs will work hard, and force you to go slower. But your legs and everything don't know about altitude, just that they are running slower. You may feel less tired after than doing the same race at sea level.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It was actually your PM that made me think of this to bring up in here in the first place. I was going to respond that I was planning on running this race and then I started getting scared of the race. <img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif">
 

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Dont be scared! If you come and do I will come and cheer you on! <img alt="biggrin.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/biggrin.gif"><br><br>
Hey, you cant beat the scenery either! <img alt="hello2.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/hello2.gif">
 

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I'll dare you both!<br><br>
I'm still not sure about going, but if either of you will run the Triple with me. I'll figure out how to come.<br><br>
But the problem with that race is that you have to start Thursday morning. So it isn't just a weekend thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
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The triple?? Are you crazy? Iam worried about dying in the half, for petes sake. <img alt="biggrin.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/biggrin.gif">
 

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wait a minute hippo, isnt the triple 3 marathons on 3 days???<img alt="shock.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/shock.gif"><br><br>
Ummm, I am just getting started running again after almost 3 years on the injured list! I'll be lucky to do the 10k!!!<br><br>
But I can be there with whatever you need on all three days if you do it! <img alt="biggrin.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/biggrin.gif">
 

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There is supposed to be a new option this year that might make the triple easier.<br><br>
On the 3rd day you run 72 miles. Since you have to run more slowly for this, it might not be as hard.<br><br>
Me, if I do it, would just be the regular thing. Got to keep up with Mahoneys, Meissners, Bartons, and all the other regular joes going down to run.<br><br>
Plus, it's THREE TIMES THE PARTAY!!!
 

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I'll hold your beer for ya at the finish line! <img alt="biggrin.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/biggrin.gif">
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
So will I, but since the half doesnt start until 10:30 and I am slow...you may actually reach the finish before me. In that case I expect a Hippo holding a beer for me. <img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif">
 

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I know that altitude sickness doesn't really start until about 4000m. Other than that good luck.
 

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Oooo, wait, hold on. There are various kinds of "altitude sickness", but usually we're talking about the "acute mountain sickness" kind. 4000m is 13,000+ feet. AMS can start closer to 6,000 feet.<br><br>
The issue is that it affects different people differently... and at different times. Some people will feel the onset (headache, namely) at slightly lower altitudes. Some people can go much higher. I have no trouble at all at 5,000 ft, though I am somewhat slower in races. At 6000, I'm breathing a bit harder. At 8000, a lot harder.<br><br>
Altitude sickness effects got me during the Leadville Marathon... which is 10,000-12,500 ft. Headaches, irritability, disorientation, big time nausea, muscle pain. It was awful.<br><br>
6000 feet really is the grey area for a sea level type. It may or may not affect you. If it does, it'll probably be harder to breathe and maybe a headache. Don't worry so much about edema or completely gorking out.<br><br>
Two key points:<br><br>
1. Stay hydrated. Drink more than you are used to drinking. If you dehydrate, even a little bit, it'll make things a lot worse.<br><br>
2. Spend as little time as possible in the area before the race. Altitude sickness takes "awhile" (12 hours? a day?) to show up. If you do the race before then, it may not punch you as hard. Until afterwards.
 

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Hippo that's why you have your name isn't it? You're a freakin' animal. 3 'thons in 3 days...you turning into srlopez or something? <img alt="wink.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/wink.gif">
 

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Oh ya back on topic...MG it sounds like it won't be too extreme, especially if you're not "racing" it and you'd get to meet up with some cool dudes.
 

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So my two cents on this... as a current colorado resident...<br><br>
Altitude does make a difference, but if you allow for it (aka, go out easy) you will do fine. I run here all the time. When I go home to KS, about 3000 feet lower, I run a 5K about 4-5 minutes faster. And when I go up to the mountains to run (10-11K feet) I run it slower. But when I'm up there I drink lots of water and run slower. As long as you aren't expecting a PR, you'll do great!<br><br>
The big thing we've noticed with people who come to visit is that they can get pretty easily dehydrated becasue it gets drier the higher you go. I'm not sure how much of a concern that will be for Tahoe, but keep an eye on your fluid intake.<br><br>
The first time I came out to CO to go camping (when I lived in KS) I got sick. I didn't drink enough and got very sick. I have since learned my lesson!
 

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Don't plan on a PR.<br>
Drink water - that helps you adjust to the altitude.<br>
Wear chapstick.<br>
Wear sunblock ( you burn at a higher rate for every 1000ft above sea level).<br>
If you do the right training and you are fit - then you will be OK. Someone who only trains to "finish" or goes after an ambitious PR would run into trouble.<br>
You'll feel worse after the race than you normally would - the biggest problem of altitude is how long it takes you to recover.<br>
Don't freak out if you feel like crap at first. That is normal. It happens to everyone that comes to altitude from sea level. Just relax and work through it.<br>
A 5k or 10k would be worse - the longer distance might not be as bad. That's what people tell me anyway. Those who come and do track workouts have a tougher time with the speed stuff than when they do their long runs.<br><br>
PS - I live at 6800 feet above sea level.
 

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I am planning on a mountainous race at the end of the summer. I am getting there 4 days prior to race day, should that be enough time to acclimate? Getting there Tues, race is Sat.
 

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<b>merigayle<br>
I am planning on a mountainous race at the end of the summer. I am getting there 4 days prior to race day, should that be enough time to acclimate? Getting there Tues, race is Sat.</b><br><br>
If you can get away from work then leaving and arriving a week in advance would help some. Otherwise, the theory goes, you're better off getting there just before the race. You kind of hit rock bottom after 2-4 days, and then the acclimation gets better. A lot depends on how high and how long your race is. Hills are tough at altitude, especially when you haven't adapted.
 

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hmmmm. the elevation does not look that bad. 10,000 feet? is that high? I do not want to spend the bulk of our trip after i run my race, my legs will be too tired for me to do anything fun <img alt="sad.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/sad.gif">
 
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