Runners Forum - Kick Runners banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
722 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Every time I try to invent a new soup, it all goes horribly, horribly wrong. I'm trying to find a healthy replacement for ramen noodles & ideally replicate the light, clear broth found in certain kinds of chinese soups, e.g. wonton, but I can't seem to identify the secret ingredient. Anybody know what it is? or have any other ideas for one-serving soups?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,043 Posts
I can't think of the secret ingredient.<br><br>
But I like to steam a pile of veggies and pour chicken broth with a spoonful of miso paste over it all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,043 Posts
I'm back.<br><br>
I love Allrecipes.com. Check out this wonton soup recipe. I don't see anything secret, but I get what you're saying. Now this is gonna bug me!<br><br><a href="http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Wonton-Soup/Detail.aspx" target="_blank">http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Wonton-Soup/Detail.aspx</a><br><br>
This website makes me hungry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,043 Posts
From about.com:<br>
--------------<br>
It's all in the stock...<br>
As with French cuisine, the secret of a good Chinese soup lies in the stock. What is stock? Basically, it's a liquid broth in which meat, bones, and sometimes vegetables have been simmered over a long period of time, imparting their flavor to the heated broth. Chicken is the meat of choice for preparing Chinese stock, <b>although pork is also used,</b> <b>particularly in addition to chicken</b>. (Beef is thought to add too strong a flavor). The Chinese place such importance on their stock that they have two categories.<br><br>
A primary or first class chicken stock is made by simmering a whole chicken, while a second class stock uses only the bones. There is also gourmet stock, a truly superior broth made with chicken, pork ribs and other pork bones, ham, and sometimes duck. It is used to create banquet dishes such as Shark's Fin soup.<br><br>
Besides not using beef, Chinese stock also differs from French stock (known as fonds de cuisine) in the <b>lack of spices</b>. While a recipe for French chicken stock might call for a pinch of tyme or a few garlic cloves, the Chinese believe spicing masks the flavor of the chicken or pork. Seasonings are added later, depending on what the individual recipe calls for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
722 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
well thanks buxtehude. I actually do have a little miso paste on hand, so maybe I'll try that next time. I love allrecipes too, but this time they just aren't coming through for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,043 Posts
I've been looking at the chocolate cake recipes at allrecipes.com all day today.<br><img alt="blush.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/blush.gif"><br><br>
Hmm. Maybe I'm hungry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,034 Posts
1 bag of cheese tortellini<br>
8 c chicken stock<br>
1 head of escarole, chopped<br>
black pepper<br>
grated parmesan<br><br>
bring the stock to a boil, and add the tortellini and escarole. reduce to a simmer, and heat until the tortellini are cooked. season with pepper to taste, and serve with parmesan.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
722 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
tortellini! of course! tortellini is great in soup. brilliant.<br><br>
buxtehude - there is a green tea cake on allrecipes i'm going to try as soon as a cakeworthy occassion comes up. That site is like cake porn.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,290 Posts
saute some onions or leeks in a pot<br>
add 1-2 containers of mushroom broth<br>
add a mix of sliced mushrooms (Trader Joes used to sell a bag of frozen mixed mushrooms that was perfect for this) shitake, enoki, button, baby bellas, oysters, etc.<br><br>
add a noodle of your choice (udon, somen, soba).<br><br>
season with shoyu to taste.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,043 Posts
I always wondered what shoyu was.<br><br>
I recently read that it's basically Japanese soy sauce.<br><br>
(correct me if I'm wrong, anyone)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
757 Posts
Chopped ginger is never cooked long enough to release the flavor in homemade soups. I started using ground ginger, it works much better and you just keep adding until it is just the way you want it. I think it also helps never to add salt until the soup is done. Larry
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,290 Posts
yes, shoyu is japanese soy sauce. mushroom broth? there is usually only one brand at the store as far as i remember. It comes in a box. TJs may sell a store brand, but it has been a while.<br><br>
RunstheBitterroot- do you saute the ginger before adding the broth to your soup? I use a microplane grater for my ginger and it works very well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
757 Posts
Merigayle, no I don't sautee the ginger prior to putting it in the soup. I am sure that would help. Still it is more convienient to use the ground ginger. Thanks, Larry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,662 Posts
Paula Deen made a cold fruit soup that looked easy and easy for one.<br><br>
Fresh fruit, o.j. water, maybe another fruit juice.<br>
She simmered then until soft (10 min.)<br>
Then she blended it until smooth<br>
Then she fridge/freeze 'd it until cold.<br>
Voila, cold fruit soup
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,662 Posts
I make lots of good scratch soups but making a single serving would not be worth it. Those deli containers (they will more often than not just give them to you) make great portioners and most soups freeze well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,636 Posts
Into the crockpot:<br><br>
chopped onion, garlic, carrots, red peppers<br>
1 can diced tomatoes, with juice<br>
vegetable broth, non-veg folks can use chicken broth (about 2 cans)<br>
diced smoked turkey sausage (or you can leave out to make veg, it's good without too)<br>
8 oz (about half a bag) lentils, rinsed<br>
bay leaf, thyme, rosemary, cumin, salt, pepper and a sprinkle of cayenne<br>
you can also add barley to this if you want<br><br>
cook on low 6-7 hours<br>
YUM
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top