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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK kids - looking for a little guidance here. TNF Bear Mtn. will be my first non-loop ultra. There's a drop bag option, but I have <b>no</b> idea what to put in it!<br><br>
What do you generally put in yours? I know it's only a 50K that I'm running, but I figured I should take advantage of the option, just in case...
 

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That's what I like to see. A runner who prepares for the worst. Even if it doesn't materialize.<br><br>
Inside your waterproof duffle/stuff sack, etc.<br>
Get yourself 2-3 quart size ziploc bags. A great barrier against moisture.<br><br>
1 pair trail socks<br>
1 light rain coat<br>
1 small towel<br>
1 black garbage bag - beats sitting on wet ground if you don't have a seat and can also be used as a wind breaker or rain barrier.<br>
First Aid: blister patches, vaseline/body glide, a few extra S-caps<br>
Maybe a few of your favorite training treats<br><br>
Generally you may not need this stuff, but in my opinion it is better to be safe then sorry.<br><br>
Good luck! cr
 

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That's a great list. I try to keep anything in there that I would like if I could carry EVERYTHING I wanted while running, but that I don't carry because I think I can get along without it.<br><br>
I also keep a spare pair of shoes as well as some warmer clothing.<br><br>
Also, keep in mind that you could set yourself up with a quick transition if you can duplicate your race needs. For example, you could keep a spare gu flask in your bag so when you are low on your initial one, then you could just switch out for the full one instead of taking the time to fill it. Another example is if you had two running packs. Set up your initial bag to run out of supplies (or go low) by the time you get to the drop bag. Once you get there, just switch to your other full bag. This would probably be ideal if you had a crew to refill your other pack while not using it.<br><br>
Chris
 

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One of the best uses I've seen for a drop bag is to switch hydration solutions in the middle of a race. Some races have a single section that is longer/slower/hotter than the rest of the race. Adding a handheld or going to a big hydration pack mid race can be a big advantage.<br><br>
This can also be something as simple as going from a single handheld in the morning when it's cool to something bigger in the heat of the day.
 

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I like to overprepare. I usually use a backpack for a drop bag. In the main section i put extra clothes and a change of shoes and socks. Also, depending on the forecast i may include a windbreaker, etc. In the front pouch i usually stuff it with extra food items to restock with. In the top pouch i usually put extra electrolyte tablets, and any first aid stuffs that i may need- ginger, advil, pepto, immodium, aspercreme, blister kit, etc. I also keep a spare pair of glasses in there. 99% of the time i rarely need anything from my bag, but i would rather have it than not. i have very specific nutritional needs that are not met by race food, so the most important thing for me, is my food! <img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif"> Depending on the race, the temperature, and their drop bag policy, i may also have a small 6-pack cooler bag which i put in my drink and food if it is going to be very hot out.
 

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For me, food is the biggie. There is always a spare pair of socks in there, a dry shirt, maybe even shorts if I've started the race in tights, vaseline, and bandaids. But the goodies are the food. Energy drinks, powerbars, fig newtons, gel/bloks, whatever. Give yourself a treat, like really good cookie or one of those Starbucks DoubleShot drinks and it will be like a little oasis waiting for you at the aid station.<br><br>
If the weather is nasty, two or three pairs of everything might be called for. Double bag it, too, because Murphy's Law says your dry clothes will be waiting for you underneath a dripping tree, or next to the aid tent where the rain washes in a small torrent directly down onto your bag.
 

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I'm of the mind you go minimal. I only want what I exactly need. After being on the trail, after finding some kind of rhythm, I find aid stations to be a sensory overload with their controlled chaos. I want to reach into my bag, grab what I need, and get out of there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you all for the great ideas...I've got a much better idea now of how to go about planning for it.<br><br>
Thanks again!
 

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While they don't lose bags very often, don't put anything in the bag that you absolutely need to survive the race. A nice ugly colored drop bag will stand out and be easy to find.<br><br>
Umpteen years ago at the Boston start I put my stuff in the baggage bus with the other thousand yellow bags they gave out that year, while my friend used a pink pillow case. I thought he was being cute until I went to get my bag at the end of race on a cold blustery day. It took 5 seconds to locate the pink pillowcase and about 15 minutes to find mine.
 

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We did a podcast on drop bags: <a href="http://www.trailsandtribulations.com" target="_blank">www.trailsandtribulations.com</a>
 
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