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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have just started running again after a very long lay off due to injury. Been at it now for about 5 weeks again. I am just now up to 5 miles at a time, and that includes a few short walk breaks. (I know, I am in bad shape again)<br><br>
Anyway, I signed up for the Tahoe 10k on Sept 29. Its a 99% downhill race.<br><br>
A bit of history, I first injured my achilles tendon 3.5 years ago running too many hills. Its just now back to where I can run again due to ART treatment.<br><br>
My dilemma is that I have been doing all of my running on a treadmill. Consequently, no training for the downhills of this race. (It will also be my first race ever)<br><br>
I have 10 weeks before the race. Up to now I have been concentrating on just getting some mileage back. I finally hit 5 miles last night.<br><br>
So, when do I start doing some downhill training? And how often and how much? I am a bit afraid of it to be honest, because thats what caused my initial injury. But I understand that I do need to do some training on it or I will definitely re-injure it in the race.<br><br>
So, bottom line, when to start downhill training and how much and how often?<br><br>
Any suggestions would be very much appreciated! <img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif">
 

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The first thing to do is to get off the treadmill.<br>
Given what you have told us I would just be concentrating gradually building up your mileage on similar surfaces that you will be running your 10km. race and looking for some undulating course with equal amounts of both up and down.<br>
Frankly, (supra-maximal sprints) running sessions of downhills can very easily cause more injuries than they are worth. I do prescribe them during track season but to only the very experienced athletes.<br><br>
Incidentally it's up hill running that loads up your achilles, running down hill there is little pressure. You may like to consider doing some resistance work for your Quads, they are really going to take a pounding running downhill for so long.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks so much for the info. I appreciate it.<br><br>
I'll put it to use! <img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif">
 

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well, running down hill is good practice <img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif"><br>
Every so often, prior to mountainous race, coach gives me a workout which includes powerhiking up, runnng down large hills. The thing about downhill running is that it can kill your quads, especially if you are not used to it and "put the brakes on" while you go downhill.<br><br>
Is it a gradual downhill or pretty steep? If you live near the race, then definitely try to run the course!<br>
You need to not run all your runs on the treadmill as running on the treadmill is VERY different than outside. You should start trying to run outside 1-2 times a week, ASAP. I have seen many of runners who NEVER ran outside have issues when they tried to run outside.
 

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I run hills pretty much every day. I think the most important thing is correct running form. I try to run dowhill with that feeling that I'm sucking my ass in under my hips, and I stick my chest outwards a bit. I also try to land as flat footed as possible, with a slight bend in my knee so as to soften the footfall. All of this is made easier when running faster rather than slower. 10k pace should be relatively easy to do it.
 

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As I know it there are two main techniques, you need to select which one depending on how steep the hill (can REALLY be an issue when descending 800m on the mountains <img alt="razz.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/razz.gif"> ) is and how fast you want to go.<br><br>
1) Short steps, stay upright keep your speed slow and controlled, less impact.<br><br>
2) Lean forward and allow gravity to help you accelerate, long strides and try to "flow" over the terrain reducing impact.<br><br>
HEALTH WARNING do not try 2) on this:<br><br><img alt="" src="http://www.caingram.info/Uk/Pix/Scafell-pike.jpg" style="border:0px solid;"><br><br>
It gets VERY scary <img alt="" src="http://bestsmileys.com/scared/3.gif" style="border:0px solid;">
 

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I sometimes run a hill near Kamloops that is over 4 km long with about 1500 vertical feet of rise. It takes me 35 to 40 min to ascend, and 23 to 25 min to descend. My quads are usually trashed for a week or so afterwards. I use description #2 except for one or two steep sections.<br><br>
Around the minesite I have two or three longish (1 km) hills with 60 to 90 meters of vertical. I normally run them at a relaxed pace. Upwards I practice flicking my ankles and lifting my knees, and landing flat footed. Downwards I practice as per description #1 at a controlled pace. Pace can vary quite a bit, but I always try for control.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Its the last 6.2 miles of the marathon route. This shows the entire thing and the 10k starts at 6800 ft and ends about 400 ft lower. (the arrow at the right shows the start of the 10k) It seems pretty steep for the first couple of miles, then kinda levels out. Its not a road that I can actually run on, no shoulder and lots of traffic. In reality, it is pretty steep with switchbacks getting down to lake level.<br><br>
This is the road. The race starts at the far end of Emerald Bay and this shows most of the steep parts.<br><br>
I hope I havent bit off more than I can chew!<br><br>
Thanks for all the great advice everyone! I appreciate it! <img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif"><br><br><img alt="" src="http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a251/carla513/2lakeridge.jpg" style="border:0px solid;"><br><br><img alt="" src="http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a251/carla513/Marathon_profile.jpg" style="border:0px solid;">
 

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That is a nasty looking first couple of miles! Unless you're looking for a PB I suggest taking it easy for that section and then picking it up when you hit the flat area.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
well, its my first race ever, so matter what happens it will be a PB! <img alt="biggrin.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/biggrin.gif"><br><br>
And yeah, I plan on taking it REAL easy! But now you can see why I am a bit nervous about it!<br><br>
Pretty though huh! <img alt="biggrin.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/biggrin.gif">
 

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Yes, it's very pretty and it reminds me a lot of my 4k hill near Kamloops, although that one is gravel.<br><br>
Don't forget to smile when you cross the finish line if they are taking photos.
 
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