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<p>I'm new here, so I hope this is the correct forum for this question.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>For context, at present, my running is not about races, performance or competition, but more for fitness (both physical and mental).  I'm also very analytical and enjoy considering and observing the differences that variations in mechanics can provide.</p>
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<p>I am on the fence about trying out the Newtons, as I appreciate their mechanical potential, and have tried the pose method with ordinary shoes with no success (albeit likely with too little experimentation).  So here's my question:  Given the improved biomechanics that can achieved with the:</p>
<ul><li>reduced ankle roll motion potential of non-heal strike,</li>
<li>reduced compression of the quad on extension,</li>
<li>reduced arm swing (since the stride length is shortened)</li>
<li>and overall reduced heart rate resulting from all of the above,</li>
</ul><p>If one's objective is physical conditioning (vs competitive performance), would use of the Newtons reduce the ability to achieve the cardio and circulatory benefits sought (without having to double the time and distance of my running).</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Thanks in advance for your thoughts.</p>
 

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<p>While it can be fun to theorize, I would say:</p>
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<ul><li>a "biomechanical problem" is not a problem unless it causes you pain or injury, and therefore,</li>
<li>if it ain't broke, don't fix it.</li>
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<p>So "biomechanical improvements" by definition will allow you to train with fewer injuries, and thus train more consistently, leading to better fitness, not worse.</p>
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<p><img alt="" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif" title=""></p>
 
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