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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking at a Bianchi C2C 928, 2006 model with Veloce components. Any insights?
 

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Very nice bike, have you considered a compact front crank? I don't have a sense for your strength, but a lot of women really find the compact a nice solution rather than resorting to a triple.<br><br>
How's the price compare to the Dura Ace model? I don't know much about those wheels, they might not be great to train a lot on, but appear to be a high end wheelset that would be nice on race day. Campy makes nice wheels and hubs for sure.
 

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<a href="http://www.bicycling.com/article/1,6610,s1-1-2-15846-1,00.html" target="_blank">http://www.bicycling.com/article/1,6...5846-1,00.html</a>
 

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<a href="http://www.roadbikereview.com/cat/latest-bikes/road-bike/bianchi-usa-inc/PRD_366488_5668crx.aspx" target="_blank">http://www.roadbikereview.com/cat/la...8_5668crx.aspx</a>
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys. JR - the one I'm looking at has a double up front, not a triple. I guess the reason I'm leaning toward this bike is it's similar to my current bike (Bianchi reparto course, steel frame) but this is updated and upgraded version (that's my take on it at least). What may or may not be the downside is that they are both touring bikes, so comfortable, but maybe - less agressive (is that the right word?).<br><br>
Also, the tires (fulcrum racing 5) I've read are very sturdy, but maybe a little heavy. I'm okay with that - I like sturdy. I guess I just want reassurance that buying this bike for comfort, I won't give up anything I might need to race. Does that make sense?
 

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Who told you that's a "touring" bike? It has a pretty standard geometry, albeit with a fairly long top tube and a somewhat laid back seat post. I race a bike with similar geometry, it should be comfortable as any other race bike. It might not be so hot to bolt aero bars on if that is your goal, as you will need to get your hips forward and the seatpost angle (72 or so, a tri bike is maybe 7<img alt="cool.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/cool.gif"> will make it hard to get the position right.<br><br>
The cranks I was mentioning was a compact, not a triple. if you were happy with the gearing offered by your prior bike (e.g. 39 tooth small ring) then it should be fine, I'd check the rear gearing on your present bike and have them swap out if needed so it's the same.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I thought I read that. Maybe I made the assumption because my Bianchi is a touring bike, and I've read that the 928 is good for long rides like centuries. I may have swapped "comfort" for "touring." Thanks for the info - sounds like I can't lose with this bike, it's probably more bike than I'll ever need to race, and still comfortable like my current one.<br><br>
What's the difference between compact and double?<br><br>
Thanks again for all the knowledge and insights. When work ever slows down, I want to learn more - hopefully work on my own bike someday!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Okay, I'm reading about compact cranks - in between double and triple - losing a high gear, gaining a low gear and dropping some weight? Interesting.
 

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I switched to compacts (50-34). Best thing I ever did. Granted the stock gear on my bike was horribly tall (55-44) but hills are way easier for me now since I don't have as much pure strength. Went with JR's recomendation of a Shimano R700 and it was great.
 

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Cranks are either double or triple, i.e. two or three chainrings. You can buy a standard double with a 39 and 53 tooth chainrings, or a "compact" which makes the little ring a 34 or so and the large ring about a 50, which has the net effect of adding a couple teeth to your rear sprocket.<br><br>
What I like about the compact for many riders is you can have a low gear to climb hills, but still keep a fairly tight gearing, for example if your old bike had a standard double and a 12-25 cogset in the back (I'm guessing) then you could go with a compact and a tighter 11-23 in the back and still have exactly (more or less) the same hill climbing gear, while losing some of the two-tooth jumps (i.e. the 17 to 15 we all hate) on your old bike.<br><br>
I realize it sounds confusing, but having the "right" gear on your bike so you can turn the "right" rpms while keeping your heart beating at the "right" place is really a plus and the compact will help this.<br><br>
If it were me, I'd count the number of teeth on the largest cog of the rear of your present bike and look for the stamping on the small chainring to identify the number of teetch (39 usually) think if it worked out for you and speak with the shop about replicating this present gearing but with a compact and how that might impact the cost of the bike. Just a thought, I really do endorse compacts for most women of average fitness as a win-win solution.
 
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