Runners Forum - Kick Runners banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,689 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My son has outgrown his current bike. He grew 5inches in the past year. At 15yo, who knows how much he'll continue to grow. His current bike is a 49. The lbs said the 56 will fit right now, but suggested the 58.<br><br>
My options are an entry level Performance for $700 or something used. Advantages of new is it's ready to go, and lbs has great post sales service. Advantages of used is getting more bang for the buck. Disadvantages are unknown history/service the bike would need (ie additional costs).<br><br>
Thoughts? If we go used, suggestions?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,205 Posts
Any of the major brands will have a decent bike at that price point, they will save money on the crankset, brakes, seatpost, stuff like that and use a lower end Shimano drivetrain like that one below the 105. A wheel upgrade would be a good thing to consider on most bikes in that range. Most of those bikes will have triples, which he may not need or want, that can be swapped.<br><br>
You could get a decent used aluminium race bike in that price range with Ultegra 9 or 10 speed. If you are comfortable checking it out or know the history, that's not a bad way to go. The aluminum can get knocked out of alignment in a crash and a poorly maintained bike can run into a lot of expensive repairs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,689 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I really lucked out with the Trek. I talked to the guy at the bike shop back home, and he knew of a bike for us. I asked around the guys I used to ride with, what did they know about the bike/owner. Their reaction was "wow--he's getting rid of that bike? That's his baby!". So I knew it was well cared for, never wrecked, etc. Buying a bike unknown, I'm a bit worried about--esp Al or CF which in not nearly as forgiving as steel.<br><br>
So, would it be a bad idea to go ahead and buy entry level new, then upgrade as needed? I don't have a whole lot of $$$, but I want the kid to have a decent bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,205 Posts
An entry level bike is really quite nice, especially in the $700 range. The shop may need to swap out bars and stem for fit, but for the most part the components will be very nice, perhaps the brakes will have a more rubbery feel and the shifting will have a longer throw, but that's life. I'd get a new bike if it were me and be done with it.<br><br>
Mostly, on the entry level bikes the wheels are real abject garbage. I'd like to have something with 32 round spoke per wheel and a rim that doesn't require special tubes, plus cup and cone bearings in a hub that says "Shimano" rather than a Chinese hub with press fit cartridge bearings. Maybe they can work with you.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top