Runners Forum - Kick Runners banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
<p>As my first 50 miler (North Country Trail Run in Manistee, MI) is just over a week away, do any of you much more experienced runners have any last minute advice for a newbie?  I think I have my pacing, nutrition, and fluid plans set.  But, I'm not really sure what to do about a drop bag.  Normally, on my long runs, I carry everything I'm going to use in my camelbak.  I'm planning on using my camelbak and am not sure if I even need a drop bag.  But if I do, what are suggestions to put in it?</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Thanks all.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
<p>Consider putting extra socks in your drop bag in case something untoward starts happening to your feet.  Some people have a change of shoes.  Even if they are not blistering it can feel really good half way to change into a fresh pair of socks or shoes.  I even put in a small pack of "wet naps" so I can give my feet a little bath before the new socks go on.  I usually put in a foot first aid kit with things like tape, lube, band-aids or whatever you usually use to patch things up. </p>
<p> </p>
<p>Sunscreen, bug spray or extra salt tabs can come in handy, too.  I usually have some special food stuffs I like so I put that in, too. Currently this means Hostess fruit pies.  Yum.  I use the drop bag as much to drop off unwanted things as to pick up new stuff: drop off hat and get visor as the temps increase,  arm warmers off,  extra pies I thought would sound good but which I now can't imagine eating - it happens.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Have a great time.  A 50 miler was my first ultra too and it was a great learning experience.  Main lesson learned?  Don't stop eating - get in about 250-300 calories per hour.  It's so much more pleasant to run fueled than depleted.  Keeping the mental focus to do this can be a struggle the longer you're out there.  Good luck and be sure to let us know how it went.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Kate</p>
<p><a href="http://www.themadrunner.blogspot.com" target="_blank">www.themadrunner.blogspot.com</a></p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
380 Posts
<p>I am a mid to back of the packer, so if you are a speedster, this could be fairly irrelevant.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>About 18 months ago, I was lined up at the start line of my first 50 thinking to myself, "I have my pacing, nutrition and fluids set". Then while standing around and noticing all the t-shirts of races I could only dream of being worn by all these seasoned looking ultrarunners, I had my epiphanny, which has mainly held me in good stead since. "Do what they do". That's pretty much what I did - I kinda ended up following a few folks, walked when they walked, ran when they ran - and to be honest, at the outset, it seemed uncomfortably slow - but I am glad I did. I think I know enough now to believe I would never have finished that first one had I stuck with my original plan.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>So, my first advice - start out slowly, slower than you think you need to. Don't worry about time, you will PR regardless. You can always speed up later.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Eat often, drink often, take electolytes regularly (hopefully you know how much and when)</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I'm with Kate on the clean socks. May not need them, but if there are stream crossings, or it is humid, it feels good to change them. Also as Kate suggested, wet wipes are great too. If you are feeling tired and beat up, washing up your face and neck can really perk you up. Also, if you have had to make like a bear in the woods (whether you carry kleenex or not), some wet wiping action "down there", can drastically reduce the potential for some very uncomfortable chafing later. Desitin and spare lube is good to keep in the drop bag too for the same reason.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Finally, that 50 mile run changed my life - it was the stepping stone to my first couple of 100's, 24 hr runs and runs in different parts of the country in some of the most stunning scenery I have ever seen. I have made wonderful friends - from the front of the pack on back. So, my final tip is: embrace it, soak it all in, make friends and enjoy every second of it.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
<p>@Kate - Thanks for the advice. I had thought about socks & shoes earlier, but had since forgotten about it.  I will also definitely pack some handi-wipes.  It sounds like they could come in very handi (ha ha, pun intended).  There isn't really any special food that I thrive on other than PB&J, which they say will be at the aid stations, so hopefully, I will be ok there.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>@Mobius - Thanks</p>
<p> </p>
<p>@Jim - I know what you mean about the pace.  On most of my training runs, I ended up starting the run much faster than I would have liked, and paid for it later.  The only other ultra experience I have is a 50K as training a couple of weeks ago.  There, I made myself start in mid pack and shuffle along with the crowd for the first couple of miles.  This really helped set the tone for me later.  So far I have been really good about my walk breaks.  I made myself do them in my training runs as well to make sure that it worked for me.  I have no plans for a PR, (other than the one that comes automatically by running a distance never run before).  I have told everyone around me that this is all about overcoming the distance.</p>
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,290 Posts
<p>Definitely be mindful of your pace, especially in the early miles. Make sure you drink enough and are peeing :)</p>
<p> </p>
<p>As far as drop bags-- extra socks, a small foot care kit, gels/food/etc, lube. I always have a drop bag(s) and prefer to have it and not need it (rarely ever need it) than not have it.</p>
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top