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I suppose this question is for Toe Jam, Muzicgrl and any others who are very careful about what they eat and yet are very active.<br><br><span style="text-decoration:underline;">How do you deal with hunger? Are you constantly hungry? Do you just have to accept this if you want to stay lean? How do you maintain a balance of eating just enough but not too much?</span><br><br>
I try to eat bulky foods and I know I need to avoid junk food and too many snacks. I'm okay with my body but if I want to get faster and fitter, I know I could stand to have a little less body fat.<br><br>
So yeah, I've been wondering about this, and the kneecap breaking thing I posted about in random thoughts.
 

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For me (and I think it is highly individual), I find that if I keep my fat consumption a little higher---think mediterranean type diet--- but my calories lower, I feel more full. I also thin that hunger is highly mental. Boredom, stress, strong emotions etc. really give you a feeling of hunger when indeed you are not. If you can find another way to engage your mind or body, almost always the hunger was not true hunger, just boredom. I also drink a LOT of water.<br><br>
I also find that if I have a week of "I don't care" eating (like this week), that the next week is extremely difficult to eat the way I should. So, the first week or two for you of cleaner eating will be the most challenging and then it will get easier. With that said, I absolutely am not always a stickler for eating perfection. If I want something for more than like a day I just go for it, or if I have a day when no matter what I cannot get full, I just eat a lot. After weeks of really good eating and hard training, I need a major pigfest to stay sane, and in my opinion healthy. This week I ate macaroni and cheese for 4 meals so far <img alt="biggrin.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/biggrin.gif">
 

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I spread my food out over the course of the day into smaller meals. I eat lunch in two parts. I also try to have good snacks on hand like salad, carrots and hummus, an apple, etc.
 

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I'm a picky eater so I'm always having problems trying to find things to eat. And now that I'm on a very low wheat diet there are a ton of things that I used to eat that I can't now.<br><br>
So basically I'm stuck with apples, carrots, strawberries and steak. I just don't know what else to eat.<br><br>
Oh and baked fish on the fridays they have it here at work.
 

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For me this is exactly the case! Coupled with the fact that I really really love food and think about it pretty much every second of the day. To avoid the boredom and emotional eating pitfalls I keep myself surrounded with good food choices, eat low on the food chain and keep myself busy if I'm feeling like lying around on the couch may result in eating when I'm not hungry. Don't get me wrong, if I want a cupcake I'll eat a cupcake but like Becca said, it's all in moderation. I don't necessarily make any food "rules" but rather do what feels right and what will end up as good fuel for my mood and physical self.
 

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You need to break those habits of picky eating. I have learned to like a lot of things over the years, and more so in the past 4+ months of the macrobiotic diet. Can you eat soy? chicken? why are you only eating steak? No other frutis and vegetables you like?<br>
In the fall and early winter, i made it a goal to try at least one new thing every week, mostly from the extensive produce aisle at my local incredible market (Wegmans). I liked everything i tried except two things-- burdock root and umeboshi plums.
 

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See the problem with me trying these things is I can really only do it on Sundays and I'm only home 1 or 2 Sunday's a month. I get home from work late and even later on school nights so I tend to have a big breakfast a big lunch and a small dinner because I hate the way food sits around in my stomach at night. My goal is to try asparagas. I'm fairly certain I don't like it but maybe if I put some shredded cheese on it. I try to eat my veggies raw or par cooked, I have texture issues with food too.
 

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Oooh. asparagus is good! it is perfect season for it right now. You just need to keep eating things until you like them, seriously. I have grown very fond of many foods over the years. I spend my Sunday afternoons cooking for the week. What about beans? I eat a ton of beans, and they can be cooked in so many great ways! What about polenta? it is just corn meal. Polenta can be done in a lot of ways too. I eat a lot of whole grains-- brown rice, quinoa, millet, and a lot of the time i mix them-- 2/3 brown rice, 1/3 quinoa, yum!
 

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Hey Buxy!<br><br>
For me hunger is a pretty constant state. If I am eating properly I tend to get hungry often (not the case this week because I have been pigging). I try my very best to just deal with it by eating tons and tons of veggies with all my meals (probably 3-4 servings at lunch and dinner) and lots of high fiber foods. My job isnt good for eating often (because I have to leave the lab and specifically go in the kitchen to eat) so I generally only eat breakfast, lunch, small afternoon snack, and dinner. I gain weight super duper easily (I have been known to gain 5 pounds in one week without even eating crazy amounts of food) so I just deal with the hunger.
 

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This is pretty much me as well. And what Meri said...<br><br>
I really think the key is to accept you won't be 100% perfect. So many people fall off the wagon for a couple of days and say f&*k it, I'm quitting.<br><br>
I mostly do OK unless I'm awake after 10 or 11PM. That's normally 4 to 5 hours after my last meal and I get hungry. What I've found to be the best cure for this is to do a lot during the day and be asleep by then!
 

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For me, I don't eat a lot at one time, but I eat many times during the day.<br><br>
I eat about every 2 hours or so. I have a desk job and that makes it easy. For instance, I'll have a glass of juice and a kashi granola bar and then head to work. At about 9:30 I eat a bowl of oatmeal. Sometimes at about 11 I'll have a snack, like dried fruit (I love prunes). I usually have a lean cuisine at around 12 or so. At around 2, 3:30 and 5 or 5:30, its another snack, like almonds, yogurt, triscuits or fruit. Dinner is usually brown rice or whole wheat spaghetti and some variety of vegetable. Sometimes I'll have some chicken or fish, and sometimes some beans. Once I'm done with dinner, I don't usually eat anything else until the next morning and I don't eat anything after 7 p.m. as I'm in bed about 9.<br><br>
I lean towards being OCD so I track my food most of the time (Sparkpeople). Not only to make sure I don't eat too much, but also to make sure I stay in the range that I like, and get enough of everything.<br><br>
Long run days are a challenge as I don't seem to ever eat enough on those days.<br><br><br>
I think the hardest thing is figuring out what works for you.
 

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This is what I was trying to get at in my thread. I think mine should have had your title...yours is better <img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/smile.gif"><br><br>
Although, I eat even when I'm not hungry sometimes. However, I would also like the overall fat content to reduce. I think I have to add weight bearing exercise, too?
 

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TJ, I was asking in my <a href="http://www.kickrunners.com/forum/showthread.php?t=25104" target="_blank">badly titled thread</a> about if reducing overall fat intake would help or aid in reducing my lovely belly fat. Even if I'm at my goal weight, I have a gob o' fat on my belly.
 

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I just ran across this article about women runners not getting enough fat and thought you might want to read it:<br><br><a href="http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20080328.wlrunfat28/BNStory/specialComment/" target="_blank">http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servl...pecialComment/</a><br><br>
Women who run regularly should make sure they eat enough fat. A recent study has shown what Neety Panu found out the hard way: Female runners who eat too little fat in their daily diet are more susceptible to injuries.<br><br>
As a competitive marathon runner, Dr. Panu was trying to avoid fat altogether, anticipating that would improve her performance.<br><br>
"You think the lighter you are, the better you do. So the first thing that is out is fat," she said. "It will work for a while, but ultimately you pay a price."<br><br>
In 2000, Dr. Panu, who was still in her 20s, suffered a "debilitating" injury to her groin called an inferior pubic ramus stress fracture. She hadn't fallen down; the fracture was caused by running itself. It was an injury so severe she had trouble walking or even putting her clothes on.<br><br>
Scientific research published this January in an issue of the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition supports what Dr. Panu found out through personal experience: Your body is more likely to rebel if you skimp on fat. Researchers studied 86 women who ran a minimum of 32 kilometres a week. The women completed a food frequency questionnaire and reported any injuries they had over the one-year period of the study.<br><br>
More than half of the women in the study reported running-related injuries, most commonly to the ankle or foot. The study found that eating less than 30 per cent dietary fat left female runners 2½ times more likely to suffer from a related injury.<br><br>
"Sometimes female runners don't eat enough for their activity level," says Kristen Gerlach, lead author of the study and a physical therapist in Minneapolis, Minn.<br><br>
Though it is not known exactly why dietary restriction may lead to injuries, more and more research is finding a link between the two. Runners who restrict food intake have less fuel or energy available to help their bodies with normal functions such as menstruation, reproduction, tissue healing after tough workouts and bone growth, the authors reported.<br><br>
In addition, it is thought that insufficient intake of good fats, called polyunsaturated fatty acids, could result in a heightened inflammatory response and thereby increase injury severity.<br><br>
"Fat isn't an all-bad thing," Dr. Gerlach says. "It is okay in moderation and has some benefits. Perhaps protection against running injuries is one of them."<br><br>
Dr. Gerlach says her message pertains not only to elite runners, but also "people competing in local 10Ks." She suggests female runners add more healthy fats to their diet. Her tips include eating a handful of almonds as a snack, adding avocado to a sandwich at lunch time and eating omega-3 rich salmon for dinner.<br><br>
When Dr. Panu first felt pain in her groin, she was in her third year of medical school and preparing for the Toronto marathon. She tried to ignore the pain and keep running, but ultimately she couldn't even walk.<br><br>
"Once I knew I had a stress fracture, I thought 'Okay, this is a sign. But why?' " A sports medicine doctor helped her realize that she needed to increase her fat intake.<br><br>
As an endurance athlete, Dr. Panu had developed an aversion to fat. "There is a Type A personality among high-end athletes that is quite prevalent. There is a big taboo on fat."<br><br>
Dr. Panu took eights weeks off before she could gingerly start to run again on a treadmill. To add fat to her diet, she started eating a little butter, olive oil and almonds. Rather than eating just egg whites, she now eats the yolks as well. Instead of no-fat dairy products, she now chooses cottage cheese and yogurt with some fat in them.<br><br>
"Screw the fat-free yogurt," she says. "Go for the 1 per cent or 2 per cent. That's not going to throw you off. That's a healthy amount of fat."<br><br>
Dr. Panu, who is a radiologist in Thunder Bay, has recovered fully from her injury. She thinks nothing of going out for a five-hour run, cross-country ski or an all-day hike. She is passionate about fitness and determined not to get injured again.<br><br>
"I've come to the realization I don't want this ripped away from me. That's what makes me happy."<br><br>
With more good fats to fuel her way of life, she is in full gear. "I feel 110 per cent better and healthier."
 

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Same here. I really dont think we can do anything about where our bodies decide to store fat. I would have to get really, really lean (ie unhealthy) in order to not have a big ole jiggly belly.
 

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This is what I do as well. I eat every couple of hours pretty much, mostly grazing on raw fruit/veggies, partial energy bars, homemade muffins/breads etc. I'm hungry pretty much all the time. It's really annoying. <img alt="razz.gif" src="http://files.kickrunners.com/smilies/razz.gif">
 
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