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#1 of 10 Old 05-13-2011, 05:50 PM - Thead Starter
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Hi Folks!

 

I am using the 18-wk training program from trinewbies to prepare for my first HIM in September.  I have a few questions I am hoping you can help me with!

 

- How exact do I need to be in following this program?  For example, it calls for swimming on Mon, Tues and Thurs.  My Masters group meets on Mon, Wed and Sat.  Do I need to adjust my schedule to match their swim days?  Or is it okay as long as I have the same number of training days?

 

- The running durations seem short, i.e. 40 minutes, 50 minutes, etc.  I am used to training for marathons and ultras with distance in mind rather than time.  Is my thinking backwards on this? 

 

- I am not worried about running duration, but I am worried about speed.  The program doesn't call for speed work until the last few weeks.  If I already have the running base, can I work on speed sooner rather than later?  I have done mile repeats in the past to help with speed.  Can I add these in?

 

- Finally (I promise), I am assuming the bike miles are regardless of weather.  I am absolutely scared to death of riding in the rain.  How do I get over this? 

 

I know I have a ton of questions.  Any advice would be greatly, greatly appreciated!

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#2 of 10 Old 05-13-2011, 08:02 PM
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I've done 3 HIM's and haven't yet though I raced well.  So please take below comments with grain of salt.

 

- How exact do I need to be in following this program?  For example, it calls for swimming on Mon, Tues and Thurs.  My Masters group meets on Mon, Wed and Sat.  Do I need to adjust my schedule to match their swim days?  Or is it okay as long as I have the same number of training days?

-->  I am sure there are good reasons why each swim workout is placed where it is each week.  But I don't think it is a huge deal not to swim on the exact day suggested.

 

 

- The running durations seem short, i.e. 40 minutes, 50 minutes, etc.  I am used to training for marathons and ultras with distance in mind rather than time.  Is my thinking backwards on this? 

-->  I thought the same way (running being too short) about many of the HIM training plans.  I  think you can run more, as long as the intensity/duration on the bike is not compromised.  As far as distance vs. time, the discussion never dies... Run based on what you used to.   

 

- I am not worried about running duration, but I am worried about speed.  The program doesn't call for speed work until the last few weeks.  If I already have the running base, can I work on speed sooner rather than later?  I have done mile repeats in the past to help with speed.  Can I add these in?

-->  I think it is an individual thing.  I haven't been able to run at the speed I know I am capable (even without any speed work) after 56miles of biking yet.   So for me, there is no point of doing any speedwork.  If you are a strong cyclist and have no problem running strongly, sure speedwork would be necessary to keep you speed.  Not sure about effectiveness of mile repeats as a part of HIM training.  Maybe longer tempo run?

 

- Finally (I promise), I am assuming the bike miles are regardless of weather.  I am absolutely scared to death of riding in the rain.  How do I get over this? 

-->  I don't particularly enjoy riding in rain either.  But you have to get used to it - it may rain on race day.  I don't have any good advice other than... just ride slowly on a safe (i.e. bike path) place.  If the plan calls for certain intervals, I would do it on a trainer.

 

Good luck!    

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#3 of 10 Old 05-14-2011, 10:15 AM
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- Stick with masters and adjust your schedule.  Group swimming is the best roi

- People run WAY too much in training for triathlons.  I would NOT run more.  I run less every year and yet I run faster.  I would change the runs to focused runs and if you run more than 4 times a week you are running way way too much.  Bike miles should always be used to increase your base.  I ran ultras too, you'll get it over it.

- Then of the runs make them tempo, mile repeats are ok, but I think its silly to actually do them faster than 10K pace.  You don't need speed, you need strength in triathlon.  Do at least one tempo (or whatever speed run), 1 t-run, and 1 long run minimum, eliminate all junk runs

- Get a trainer.  I think riding in the rain is a hazard.  Cars can not see you.  My friend and I almost got hit several times in 1 ride in the rain.  Better to be alive and no broken bones.  However you can always try to manipulate your rides to a nicer day, don't be a slave to the schedule, allow yourself flexibility.

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#4 of 10 Old 05-15-2011, 08:29 AM - Thead Starter
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Thanks for the great advice!  A trainer is on my list!  In the meantime, when I can't ride outside I do back-to-back spin classes at the gym. 

 

yo sake - giving up the masters group was a big worry; I feel like I work harder and get more yards with my group!

 

niemsco - your suggestion on building my bike base makes total sense. I need to get on my bike every chance I get rather than run.

 

Thanks again! 

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#5 of 10 Old 05-15-2011, 10:01 AM
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Totally agree on the masters group.  I don't go to coached masters class but go to my tri club's group workouts.  Awesome way to get in 3500+yd while having fun and of course breakfast afterwards with the clubmates is the best part of getting up at 6am on Sat.

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#6 of 10 Old 05-16-2011, 05:16 AM
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*takingnotes*

 

I'm training for my first Oly, and I too have been worried about getting enough run miles in...even though I think I have a pretty good base after half mary training. 

 

I'm also terrified of riding in the rain...not because of rain, but because of cars not being able to see me!  Glad to hear I'm not just being a giant wuss.

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#7 of 10 Old 05-16-2011, 05:42 AM
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while I will agree that it's certainly safer to ride inside when it's raining, unless you are planning on DNS'ing your race if it rains on race day, get SOME experience riding outside in the rain.  choose your ride location carefully (bike path, perhaps), go easy, and watch out for painted lines and metal grates/storm drains.

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#8 of 10 Old 05-16-2011, 09:04 AM
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I agreed with Scott.

 

Triathlon is all about the bike, most especially for someone with a running background. The single most important thing to know is that the strong you are on the bike, the closer you will run to your ability. Meaning that you will never run in a triathlon (long course, anyway) what you can standalone. But the faster and stronger you are on the bike, the closer you will be able to run to what you are capable of.

 

For long course training (half Iron+) traditional speed work on the run will only make you tired. It is for the most part a waste. Instead stick with a few tempo runs and use one of your weekly brick runs to run short and hard. The biggest return on time invested (roi) is to spend time on the bike. Again, this is especially for you because of your background in running. You have all the tools on the run already. But not so the bike. Get strong on the bike, and then don't use it all. Not at first. Not until you start hammering your brick runs in training when coming off the bike in which you absolutely dropped the hammer. You'll know when that time is.

 

Biggest thing for you will be to "let go" of your running in order to get in the appropriate work on the bike. But the truth is, if you do the proper work on the bike, you will notice your run improve. But proper work on the bike is hard work. Very hard work. Bike transfers over to the run, but in your ability to do it off the bike AND in standalone.

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#9 of 10 Old 05-16-2011, 05:38 PM - Thead Starter
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Thanks again, everyone for the great feedback. 

 

em - I like pretty close to the Loveland bike trail.  It sounds like I may need to put my big girl pants on and get out there in the rain/drizzle.  We have plenty of it these days.

 

thor - it is hard for me to let go of the long runs. most of my friends are ultra runners and it kills me when they talk about their next 50K, ask me to join them for long runs, etc.  However, the importance of building a bike base is starting to sink in.  I started the year with a goal of completing my first HIM.  That means I need to be commited to the right kind of training.  Biking it is!

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#10 of 10 Old 05-17-2011, 06:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1Topodope View Post
thor - it is hard for me to let go of the long runs. most of my friends are ultra runners and it kills me when they talk about their next 50K, ask me to join them for long runs, etc.  However, the importance of building a bike base is starting to sink in.  I started the year with a goal of completing my first HIM.  That means I need to be commited to the right kind of training.  Biking it is!

 

I wound up doing something similar. My background and first love was running, and during my Ironman days I refused to give it up -- long runs with friends and that sort of thing. But what I did to fit all that in was to eliminate speed work AND to do my long runs as "filler", not first priority. That didn't mean skipping one or two here or there; instead it meant weekend focus of bike, so I'd ride the long bike ride on Saturday and then plod with friends on Sunday long, recover very well Monday, and launch back into the tough bike workouts on Tuesday. The week was all filler run miles except for brick runs, where I used those to get in speed and learn to run off the bike.

 

If you want to be fast, it is all about the bike... but we all have competing goals of also wanting more than just performance. But bike is where performance is at.
 

 

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